elect

adjective
\ i-ˈlekt How to pronounce elect (audio) \

Definition of elect

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1 : carefully selected : chosen
2 : chosen for salvation through divine mercy
3a : chosen for office or position but not yet installed the president-elect
b : chosen for marriage at some future time the bride-elect

elect

noun
plural elect

Definition of elect (Entry 2 of 3)

1 : one chosen or set apart (as by divine favor)
2 elects plural : a select or exclusive group of people

elect

verb
elected; electing; elects

Definition of elect (Entry 3 of 3)

transitive verb

1 : to select by vote for an office, position, or membership elected her class president
2 : to make a selection of will elect an academic program
3 : to choose (something, such as a course of action) especially by preference might elect to sell the business

intransitive verb

: to make a selection

Examples of elect in a Sentence

Adjective this elect body of students represents the best that the nation's high schools have to offer Noun the members of this all-American team are the elect of collegiate football Verb He hopes to be elected to the committee. I've elected to study French as my foreign language.
Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective The National Rifle Association’s board of directors voted Monday to re-elect longtime CEO Wayne LaPierre, signaling that the gun rights group isn’t changing direction despite a rise in mass shootings and its own internal turmoil. David Ingram, NBC News, 30 May 2022 The illusion of complete normality could prompt people to spend more and re-elect current politicians for office. Bruce Y. Lee, Forbes, 9 Apr. 2022 In some cases, those who are vaccinated but elect to not receive a booster would be subjected to game-day testing again starting Dec. 1, the NBA said. Tim Reynolds, chicagotribune.com, 7 Nov. 2021 In some cases, those who are vaccinated but elect to not receive a booster would be subjected to game-day testing again starting Dec. 1, the NBA said. Tim Reynolds, ajc, 7 Nov. 2021 Voters chose to re-elect incumbents Daniel Ursu and Juanita Lewis. cleveland, 4 Nov. 2021 And it’s one of those moments when any leader expecting to slide into re-elect mode as early as November of next year starts to get worried. Philip Elliott, Time, 26 Aug. 2021 The pension fund is also withholding its votes to re-elect members of the board’s audit and governance committees on grounds of failing to meet shareholder demands over climate-risk disclosures. Justin Baer, WSJ, 30 Apr. 2021 State residents voted to re-elect Republican Sen. Steve Daines despite a challenge from popular former Gov. Steve Bullock. Thomas Barrabi, Fox News, 17 Dec. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Georgia’s Marjorie Taylor Greene, then a congresswoman-elect, also attended. Jeff Barker, Baltimore Sun, 12 July 2022 Focussing on pre-Christian and early-Christian literature, Ehrman shows how Homer’s egalitarian afterlife, where all meet the same fate, gave way to Virgil’s version, where an elect few enjoy eternal rewards while the rest suffer torments. The New Yorker, 23 May 2022 The governor-elect in 2026 will have a short time to organize an administration and craft a state budget before taking office the first week in January. George Skelton, Los Angeles Times, 20 June 2022 In his first interview since being named CEO-elect of FedEx, Raj Subramaniam talks about preparing for a high-profile succession and setting a path for what’s next. Jena Mcgregor, Forbes, 2 May 2022 Hundreds attended the Rite of Priesthood Ordination, including the Archbishop Emeritus of Seattle, J. Peter Sartain; the Bishop of Shreveport, Francis I. Malone, and the Bishop-elect of Saint Augustine, Erik Pohlmeier. Frank E. Lockwood, Arkansas Online, 4 June 2022 On his first day as the presumptive Hamilton County prosecutor-elect, Greg Garrison didn’t exactly tell the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth. John Tuohy, The Indianapolis Star, 5 May 2022 Those in attendance virtually and in-person, according to committee testimony, were Hice, Biggs, Gosar, Reps. Perry, Gaetz, Jordan, Gohmert, Mo Brooks of Alabama, Debbie Lesko of Arizona, and Greene, then a congresswoman-elect. Farnoush Amiri, Chicago Tribune, 1 May 2022 Those in attendance virtually and in-person, according to committee testimony, were Hice, Biggs, Gosar, Reps. Perry, Gaetz, Jordan, Gohmert, Mo Brooks of Alabama, Debbie Lesko of Arizona, and Greene, then a congresswoman-elect. Farnoush Amiri, ajc, 1 May 2022 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Jones, then, was curious: After a tremendously disappointing 2021 season, why did Matthews elect to use his COVID season and opt for one more year in college? Zach Osterman, The Indianapolis Star, 8 Aug. 2022 The key is to avoid employers that offer products and services that cautious customers might elect to forgo or postpone. CNN, 29 July 2022 In November, Republicans are seeking to re-elect Gov. Kemp and Mr. Raffensperger, who both defeated pro-Trump primary challengers. Cameron Mcwhirter, WSJ, 28 July 2022 This fall is only the second time voters will elect a governor and lieutenant governor together. From Usa Today Network And Wire Reports, USA TODAY, 28 July 2022 Something that’s the culmination of years of hard work by progressive activists to elect people willing to reimagine — or abolish — problematic government systems, such as policing. Erika D. Smithcolumnist, Los Angeles Times, 20 June 2022 Mamdani, who serves on the Assembly’s energy committee, sees BPRA’s defeat this year as a mandate to elect more people with organizing backgrounds to serve in Albany. Kate Aronoff, The New Republic, 8 June 2022 Wisconsin's largest city, after all, tends to re-elect its mayors for long periods of time. Alison Dirr, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, 3 Mar. 2022 Voters decided not to re-elect Abbott this fall and Corrigan recently resigned. John Benson, cleveland, 3 Jan. 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'elect.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of elect

Adjective

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for elect

Adjective

Middle English, from Latin electus, past participle of eligere to select, from e- + legere to choose — more at legend

Verb

Middle English, from Latin electus

Learn More About elect

Time Traveler for elect

Time Traveler

The first known use of elect was in the 15th century

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Dictionary Entries Near elect

elecampane

elect

electable

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Cite this Entry

“Elect.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/elect. Accessed 15 Aug. 2022.

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More Definitions for elect

elect

verb
\ i-ˈlekt How to pronounce elect (audio) \
elected; electing

Kids Definition of elect

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to select by vote elect a senator
2 : to make a choice The team elected to kick off.

elect

adjective

Kids Definition of elect (Entry 2 of 2)

: chosen for office but not yet holding office the president-elect

elect

transitive verb

Legal Definition of elect

1 : to select by vote for an office, position, or membership
2 : to make a selection of elected her statutory share over the gift under the will

intransitive verb

: to choose an elective share the right of a spouse to elect against the will

More from Merriam-Webster on elect

Nglish: Translation of elect for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of elect for Arabic Speakers

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