divert

verb
di·​vert | \ də-ˈvərt How to pronounce divert (audio) , dī-\
diverted; diverting; diverts

Definition of divert

intransitive verb

: to turn aside : deviate studied law but diverted to diplomacy

transitive verb

1a : to turn from one course or use to another : deflect divert traffic to a side street diverting funds to other projects
b : distract trying to divert her attention
2 : to give pleasure to especially by distracting the attention from what burdens or distresses children diverting themselves with their toys

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Choose the Right Synonym for divert

amuse, divert, entertain mean to pass or cause to pass the time pleasantly. amuse suggests that one's attention is engaged lightly. amuse yourselves while I make dinner divert implies distracting attention from worry or routine occupation especially by something funny. a light comedy to divert the tired businessman entertain suggests supplying amusement by specially contrived methods. a magician entertaining children at a party

Examples of divert in a Sentence

Police diverted traffic to a side street. The stream was diverted toward the farmland. They were charged with illegally diverting public funds for private use. He lied to divert attention from the real situation. They're only proposing the law to divert attention from important issues.
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Recent Examples on the Web

The movies that sure seem like they should be considered romantic comedies, but that divert in some critical ways. Cady Drell, Marie Claire, "Quiz: Are These Popular Movies Technically Romantic Comedies?," 11 Feb. 2019 Most commonly, the Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) is abused to divert gigabytes, or possibly even petabytes, of high-value traffic to ISPs inside Russia or China, sometimes for years at a time, so that the data can be analyzed or manipulated. Dan Goodin, Ars Technica, "How 3ve’s BGP hijackers eluded the Internet—and made $29M," 21 Dec. 2018 But many say this headline-grabbing, top-down strategy has worsened every aspect of the security problem, diverting resources from local police, fragmenting gangs and making local governments less accountable. Ciara Nugent, Time, "Mexico Is Suffering Its Bloodiest Year in Modern History. Here's Why," 28 June 2018 However, Zubrin and other critics view the Gateway as a cul-de-sac that would divert billions of dollars in funding and steal a decade or more in time from landing on the surface of another world. Eric Berger, Ars Technica, "NASA says it’s building a gateway to the Moon—critics say it’s just a gate," 6 Sep. 2018 To stare at an iPhone in front of a partner is to partake in some form of infidelity, whereby your attention is diverted from your loved one and redirected at hundreds of acquaintances and strangers. Carrie Battan, Harper's BAZAAR, "Escaping the Seduction of Your Smartphone," 26 July 2018 Cruz was also assigned to a controversial program that diverts troubled students to alternative schools over the criminal-justice system — critics contend the program encourages a culture of lax discipline. David Ovalle, miamiherald, "'All the signs were there.' On video, guard says school knew Parkland shooter posed threat," 5 June 2018 Part of the blame can be attributed to reformers who have downplayed the role that school spending plays in achievement, while advocating for funding charter schools and vouchers that divert funding from the public school system. Valerie Strauss, Washington Post, "What they said before and what they are saying now," 20 May 2018 Cutting them back to the trunks or limbs may actually allow the plantings to make more growth using the foods that would otherwise be diverted to the seed-forming portions. Tom Maccubbin, OrlandoSentinel.com, "Poor root system hinders plant growth," 19 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'divert.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of divert

15th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

History and Etymology for divert

Middle English, from Middle French & Latin; Middle French divertir, from Latin divertere to turn in opposite directions, from dis- + vertere to turn — more at worth

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Statistics for divert

Last Updated

21 Mar 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for divert

The first known use of divert was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for divert

divert

verb

English Language Learners Definition of divert

: to change the direction or use of (something)
: to take (attention) away from someone or something
: to take the attention of (someone) away from something or someone

divert

verb
di·​vert | \ də-ˈvərt How to pronounce divert (audio) , dī-\
diverted; diverting

Kids Definition of divert

1 : to turn from one path or use to another Police diverted traffic.
2 : to turn the attention away : distract Bagman opened his mouth to ask Harry something, but Percy diverted him.— J. K. Rowling, Goblet of Fire
3 : to give pleasure to : amuse Paint and paper diverted the children.
di·​vert | \ də-ˈvərt, dī- How to pronounce divert (audio) \

Legal Definition of divert

1 : to turn from one course or use to another funds illegally diverted
2 : to place (a defendant) under a diversion

Other Words from divert

diverter noun

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More from Merriam-Webster on divert

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with divert

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for divert

Spanish Central: Translation of divert

Nglish: Translation of divert for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of divert for Arabic Speakers

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