downsize

verb
down·​size | \ ˈdau̇n-ˌsīz How to pronounce downsize (audio) \
downsized; downsizing; downsizes

Definition of downsize

transitive verb

1 : to reduce in size especially : to design or produce in smaller size
2 : to fire (employees) for the purpose of downsizing a business

intransitive verb

: to undergo a reduction in size

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Examples of downsize in a Sentence

They have downsized the car's engine in the new model. The company is planning to downsize next year. The company will be downsized next year.
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Recent Examples on the Web

States, cities and counties should also consider closing or at least downsizing jails. Keith Humphreys, Washington Post, "How jails stay full even as crime falls," 6 June 2019 People would have said five years ago that Ford—or nobody—would go clean-sheet on a new large-displacement gas V8 when the market is downsizing engines everywhere. Matthew Jancer, Popular Mechanics, "Ford Keeps It Old-School With the New 7.3-Liter Gas V8," 1 May 2019 Mike Manley, who took over for the late Sergio Marchionne last year, said the company downsized its workforce significantly during the global financial crisis a decade ago, and smaller cuts have been made since. Tom Krisher, The Seattle Times, "Fiat Chrysler CEO says company strong enough to stand alone," 14 Jan. 2019 The return to the river is fueled by two generations with spending power: downsizing baby boomers like the Rosses, whose two daughters are at East Coast colleges, and young professionals who crave community, walkability and a touch of nature. Cecilie Rohwedder, WSJ, "The Latest Housing Hotspot: Downtown and by the River," 6 Dec. 2018 My pal Cathy Barrow and her husband, Dennis, were living the downsizing dream. Bonnie S. Benwick, The Seattle Times, "Kitchen confidential: How I downsized the most important room in the house," 24 Sep. 2018 In episode three, Kondo visits the Mersier family, who moved from a large house in Michigan to a smaller apartment in Los Angeles but never downsized their things in the process. Lonnie Firestone, Glamour, "It Took a Fire in My Building to Understand Marie Kondo's Method," 15 Jan. 2019 The push to change seismic survey rules has not attracted the same public attention as the Trump administration's interest in opening coastal waters to dozens of new drilling leases or downsizing protected marine areas. Author: Rosanna Xia, Anchorage Daily News, "New rules would make it easier to find offshore oil – and noisier for whales," 12 Apr. 2018 Not long after the downsizing proposal emerged, MWD started talking about picking up agriculture's unfunded portion, with the assumption that the agency could recoup the extra cost by selling tunnel capacity to growers after the project is built. Bettina Boxall, latimes.com, "Southern California plans to spend $11 billion on the delta tunnels. Who will end up paying?," 16 Apr. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'downsize.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of downsize

1975, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

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Statistics for downsize

Last Updated

13 Jun 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for downsize

The first known use of downsize was in 1975

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More Definitions for downsize

downsize

verb

Financial Definition of downsize

What It Is

Downsizing is a strategy used to reduce the size and scope of a business in order to improve its financial performance, usually by laying off employees or closing less-profitable divisions.

How It Works

Downsizing often takes place as part of a larger restructuring program at a company. Although it's usually thought of as a strategy companies use to become smaller, downsizing can also be the result of company mergers, acquisitions, and takeovers.

Its most common form comes in employee layoffs, which reduce payroll costs for the company. Downsizing may also involve shuttering some operations or offering certain employees early retirement.

Why It Matters

Downsizing is typically seen during economic downturns in order to improve efficiency and maintain profitability. However, if too many companies cut payrolls, it can further the downturn due to higher unemployment.

As well, companies may downsize in order to improve their attractiveness to potential acquirers and their cost-cutting moves could result in a buyout offer.

Source: Investing Answers

downsize

verb

English Language Learners Definition of downsize

: to make (something) smaller
: to make a company smaller and more efficient by reducing the number of workers

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More from Merriam-Webster on downsize

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with downsize

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for downsize

Spanish Central: Translation of downsize

Nglish: Translation of downsize for Spanish Speakers

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