domicile

noun
do·​mi·​cile | \ ˈdä-mə-ˌsī(-ə)l How to pronounce domicile (audio) , ˈdō- How to pronounce domicile (audio) ; ˈdä-mə-sil \
variants: or less commonly domicil \ ˈdä-​mə-​səl How to pronounce domicile (audio) \

Definition of domicile

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a dwelling place : place of residence : home
2 law
a : a person's fixed, permanent, and principal home for legal purposes Report your change of domicile.
b business : residence sense 2b

domicile

verb
domiciled; domiciling

Definition of domicile (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

law
: to establish in or provide with a domicile the state where the decedent was domiciled

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Domicile Has Latin Roots

Noun

Domicile traces to Latin domus, meaning "home," and English speakers have been using it as a word for "home" since at least the 15th century. In the eyes of the law, a domicile can also be a legal residence, the address from which one registers to vote, licenses a car, and pays income tax. Wealthy people may have several homes in which they live at different times of the year, but only one of their homes can be their official domicile for all legal purposes.

Examples of domicile in a Sentence

Noun You will need to report your change of domicile to your insurance company. Students must establish a domicile in the state to be eligible for reduced tuition. Verb the university domiciles students in a variety of buildings in and around its urban campus
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Its name doesn't appear on the directory of its Plantation, Florida, domicile, and a receptionist drew a blank when an AP reporter asked for a company representative at the office earlier this month. Frank Bajak, Star Tribune, "The big Pentagon internet mystery now partially solved," 24 Apr. 2021 Despite its Australian domicile and management, the major shareholder, with a 9.4% stake in Greenland Minerals, is the Chinese company, Shenghe Resources. Tim Treadgold, Forbes, "Greenland Said No To Trump And Now Says No To Australia And China," 9 Apr. 2021 Clever ploys such as domicile shifting and inversions will be relegated to the scrapheap of corporate history. WSJ, "A Global Minimum Corporate Tax Is a Loser," 11 Apr. 2021 The domicile review starts with the 183-day rule, but that’s only the beginning. Bob Carlson, Forbes, "You’ve Moved. Be Sure You Can Prove It To The Tax Authorities," 21 Mar. 2021 The three-acre estate houses a five-bedroom domicile with vaulted ceilings and floor-to-ceiling windows. Chris Morris, Fortune, "WhatsApp cofounder spent more than $300 million on L.A. mansions," 18 Feb. 2021 My solution while Melvin was constantly traveling was to read and keep our domicile, all the while missing the news business. Rex Nelson, Arkansas Online, "Salty old editor," 13 Feb. 2021 Trump and the first lady changed their domicile from New York City to Palm Beach in 2018, using Mar-a-Lago as their official address. Washington Post, "Mar-a-Lago should be shut down after New Year’s Eve party violated covid rules, state lawmaker says," 5 Jan. 2021 Whereas his daughter’s domicile, shared with her husband, played by Hugh Grant, and their son, has a style that’s still monied but much more relaxed—or as relaxed as can be with Gerhardt Richter paintings on the wall. Adam Rathe, Town & Country, "How to Be Rich on TV: The Undoing and What Money Looks Like on Screen," 2 Nov. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb By having more funds domiciled in Singapore, the government hopes to not only attract more cash, but also jobs in the legal and accounting sectors. Bloomberg.com, "Singapore Woos World’s Biggest Money Managers With New Law," 8 May 2020 The current crisis might instead prompt us to ask whether companies domiciled in tax havens have any right to come crying to governments for a handout. Helen Lewis, The Atlantic, "You Should Politicize the Coronavirus," 1 May 2020 That wasn’t the case five years ago when AbbVie sought to reduce its tax bill by merging with Shire, which was domiciled in Ireland where the corporate rate is 12.5% and intellectual property is taxed at 6.25%. The Editorial Board, WSJ, "Tax Reform’s Remedy for Outsourcing," 25 June 2019 That levy, collected at the end of December, falls heavily on American giants Google, Apple, Facebook and Amazon, which have frequently been criticized for sidestepping local taxes by domiciling core operations in lower-tax nations. Vivienne Walt, Fortune, "French Winemakers Are Angry About Trump’s Tariffs. American Importers Are Even Angrier," 10 Jan. 2020 For centuries, a vast range of African art has been domiciled outside the continent. Oluwatosin Adeshokan, Quartz Africa, "How a new museum in Lagos with art fit for a prince hopes to inspire and educate," 7 Mar. 2020 Li, worth some $30 billion as of June, started to reduce his risk in Hong Kong over 30 years ago by re-domiciling his principal holding company in Bermuda well before the U.K. handed its colony back to China in 1999. Geoffrey Smith, Fortune, "Why One of Asia’s Richest Men Is Buying a British Pub Business Right Before Brexit," 24 Aug. 2019 This again indicates that Ford travelled to North Carolina because Williamson was—his attorneys will contend—domiciled there. Michael Mccann, SI.com, "The Technicality That Could Derail Zion Williamson's Lawsuit," 27 Sep. 2019 There is no dispute that Ford is a citizen of Florida and is domiciled there. Michael Mccann, SI.com, "The Technicality That Could Derail Zion Williamson's Lawsuit," 27 Sep. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'domicile.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of domicile

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1809, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for domicile

Noun and Verb

Middle English, from Middle French, from Latin domicilium, from domus — see dome entry 1

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Time Traveler for domicile

Time Traveler

The first known use of domicile was in the 15th century

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Statistics for domicile

Last Updated

5 May 2021

Cite this Entry

“Domicile.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/domicile. Accessed 10 May. 2021.

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More Definitions for domicile

domicile

noun

English Language Learners Definition of domicile

law : the place where you live : your home

domicile

noun
do·​mi·​cile | \ ˈdä-mə-ˌsīl How to pronounce domicile (audio) \

Kids Definition of domicile

: a place where someone lives

domicile

noun
do·​mi·​cile | \ ˈdä-mə-ˌsīl, ˈdō- How to pronounce domicile (audio) \

Legal Definition of domicile

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : the place where an individual has a fixed and permanent home for legal purposes

called also legal residence

2 : the place where an organization (as a corporation) is chartered or that is the organization's principal place of business — compare citizenship, residence

Note: The domicile of an individual or organization determines the proper jurisdiction and venue for legal process. The courts of a person's domicile have personal jurisdiction. For persons lacking capacity (as minors), domicile is often statutorily determined as the domicile of the guardian.

domicile

transitive verb
domiciled; domiciling

Legal Definition of domicile (Entry 2 of 2)

: to establish in or provide with a domicile an alien admitted to the United States for permanent residence shall be deemed a citizen of the State in which such alien is domiciledU.S. Code any state in which a corporation is domiciled— L. H. Tribe

History and Etymology for domicile

Noun

Latin domicilium dwelling place, home

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