eclipse

noun
\ i-ˈklips How to pronounce eclipse (audio) \

Definition of eclipse

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : the total or partial obscuring of one celestial body by another
b : the passing into the shadow of a celestial body — compare occultation, transit
2 : a falling into obscurity or decline also : the state of being eclipsed his reputation has fallen into eclipse
3 : the state of being in eclipse plumage

eclipse

verb
eclipsed; eclipsing

Definition of eclipse (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to cause an eclipse of: such as
b : to reduce in importance or repute
c : surpass her score eclipsed the old record

Illustration of eclipse

Illustration of eclipse

Noun

eclipse 1a: E earth, M moon in solar eclipse, P penumbra, S sun, U umbra

In the meaning defined above

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Examples of eclipse in a Sentence

Noun an eclipse of the sun The popularity of television led to the eclipse of the radio drama. an artist whose reputation has long been in eclipse Verb The sun was partially eclipsed by the moon. Train travel was eclipsed by the growth of commercial airlines.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The event will be visible for the entire U.S., reaching its maximum eclipse in the wee hours of the morning. oregonlive, "Stargazing calendar 2021: Eclipses, meteor showers and other astronomical events this year," 30 Dec. 2020 The full eclipse path starts at 9:49 UT over northern Canada and ends in Russia at 11:33 UT. Andrew Fazekas, Science, "10 spectacular stargazing events to watch in 2021," 29 Dec. 2020 Today's total #SolarEclipse was the only total solar #eclipse of the year. Jay R. Jordan, Chron, "Here's the stunning view of a total eclipse from space," 14 Dec. 2020 However, the shading is slight, so most people needed a telescope to truly see the penumbral eclipse, NASA said. Ryan Prior, CNN, "See the lunar eclipse during the full beaver moon," 1 Dec. 2020 In school, an eclipse is an excuse to go outside and wear funny glasses. Aliza Kelly Faragher, Allure, "Your Guide to Lunar & Solar Eclipses in 2021 and How They’ll Affect Your Life," 23 Dec. 2020 Around the time the eclipse image was taken, the comet was traveling at roughly 450,000 miles per hour, about 2.7 million miles from the sun's surface, NASA said. Katie Hunt, CNN, "Newly discovered comet photographed during solar eclipse," 21 Dec. 2020 Make arrangements to set goals and intentions, because this eclipse is also a New Moon that supports initiative and first steps. Tarot Astrologers, chicagotribune.com, "Daily horoscope for December 14, 2020," 14 Dec. 2020 The coast-to-coast eclipse on Aug. 21 of that year carved a 70-mile-wide path of totality from the Pacific coast to the Atlantic, with hordes of people donning solar eclipse glasses to experience the unusual event. James Rogers, Fox News, "Total solar eclipse set to cut a path across parts of South America," 14 Dec. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb December is on pace to eclipse May as the deadliest month of the pandemic. Dan Petrella, chicagotribune.com, "Illinois surpasses 15,000 coronavirus deaths, one week after eclipsing 14,000," 18 Dec. 2020 Running back Hayden Whites could eclipse 2,000 rushing yards in the postseason. Tess Demeyer, Dallas News, "2020 TAPPS football playoff preview: Dallas-area favorites, dark horses and players to watch in each division," 19 Nov. 2020 And at the rate set through six games, Trask would eclipse Burrow's mark of 60 passing touchdowns and throw for roughly the same amount of yardage (5,428 to Burrow's 5,671). Paul Myerberg, USA TODAY, "Ranking the best QBs in college football through Week 11 of the 2020 season: Kyle Trask's pace is record-setting," 18 Nov. 2020 With December’s 10-year average for traffic deaths running at 30, the final 2020 fatality total is on pace to top each of the previous four years but unlikely to eclipse the 411 deaths recorded on Minnesota roads in 2015. Paul Walsh, Star Tribune, "Minnesota's traffic fatality count so far in 2020 now equal to all of last year," 1 Dec. 2020 To become a bona fide threat in the West, the Warriors would probably need to eclipse that number. Connor Letourneau, SFChronicle.com, "5 pressing questions facing Warriors after a chaotic week of roster building," 26 Nov. 2020 The Bengals have six games remaining to try to eclipse their win total from last year and record a road victory for the first time since 2018. Tyler Dragon, The Enquirer, "'No one is going to feel bad for us': Burrow-less Bengals playing for pride," 25 Nov. 2020 The number of mail-in votes is certain to eclipse the 2.7 million cast in 2016, when Republicans returned 70,000 more than Democrats. John Haughey, Washington Examiner, "Officials predict 10M Floridians will cast ballots before Election Day," 20 Oct. 2020 Over the past four months, his campaign has raised over $1 billion, and that has enabled him to eclipse Trump's once-massive cash advantage. Arkansas Online, "Trump, Biden go on offense in states they're trying to flip," 18 Oct. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'eclipse.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of eclipse

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for eclipse

Noun

borrowed from Middle English eclipse, clips, borrowed from Anglo-French eclyps, eclypse, borrowed from Latin eclīpsis, borrowed from Greek ékleipsis "abandonment, failure, cessation, obscuring of a celestial body by another," from ekleípein "to leave out, abandon, cease, die, be obscured (of a celestial body)" (from ek- ec- + leípein "to leave, quit, be missing") + -sis -sis — more at delinquent entry 2

Verb

Middle English eclypsen, clypsen, derivative of eclipse eclipse entry 1, probably after Medieval Latin eclīpsāre or Middle French esclipser

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Time Traveler for eclipse

Time Traveler

The first known use of eclipse was in the 13th century

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Statistics for eclipse

Last Updated

14 Jan 2021

Cite this Entry

“Eclipse.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/eclipse. Accessed 17 Jan. 2021.

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More Definitions for eclipse

eclipse

noun
How to pronounce eclipse (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of eclipse

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: an occasion when the sun looks like it is completely or partially covered with a dark circle because the moon is between the sun and the Earth
: an occasion when the moon looks like it is completely or partially covered with a dark circle because the Earth's shadow is on it
: a loss of power, success, popularity, etc.

eclipse

verb

English Language Learners Definition of eclipse (Entry 2 of 2)

: to cause an eclipse of (the sun or moon)
: to make (something) less important or popular
: to do or be much better than (someone or something)

eclipse

noun
\ i-ˈklips How to pronounce eclipse (audio) \

Kids Definition of eclipse

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a complete or partial hiding of the sun caused by the moon's passing between the sun and the earth
2 : a darkening of the moon caused by its entering the shadow of the earth
3 : the hiding of any heavenly body by another

eclipse

verb
eclipsed; eclipsing

Kids Definition of eclipse (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to cause an eclipse of The sun was eclipsed by the moon.
2 : to be or do much better than : outshine The racer's time eclipsed the old record.

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Comments on eclipse

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