eclipse

noun
\ i-ˈklips How to pronounce eclipse (audio) \

Definition of eclipse

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : the total or partial obscuring of one celestial body by another
b : the passing into the shadow of a celestial body — compare occultation, transit
2 : a falling into obscurity or decline also : the state of being eclipsed his reputation has fallen into eclipse
3 : the state of being in eclipse plumage

eclipse

verb
eclipsed; eclipsing

Definition of eclipse (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to cause an eclipse of: such as
b : to reduce in importance or repute
c : surpass her score eclipsed the old record

Illustration of eclipse

Illustration of eclipse

Noun

eclipse 1a: E earth, M moon in solar eclipse, P penumbra, S sun, U umbra

In the meaning defined above

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Examples of eclipse in a Sentence

Noun

an eclipse of the sun The popularity of television led to the eclipse of the radio drama. an artist whose reputation has long been in eclipse

Verb

The sun was partially eclipsed by the moon. Train travel was eclipsed by the growth of commercial airlines.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

The full eclipse will begin at 11:41 p.m. and last for just over an hour, until 12:43 a.m. This will be the best viewing time, when the moon is in the umbra, or the full shadow the Earth. Jill Kiedaisch, Popular Mechanics, "How a Total Lunar Eclipse Works," 18 Jan. 2019 In 1917, even as World War I was raging, Dyson persuaded the British government to budget £1,000 for a team of four astronomers led by Eddington to observe the coming eclipse. Andrew Robinson, WSJ, "The Experiment That Made Einstein Famous," 14 Feb. 2019 This supermoon partial eclipse will only be visible to those living in the southeastern coast of Australia, Tasmania, New Zealand’s Stewart Island, and the northern coast of Antarctica. Eileen Reslen, Popular Mechanics, "A Supermoon Partial Eclipse Is Happening Just in Time for Friday the 13th," 13 July 2018 This upcoming eclipse is lunar eclipse saros 124, which stretches from the years 1152 to 2450. Blaine Friedlander, Washington Post, "The super blue blood moon happens Wednesday. Here’s how to see it.," 29 Jan. 2018 During the 2017 solar eclipse, when solar-power generation was offline, Google encouraged Nest thermostat owners to opt into a program in which the devices cooled their homes before power supply fell due to the eclipse. Bradley Olson, WSJ, "Google, Amazon Seek Foothold in Electricity as Home Automation Grows," 27 Jan. 2019 Opportunities for writing and speaking will also shine brightly for you in 2019 with eclipses moving through the communications zone of your chart. Rebecca Gordon, Harper's BAZAAR, "Find Out What 2019 Has In Store For Your Zodiac Sign," 27 Dec. 2018 Each observatory lies within the path of the eclipse and is sure to be sharing images of the event. Eleanor Hildebrandt, Popular Mechanics, "It's Not Too Early to Start Thinking About the July 2019 Solar Eclipse," 7 Jan. 2019 There are only two eclipses left in the series: a solar eclipse will occur on Saturday, August 11, and a lunar eclipse will occur on January 19, 2019. Aliza Kelly Faragher, Allure, "What August's Aquarius Horoscope Means for You," 30 July 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

His love for Alabama football was only eclipsed by his love of the outdoors and his family. orlandosentinel.com, "Deaths in Central Florida: 6/6," 5 June 2019 But in the last few hundred meters, Japanese runner Yuki Kawauchi, the men’s first-place finisher, eclipsed her. Jenny Mccoy, SELF, "How Sarah Sellers Went From Surprise Podium Finisher at the Boston Marathon to Pro Athlete," 8 Apr. 2019 But this historical anomaly has seemingly eclipsed Earhart’s legacy as one of the most successful female aviators in history. Teen Vogue, "Pilot Amelia Earhart's Feminism Should Be Remembered in History," 24 May 2019 Adrián is one of three possible targets mentioned in the article - another one being Manchester City's Claudio Bravo, who has been eclipsed by Ederson at the Etihad. SI.com, "Spanish Report Claims Atlético Madrid Interested in Unsettled West Ham United Star," 28 May 2018 But his thought and image have been eclipsed over three decades of rapid industrialization and social change. Washington Post, "China’s Xi free trader to world, champion of Marx at home," 5 May 2018 DeRozan eclipsed the 1,000-point mark in a Spurs jersey in his 47th game. Pat Graham, The Seattle Times, "Nuggets brace for Popovich, Spurs in return to playoffs," 12 Apr. 2019 But this one looks to eclipse that paltry day in scale, if not in actual continuous content. Chaim Gartenberg, The Verge, "Twitch to stream almost every Pokémon movie and TV episode ever," 23 Aug. 2018 It will be eclipsed a year later by another entry in the giant telescope sweepstakes: the European Extremely Large Telescope, being built by the European Southern Observatory, also in Chile. Dennis Overbye, New York Times, "Extremely Large, Extremely Expensive: The Race for the Next Giant Telescopes," 11 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'eclipse.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of eclipse

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for eclipse

Noun

borrowed from Middle English eclipse, clips, borrowed from Anglo-French eclyps, eclypse, borrowed from Latin eclīpsis, borrowed from Greek ékleipsis "abandonment, failure, cessation, obscuring of a celestial body by another," from ekleípein "to leave out, abandon, cease, die, be obscured (of a celestial body)" (from ek- ec- + leípein "to leave, quit, be missing") + -sis -sis — more at delinquent entry 2

Verb

Middle English eclypsen, clypsen, derivative of eclipse eclipse entry 1, probably after Medieval Latin eclīpsāre or Middle French esclipser

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Statistics for eclipse

Last Updated

15 Jun 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for eclipse

The first known use of eclipse was in the 13th century

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More Definitions for eclipse

eclipse

noun

English Language Learners Definition of eclipse

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: an occasion when the sun looks like it is completely or partially covered with a dark circle because the moon is between the sun and the Earth
: an occasion when the moon looks like it is completely or partially covered with a dark circle because the Earth's shadow is on it
: a loss of power, success, popularity, etc.

eclipse

verb

English Language Learners Definition of eclipse (Entry 2 of 2)

: to cause an eclipse of (the sun or moon)
: to make (something) less important or popular
: to do or be much better than (someone or something)

eclipse

noun
\ i-ˈklips How to pronounce eclipse (audio) \

Kids Definition of eclipse

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a complete or partial hiding of the sun caused by the moon's passing between the sun and the earth
2 : a darkening of the moon caused by its entering the shadow of the earth
3 : the hiding of any heavenly body by another

eclipse

verb
eclipsed; eclipsing

Kids Definition of eclipse (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to cause an eclipse of The sun was eclipsed by the moon.
2 : to be or do much better than : outshine The racer's time eclipsed the old record.

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Comments on eclipse

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