endocrine

adjective
en·​do·​crine | \ ˈen-də-krən How to pronounce endocrine (audio) , -ˌkrīn, -ˌkrēn \

Definition of endocrine

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : secreting internally specifically : producing secretions that are distributed in the body by way of the bloodstream hormones produced by the endocrine system
2 : of, relating to, affecting, or resembling an endocrine gland or secretion endocrine tumors

endocrine

noun

Definition of endocrine (Entry 2 of 2)

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Did You Know?

The body's glands remove specific substances from the blood and alter them for rerelease into the blood or removal. Glands such as those that produce saliva and sweat secrete their products through tiny ducts or tubes on or near the body's surface. The glands without ducts, called the endocrine glands, instead secrete their products into the bloodstream; the endo- root indicates that the secretions are internal rather than on the surface. The endocrine system includes such glands as the pituitary (which controls growth, regulates the other endocrines, and performs many other tasks), the thyroid (another growth gland that also influences metabolism), the adrenals (which secrete adrenaline and steroids), the hypothalamus (which influences sleep and weight regulation), and the ovaries (which produce eggs). Endocrine problems are treated by endocrinologists.

Examples of endocrine in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective All this exposure contributes to dysregulation in the astronaut’s immune and endocrine systems. USA Today, "On a planet where you cannot breathe, is living on Mars the best idea?," 30 Dec. 2020 There are two types of pancreatic cancer: exocrine tumors and endocrine tumors. Elizabeth Landau, CNN, "Why pancreatic cancer is so deadly," 8 Nov. 2020 The pancreas is an oblong organ that lies deep in the abdomen and is an integral part of both the digestive and endocrine system. Elizabeth Landau, CNN, "Why pancreatic cancer is so deadly," 8 Nov. 2020 Meanwhile, one in eight women in their lifetime will develop a thyroid disorder, which stems from a hormonal imbalance, which can be caused by endocrine disruptors. Alden Wicker, Harper's BAZAAR, "Just How Harmful are the Chemicals in Your Clothes?," 16 Oct. 2020 Dexamethasone is from a class known as corticosteroids, which are similar to a natural hormone produced in the adrenal glands, endocrine glands that sit atop the kidneys. Miriam Fauzia, USA TODAY, "Fact check: Alex Jones' claims about Trump's COVID-19 treatments, 'deep state' are false," 5 July 2012 Valenty’s chemistry background told her that nail polish ingredients contained endocrine disruptors and allergens. Georgann Yara, The Arizona Republic, "This Chandler company makes vegan nail polish that's a staple for high-end manicures," 24 Sep. 2020 All three of those chemicals are known endocrine disrupters. Sandee Lamotte, CNN, "FDA must do more to regulate thousands of chemicals added to your food, petitioners say," 23 Sep. 2020 Why endocrine disruptors are a problem Endocrine-disrupting compounds, or EDCs, are a broad group of chemicals that can interfere with natural hormones in people’s bodies in ways that harm human health. Kathryn Crawford, The Conversation, "How chemicals like PFAS can increase your risk of severe COVID-19," 31 Aug. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Because the endocrine system is similar across all mammals, studies like these have potential implications for humans too, says Jennifer Freeman, an environmental toxicologist at Purdue University who was not involved in the wallaby study. Corryn Wetzel, National Geographic, "Wallabies exposed to common weed killer have reproductive abnormalities," 9 Sep. 2020 All three groups of chemicals appear throughout our homes and can disrupt our hormone, or endocrine, systems. Erik Vance, New York Times, "The 3 Scariest Chemicals to Watch Out For in Your Home," 26 Aug. 2020 Intersex fish had begun showing up in the Potomac River, possibly linked to a class of runoff chemicals called endocrine disrupters. M. Boone Mattia, Washington Post, "A mother reflects on her long journey of reconsidering her child’s gender," 10 Sep. 2020 The book describes decades of scientific research showing how endocrine-disrupting chemicals, present in our daily lives and now found in nearly all people, interfere with natural hormones in our bodies. Kathryn Crawford, The Conversation, "How chemicals like PFAS can increase your risk of severe COVID-19," 31 Aug. 2020 However, a recent review found evidence has doubled in the last five years about the negative impact on our health of endocrine-disrupting chemicals in plastics, pesticides, flame retardants and other merchandise. Sandee Lamotte, CNN, "High BPA levels linked to 49% greater risk of death within 10 years, study says," 17 Aug. 2020 The waste incinerated by ATK produces perchlorates and PFAS, or polyfluoroalkyl substances, compounds that can harm the human endocrine system. Brian Maffly, The Salt Lake Tribune, "It’s time to stop burning volatile propellants at Salt Lake Valley rocket facility, groups say," 8 Aug. 2020 As a specialist, Dr. S was able to finely hone her expertise on just one system within the body: the endocrine system. Sarah Jacoby, SELF, "What It’s Like to Go From Treating Diabetes to Treating Coronavirus Patients," 16 Apr. 2020 Hormones, which may shape the baby’s brain and behavior, from her endocrine system. Sarah Zhang, The Atlantic, "A Bold and Controversial Idea for Making Breast Milk," 27 Feb. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'endocrine.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of endocrine

Adjective

1914, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Noun

1922, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for endocrine

Adjective

borrowed from French, from endo- endo- + -crine, as in olocrine, holocrine holocrine and mérocrine merocrine

Note: Word introduced by the French histologist Édouard Laguesse (1861-1927) in "Sur la formation des îlots de Langerhans dans le pancréas," Comptes rendus hebdomadaires des séances et mémoires de la Société de Biologie, 45. tome (1893), p. 820. The conclusions summarized in this report were treated in more detail in the author's "Recherches sur l'histogénie du pancréas chez le mouton," carried over two numbers of the Journal de l'anatomie et de la physiologie, vols. 31-32 (1895-96). In vol. 32, p. 245, Laguesse remarks on the word, now used in the collocation îlots endocrines, referring to the islets of Langerhans: "C'est en 1893 (29 juillet), dans une communication préliminaire faite à la Société de Biologie, que j'ais pour la première fois prononcé ce mot et émis cet hypothèse, mais avec une grande réserve…" ("It was in 1893 (July 29), in a preliminary communication made to the Société de Biologie, that I uttered this word and put forward this hypothesis for the first time, though with great reserve…"). In an undated manuscript note Laguesse commented on the introduction of the word: "Dès ma première communication sur les îlots pancréatiques en 1893, j'avais été gêné d'avoir toujours à répéter ce qualificatif 'à sécrétion interne' et j'étais frappé de la bonne allure et de la simplicité des termes holocrine et mérocrine créés par Ranvier. A son exemple je forgeai le vocable endocrine, de ενδον en dedans, κρινω je sépare, je sécrète. Il devait répondre à une véritable nécessité, si nous en jugeon[s] d'après son succès." ("From the time of my first communication on the pancreatic islets in 1893, I was bothered by the need to always repeat the qualification 'by internal secretion,' and I was struck by the attractiveness and simplicity of the terms holocrine and merocrine created by Ranvier. After his example I coined the word endocrine, de endon 'inside' and krinō 'I separate, I secrete.' It must have responded to a real need, to judge by its success.") (See reproduction of the note in Pierre Fossati, "Edouard Laguesse à Lille en 1893 crée le terme 'endocrine' et ouvre l'ère de l'endocrinologie," Histoire des sciences médicales, tome 38 [2004], pp. 433-40.)

Noun

derivative of endocrine entry 1

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Time Traveler for endocrine

Time Traveler

The first known use of endocrine was in 1914

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Last Updated

8 Jan 2021

Cite this Entry

“Endocrine.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/endocrine. Accessed 15 Jan. 2021.

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More Definitions for endocrine

endocrine

adjective
en·​do·​crine | \ ˈen-də-krən How to pronounce endocrine (audio) , -ˌkrīn How to pronounce endocrine (audio) , -ˌkrēn How to pronounce endocrine (audio) \

Medical Definition of endocrine

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : secreting internally specifically : producing secretions that are distributed in the body by way of the bloodstream an endocrine organ
2 : of, relating to, affecting, or resembling an endocrine gland or secretion endocrine tumors

endocrine

noun

Medical Definition of endocrine (Entry 2 of 2)

More from Merriam-Webster on endocrine

Nglish: Translation of endocrine for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of endocrine for Arabic Speakers

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