eclipse

1 of 2

noun

1
a
: the total or partial obscuring of one celestial body by another
b
: the passing into the shadow of a celestial body compare occultation, transit
2
: a falling into obscurity or decline
also : the state of being eclipsed
his reputation has fallen into eclipse
3
: the state of being in eclipse plumage

Illustration of eclipse

Illustration of eclipse
  • E earth
  • M moon in solar eclipse
  • P penumbra
  • S sun
  • U umbra

eclipse

2 of 2

verb

eclipsed; eclipsing

transitive verb

: to cause an eclipse of: such as
b
: to reduce in importance or repute
c
: surpass
her score eclipsed the old record

Example Sentences

Noun an eclipse of the sun The popularity of television led to the eclipse of the radio drama. an artist whose reputation has long been in eclipse Verb The sun was partially eclipsed by the moon. Train travel was eclipsed by the growth of commercial airlines.
Recent Examples on the Web
Noun
When this occurs, Earth casts two shadows on the moon during the eclipse. Ashley Strickland, CNN, 6 Jan. 2023 Because from that location during the eclipse the International Space Station also transited the Sun! Discover Magazine, 16 Oct. 2022 The moon during an eclipse above the Salgo Castle in Salgotarjan, Hungary. Globe Staff, BostonGlobe.com, 16 May 2022 Those in Hawaii will be able to see every stage of the eclipse, NASA said. Li Cohen, CBS News, 7 Nov. 2022 And lucky people in Alaska and Hawaii will be able to see every stage of the eclipse. Sarah Yang, Sunset Magazine, 7 Nov. 2022 At the peak of the eclipse, the moon will be 242,740 miles away, according to NASA scientists. Marcia Dunn, Anchorage Daily News, 7 Nov. 2022 At the peak of the eclipse, the moon will be 242740 miles (390,653 kilometers) away, according to NASA scientists. Time, 6 Nov. 2022 The eclipse will begin in the early hours of Friday morning, at about 1 a.m. EST (10 p.m. PST). Monica Cull, Discover Magazine, 17 Nov. 2021
Verb
The Trojans did not eclipse 100 yards of total offense until late in the third quarter. Creg Stephenson | Cstephenson@al.com, al, 16 Dec. 2022 One of the goals of the new joint venture is to more equitably share profits with filmmakers, including creators and crew members, as video streaming begins to eclipse traditional theatrical release formats. Megan Cerullo, CBS News, 21 Nov. 2022 However, Tatis, Jr. will not eclipse $30 million in annual salary until 2029 during his age 30 season according to Cot’s Baseball Contracts. Forbes, 13 Nov. 2021 From afar, the four-day trade show looks like a Super Bowl for dapper dandies worldwide except the action takes place on the streets of Florence and the pomp and circumstance certainly eclipse the American tradition. Isiah Magsino, Town & Country, 12 Jan. 2023 And that is where Baja Sub really shines — the vegetable side dishes that not only hold their own but often eclipse the main courses. Los Angeles Times, 15 Dec. 2022 In a recent research note, Mr. Scholes predicted that the fourth quarter of 2022 would be the first where pricing would eclipse 2019 levels since the pandemic began. Jacob Passy, WSJ, 29 Nov. 2022 That would be the longest since World War II and eclipse the downturn that followed the 2008 global financial crisis, though the central bank said that any declines in GDP heading into 2024 would likely be relatively small. Hanna Ziady, CNN, 11 Nov. 2022 But if Mack can stay fit, his teaming with Joey Bosa, another Pro Bowler, gives the Chargers a 1-2, pass-rushing punch that few teams can eclipse. Jay Paris, Forbes, 31 July 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'eclipse.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

Word History

Etymology

Noun

borrowed from Middle English eclipse, clips, borrowed from Anglo-French eclyps, eclypse, borrowed from Latin eclīpsis, borrowed from Greek ékleipsis "abandonment, failure, cessation, obscuring of a celestial body by another," from ekleípein "to leave out, abandon, cease, die, be obscured (of a celestial body)" (from ek- ec- + leípein "to leave, quit, be missing") + -sis -sis — more at delinquent entry 2

Verb

Middle English eclypsen, clypsen, derivative of eclipse eclipse entry 1, probably after Medieval Latin eclīpsāre or Middle French esclipser

First Known Use

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of eclipse was in the 13th century

Dictionary Entries Near eclipse

Cite this Entry

“Eclipse.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/eclipse. Accessed 29 Jan. 2023.

Kids Definition

eclipse

1 of 2 noun
1
a
: the total or partial hiding of a planet, star, or moon by another
b
: the passing into the shadow of a planet, star, or moon
2
: a falling into disgrace or out of use or public favor

eclipse

2 of 2 verb
eclipsed; eclipsing
1
: to cause an eclipse of
2
a
: to reduce in importance
b
: to do or be much better than : outshine

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