eclipse

noun
\ i-ˈklips How to pronounce eclipse (audio) \

Definition of eclipse

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : the total or partial obscuring of one celestial body by another
b : the passing into the shadow of a celestial body — compare occultation, transit
2 : a falling into obscurity or decline also : the state of being eclipsed his reputation has fallen into eclipse
3 : the state of being in eclipse plumage

eclipse

verb
eclipsed; eclipsing

Definition of eclipse (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to cause an eclipse of: such as
b : to reduce in importance or repute
c : surpass her score eclipsed the old record

Illustration of eclipse

Illustration of eclipse

Noun

eclipse 1a: E earth, M moon in solar eclipse, P penumbra, S sun, U umbra

In the meaning defined above

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Examples of eclipse in a Sentence

Noun an eclipse of the sun The popularity of television led to the eclipse of the radio drama. an artist whose reputation has long been in eclipse Verb The sun was partially eclipsed by the moon. Train travel was eclipsed by the growth of commercial airlines.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The eclipse will start at 11:04 p.m. EDT (10:04 p.m. CDT) and end at 1:56 a.m. EDT (12:56 a.m. CDT). Leada Gore | Lgore@al.com, al, "Lunar eclipse of Buck Moon on July 4: What to know," 4 July 2020 During this other type of eclipse, the Earth blocks all direct sunlight from reaching the moon, and light refracted through the planet's atmosphere casts a bloody, reddish hue on its surface. Robert Hackett, Fortune, "How to watch the July 4 partial lunar eclipse," 4 July 2020 This eclipse will begin on July 4 at 11:07 p.m. EST. Elizabeth Gulino, refinery29.com, "July 4th’s Lunar Eclipse Will Bring Peak Drama," 3 July 2020 The eclipse never progresses to reach the dramatic minutes of totality. Sarah Brookbank, The Enquirer, "A lunar eclipse is happening this weekend. Will we see it in Greater Cincinnati?," 30 June 2020 The eclipse will be visible throughout most of North America and all of South America. Doyle Rice, USA TODAY, "A 'penumbral' lunar eclipse is coming this weekend. What does this mean?," 30 June 2020 Next comes the eclipse, which is a global event taking 2 hours and 45 minutes. Jamie Carter, Travel + Leisure, "How and When to See the ‘Thunder Moon Eclipse’ on July Fourth," 30 June 2020 The coast-to-coast eclipse on Aug. 21 of that year carved a 70-mile wide path of totality from the Pacific coast to the Atlantic, with hordes of people donning solar eclipse glasses to experience the unusual event. Fox News, "Stunning pictures show partial 'ring of fire' solar eclipse," 23 June 2020 The eclipse will be entirely visible in eastern Africa, the Middle East, southern Asia and Australia, according to Space.com. Caitlin O'kane, CBS News, "What to know about the Strawberry Moon lunar eclipse on Friday night," 5 June 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb And as intensity runs high during this season of protests, both Reese and Pettaway hope efforts to honor John Lewis will result in proper tributes to his legacy that won’t eclipse the work of his fellow civil rights heroes. Shauna Stuart | Sstuart@al.com, al, "Rename Edmund Pettus Bridge? Activists, politicians split: ‘It does not help history'," 24 June 2020 The growth of resale is coming at the expense of other retailers, particularly department stores, luxury stores, and clothing chains, and GlobalData expects secondhand apparel sales to eclipse fast-fashion’s by the end of the decade. Phil Wahba, Fortune, "The pandemic’s economic crunch is fueling the rise of the resale market," 23 June 2020 The theory then was that CSP would quickly eclipse solar photovoltaic panels that use silicon to turn light photons into electricity because CSP could make electricity more cheaply. John Fialka, Scientific American, "Futuristic Solar Plants Plagued by Glitches, Poor Training," 17 June 2020 But the word helped to eclipse the political dimension of what was going on, the socioeconomic disparities that preceded the upheaval. Katy Steinmetz, Time, "'A War of Words.' Why Describing the George Floyd Protests As 'Riots' Is So Loaded," 8 June 2020 Under Potter’s leadership, the federation grew to eclipse the Teachers Council and won consultation rights in the 1990s for teachers, paraprofessionals and support staff. Alia Malik, ExpressNews.com, "Shelley Potter steps down after 35 years running San Antonio ISD teachers union," 1 June 2020 This pandemic has eclipsed those figures in just one month. William M. Rodgers Iii, The Conversation, "Black Americans are bearing the brunt of coronavirus recession – this should come as no surprise," 6 May 2020 The coronavirus has eclipsed heart disease as the leading cause of death in Los Angeles County, California. David Hogberg, Washington Examiner, "Coronavirus becomes leading cause of death in Los Angeles County," 24 Apr. 2020 Why have New York cases so rapidly eclipsed California’s? Chronicle Staff, SFChronicle.com, "Coronavirus news from the Bay Area: March 24-25," 24 Apr. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'eclipse.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of eclipse

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for eclipse

Noun

borrowed from Middle English eclipse, clips, borrowed from Anglo-French eclyps, eclypse, borrowed from Latin eclīpsis, borrowed from Greek ékleipsis "abandonment, failure, cessation, obscuring of a celestial body by another," from ekleípein "to leave out, abandon, cease, die, be obscured (of a celestial body)" (from ek- ec- + leípein "to leave, quit, be missing") + -sis -sis — more at delinquent entry 2

Verb

Middle English eclypsen, clypsen, derivative of eclipse eclipse entry 1, probably after Medieval Latin eclīpsāre or Middle French esclipser

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Time Traveler for eclipse

Time Traveler

The first known use of eclipse was in the 13th century

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Statistics for eclipse

Last Updated

12 Jul 2020

Cite this Entry

“Eclipse.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/eclipse. Accessed 12 Jul. 2020.

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More Definitions for eclipse

eclipse

noun
How to pronounce eclipse (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of eclipse

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: an occasion when the sun looks like it is completely or partially covered with a dark circle because the moon is between the sun and the Earth
: an occasion when the moon looks like it is completely or partially covered with a dark circle because the Earth's shadow is on it
: a loss of power, success, popularity, etc.

eclipse

verb

English Language Learners Definition of eclipse (Entry 2 of 2)

: to cause an eclipse of (the sun or moon)
: to make (something) less important or popular
: to do or be much better than (someone or something)

eclipse

noun
\ i-ˈklips How to pronounce eclipse (audio) \

Kids Definition of eclipse

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a complete or partial hiding of the sun caused by the moon's passing between the sun and the earth
2 : a darkening of the moon caused by its entering the shadow of the earth
3 : the hiding of any heavenly body by another

eclipse

verb
eclipsed; eclipsing

Kids Definition of eclipse (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to cause an eclipse of The sun was eclipsed by the moon.
2 : to be or do much better than : outshine The racer's time eclipsed the old record.

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Comments on eclipse

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