ecstasy

noun
ec·​sta·​sy | \ ˈek-stə-sē How to pronounce ecstasy (audio) \
plural ecstasies

Definition of ecstasy

1a : a state of being beyond reason and self-control
b archaic : swoon
2 : a state of overwhelming emotion especially : rapturous delight
3 : trance especially : a mystic or prophetic trance
4 often capitalized : a synthetic amphetamine analog C11H15NO2 used illicitly for its mood-enhancing and hallucinogenic properties

called also MDMA

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Choose the Right Synonym for ecstasy

ecstasy, rapture, transport mean intense exaltation of mind and feelings. ecstasy and rapture both suggest a state of trance or near immobility produced by an overpowering emotion. ecstasy may apply to any strong emotion (such as joy, fear, rage, adoration). religious ecstasy rapture usually implies intense bliss or beatitude. in speechless rapture transport applies to any powerful emotion that lifts one out of oneself and usually provokes vehement expression or frenzied action. in a transport of rage

Examples of ecstasy in a Sentence

His performance sent the audience into ecstasies. actors are typically in ecstasy upon winning an Oscar
Recent Examples on the Web Every once in a while a character is seized by the sheer ecstasy of being. Edmund White, Harper's magazine, "Existential Noir," 6 Jan. 2020 Photo illustration by Margeaux Walter for The New York Times By the time the confetti cannons burst, the toddlers were shouting in ecstasy, their eyes fixed on the superstars onstage. Ben Sisario, New York Times, "‘Baby Shark’ Smells Money Onstage," 15 Nov. 2019 At night, from 2015 through April 2017, Macias directed the flow of $30 million worth of heroin, cocaine, ecstasy, crystal meth and fentanyl from Mexico to Kentucky's two largest cities: Lexington and Louisville. Beth Warren, courier-journal.com, "A ruthless Mexican drug lord’s empire is devastating families with its grip on small-town USA," 25 Nov. 2019 Everything, for Skeets, becomes an image; everyone, in Skeets’s work, seems to search for ecstasy, or escape, or oblivion, and every image can stand for any of those. Stephanie Burt, Harper's magazine, "Where We Live Now," 28 Oct. 2019 Prosecutors say the guards were sneaking an array of contraband into the prison — fentanyl, ecstasy, synthetic marijuana, prescription pills, alcohol and tobacco — by hiding drugs under their clothing and in their hair. Tim Prudente, baltimoresun.com, "Another corrections officer pleads guilty in Maryland prison smuggling ring," 11 Oct. 2019 About 508 additional grams of ecstasy was recovered, the press release states. Robyn Merrett, PEOPLE.com, "Former Shark Tank Contestant Arrested with $80,000 Worth of Drugs on Him, Police Claim," 25 Nov. 2019 The 27-year-old had about 110 pounds of ecstasy and about 2.5 pounds of methamphetamine in her possession when she was stopped at a routine border check in Germany in June. Ben Church, CNN, "Dutch Olympian jailed after 110 pounds of drugs found in car," 5 Nov. 2019 The officer found 229 grams of marijuana and 6.1 grams of ecstasy, according to the statement. Akira Kyles, baltimoresun.com/maryland/carroll, "Owings Mills man faces distribution charge after traffic stop in Westminster," 29 Oct. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'ecstasy.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of ecstasy

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for ecstasy

Middle English exstasie, extasy "elation," borrowed from Middle French extasie, "stupor, transported state," borrowed from Late Latin ecstasis, extasis "trance, swoon, profound sleep," borrowed from Greek ékstasis "displacement, mental distraction, astonishment, trance," from eksta-, stem of existánai "to displace, drive out of one's senses, confound," exístasthai "to be astonished, lose consciousness" (from ex- ex- entry 3 + histánai "to cause to stand, place," hístasthai "to be standing") + -sis -sis — more at stand entry 1

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Time Traveler for ecstasy

Time Traveler

The first known use of ecstasy was in the 14th century

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Statistics for ecstasy

Last Updated

18 Jan 2020

Cite this Entry

“Ecstasy.” The Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster Inc., https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/ecstasy. Accessed 26 January 2020.

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More Definitions for ecstasy

ecstasy

noun
How to pronounce ecstasy (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of ecstasy

: a state of very great happiness : extreme delight
: an illegal drug that is used to produce a feeling of excitement and pleasure

ecstasy

noun
ec·​sta·​sy | \ ˈek-stə-sē How to pronounce ecstasy (audio) \
plural ecstasies

Kids Definition of ecstasy

: very great happiness or delight

ecstasy

noun
ec·​sta·​sy | \ ˈek-stə-sē How to pronounce ecstasy (audio) \
plural ecstasies

Medical Definition of ecstasy

1 : a trance state in which intense absorption (as in religious ideation) is accompanied by loss of sense perception and voluntary control
2 often capitalized : a synthetic amphetamine analog C11H15NO2 used illicitly for its mood-enhancing and hallucinogenic properties

called also MDMA, methylenedioxymethamphetamine, XTC

Other Words from ecstasy

ecstatic \ ek-​ˈstat-​ik How to pronounce ecstatic (audio) \ adjective

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