eclipse

noun
\ i-ˈklips \

Definition of eclipse

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : the total or partial obscuring of one celestial body by another
b : the passing into the shadow of a celestial body — compare occultation, transit
2 : a falling into obscurity or decline also : the state of being eclipsed his reputation has fallen into eclipse
3 : the state of being in eclipse plumage

eclipse

verb
eclipsed; eclipsing

Definition of eclipse (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to cause an eclipse of: such as
b : to reduce in importance or repute
c : surpass her score eclipsed the old record

Illustration of eclipse

Illustration of eclipse

Noun

eclipse 1a: E earth, M moon in solar eclipse, P penumbra, S sun, U umbra

In the meaning defined above

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Examples of eclipse in a Sentence

Noun

an eclipse of the sun The popularity of television led to the eclipse of the radio drama. an artist whose reputation has long been in eclipse

Verb

The sun was partially eclipsed by the moon. Train travel was eclipsed by the growth of commercial airlines.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Back during the total solar eclipse last August, Marie Claire reported that many women noticed their period cycles going haywire around the time of the eclipse. Katherine J. Igoe, Marie Claire, "What to Know About Your Period During the Super Wolf Blood Moon," 15 Jan. 2019 The July 27 eclipse will last for 1 hour and 43 minutes, according to NASA. James Rogers, Fox News, "Longest total lunar eclipse of the century: What you need to know," 27 July 2018 But the next total lunar eclipse that will be viewable from the U.S. is just seven months away, visible on January 20, 2019. Temi Adebowale, Popular Mechanics, "These Pictures of Venus and the Moon Together Are Stunning," 17 July 2018 Taurus Beginning in March – with a Pisces eclipse, you will be primed to meet an exciting new cast of characters. Rebecca Gordon, Harper's BAZAAR, "Your Horoscope For the Year Ahead," 29 Dec. 2016 That’s when the partial phase of the eclipse starts. Brian Resnick, Vox, "The longest lunar eclipse of the century will be on July 27," 24 July 2018 The period of totality during this eclipse will last for 1 hour and 2 minutes. Denise Chow /, NBC News, "Total lunar eclipse will turn the moon blood red later this month," 13 July 2018 Between eclipses, retrogrades, and the sun moving across your intimacy zone, the past few weeks were pretty brutal. Aliza Kelly Faragher, Allure, "What September's Capricorn Horoscope Means for You," 30 Aug. 2018 The eclipse, which will last 1 hour and 43 minutes, won’t be visible in North America, according to EarthSky.org. Sarah Wu, The Seattle Times, "Look for bright view of Mars tonight as it moves closest to Earth in 15 years," 27 July 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

The heavier, less powerful, less grippy electric cars were in no danger of eclipsing the lap times of their vastly more expensive hybrid cousins, and no one makes the classic cars use a shorter layout for that event. Jonathan M. Gitlin, Ars Technica, "Formula E starts season 5 in Saudi Arabia with a faster electric race car," 14 Dec. 2018 But if Gravesend Inn is any indication, traditional haunted houses aren’t in danger of being eclipsed by Instagram pop-ups, at least not yet. Rebecca Jennings, Vox, "The Halloween experience in 2018 is less spooky and more selfies.," 22 Oct. 2018 The most recent boom came in the 1990s, but since then, the region's been eclipsed by more profitable shale plays. Alex Nussbaum, Houston Chronicle, "Aging oil play getting new life," 15 June 2018 The conversion of Tribune Tower is expected to cost more than $500 million, with the development of the new tower easily eclipsing that figure. Blair Kamin And Ryan Ori, chicagotribune.com, "Developers plan city's second-tallest skyscraper next to new Tribune Tower condos," 16 Apr. 2018 To put these numbers in perspective, nuclear power currently generates 20 percent of all U.S. energy, which means renewable sources, when taken all together, are on the verge of eclipsing nuclear. Avery Thompson, Popular Mechanics, "Renewables Are Supplying a Record Amount of America's Energy," 20 Feb. 2018 Diaz is currently on pace for 63 saves in a season, which would eclipse the record of 62 set by Francisco Rodriguez in 2008 with the Angels. Ryan Divish, The Seattle Times, "No pitching or late-inning phone calls for Mariners’ closer Edwin Diaz on Monday in Oakland," 13 Aug. 2018 His 169 strikeouts prior to the All-Star break eclipsed Mike Scott's 32-year-old franchise record. Chandler Rome, Houston Chronicle, "Astros held scoreless in loss to A's," 10 July 2018 Norris and King both eclipsed Eric Strabel's 2013 record of 42:55, which at the time took down Bill Spencer's iconic mark of 43:21 from 1981. Beth Bragg, Anchorage Daily News, "With an elite competitor hot on his heels, Anchorage’s David Norris takes back men’s Mount Marathon title," 5 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'eclipse.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of eclipse

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for eclipse

Noun

borrowed from Middle English eclipse, clips, borrowed from Anglo-French eclyps, eclypse, borrowed from Latin eclīpsis, borrowed from Greek ékleipsis "abandonment, failure, cessation, obscuring of a celestial body by another," from ekleípein "to leave out, abandon, cease, die, be obscured (of a celestial body)" (from ek- ec- + leípein "to leave, quit, be missing") + -sis -sis — more at delinquent entry 2

Verb

Middle English eclypsen, clypsen, derivative of eclipse eclipse entry 1, probably after Medieval Latin eclīpsāre or Middle French esclipser

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Statistics for eclipse

Last Updated

9 Feb 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for eclipse

The first known use of eclipse was in the 13th century

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More Definitions for eclipse

eclipse

noun

English Language Learners Definition of eclipse

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: an occasion when the sun looks like it is completely or partially covered with a dark circle because the moon is between the sun and the Earth
: an occasion when the moon looks like it is completely or partially covered with a dark circle because the Earth's shadow is on it
: a loss of power, success, popularity, etc.

eclipse

verb

English Language Learners Definition of eclipse (Entry 2 of 2)

: to cause an eclipse of (the sun or moon)
: to make (something) less important or popular
: to do or be much better than (someone or something)

eclipse

noun
\ i-ˈklips \

Kids Definition of eclipse

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a complete or partial hiding of the sun caused by the moon's passing between the sun and the earth
2 : a darkening of the moon caused by its entering the shadow of the earth
3 : the hiding of any heavenly body by another

eclipse

verb
eclipsed; eclipsing

Kids Definition of eclipse (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to cause an eclipse of The sun was eclipsed by the moon.
2 : to be or do much better than : outshine The racer's time eclipsed the old record.

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Comments on eclipse

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