disparage

verb
dis·​par·​age | \ di-ˈsper-ij How to pronounce disparage (audio) , -ˈspa-rij\
disparaged; disparaging

Definition of disparage

transitive verb

1 : to depreciate (see depreciate sense 1) by indirect means (such as invidious comparison) : speak slightingly about religious beliefs disparaged as superstition
2 : to lower in rank or reputation : degrade

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Other Words from disparage

disparagement \ di-​ˈsper-​ij-​mənt How to pronounce disparagement (audio) , -​ˈspa-​rij-​ \ noun
disparager noun

Choose the Right Synonym for disparage

decry, depreciate, disparage, belittle mean to express a low opinion of. decry implies open condemnation with intent to discredit. decried their defeatist attitude depreciate implies a representing as being of less value than commonly believed. critics depreciate his plays for being unabashedly sentimental disparage implies depreciation by indirect means such as slighting or invidious comparison. disparaged polo as a game for the rich belittle usually suggests a contemptuous or envious attitude. belittled the achievements of others

Did You Know?

In Middle English, to disparage someone meant causing that person to marry someone of inferior rank. Disparage derives from the Anglo-French word desparager, meaning "to marry below one's class." Desparager, in turn, combines the negative prefix des- with parage ("equality" or "lineage"), which itself comes from per, meaning "peer." The original "marriage" sense of disparage is now obsolete, but a closely-related sense ("to lower in rank or reputation") survives in modern English. By the 16th century, English speakers (including Shakespeare) were also using disparage to mean simply "to belittle."

Examples of disparage in a Sentence

Voters don't like political advertisements in which opponents disparage one another. It's a mistake to disparage their achievements. The article disparaged polo as a game for the wealthy.
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Recent Examples on the Web

Bolsonaro has insulted adversaries and allies, disparaged women, black and gay people, and even praised his country's 1964-1985 dictatorship. Anchorage Daily News, "G-7 pledges funds to fight Amazon fires," 26 Aug. 2019 Bolsonaro has insulted adversaries and allies, disparaged women, black and gay people, and praised his country’s 1964-1985 dictatorship. Washington Post, "G-7 nations pledge $40 million to fight Amazon fires," 26 Aug. 2019 Bolsonaro has insulted adversaries and allies, disparaged women, black and gay people, and praised his country’s 1964-1985 dictatorship. Christopher Torchia, BostonGlobe.com, "G-7 nations pledge $40 million to fight Amazon fires," 26 Aug. 2019 The next clapback comes via an email written by a reader who disagreed with the article disparaging the Democratic Party. Michael Harriot, The Root, "The Root’s Clapback Mailbag: The Art of the Last-Minute Clapback," 26 Jan. 2018 Also, don’t openly disparage management or talk about bosses behind their backs, and don’t do anything to undermine their authority. Chris Woolston, Quartz at Work, "How to deal with an abusive boss," 29 Aug. 2019 To breeders and growers who had often heard Phylos employees publicly disparage Monsanto, affiliation with Syngenta and Dow/DuPont sounded like a deal with the devil. Hannah Wallace, WIRED, "High Drama: A Cannabis Biotech Company Roils Small Growers," 24 July 2019 The government had argued that Stone violated the judge's gag order with Instagram posts that disparaged the Mueller investigation and the broader election interference probe. NBC News, "Roger Stone avoids arrest for gag order violation, but has social media blackout imposed," 16 July 2019 Blackhorse and four other Native American plaintiffs wanted the trademarks of the team canceled under a provision in the Lanham Act which prohibits registration of marks that may disparage persons or bring them into contempt or disrepute. azcentral, "Another Supreme Court ruling backs Washington NFL team keeping their brand," 26 June 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'disparage.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of disparage

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for disparage

Middle English, to degrade by marriage below one's class, disparage, from Anglo-French desparager to marry below one's class, from des- dis- + parage equality, lineage, from per peer

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Statistics for disparage

Last Updated

17 Sep 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for disparage

The first known use of disparage was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for disparage

disparage

verb

English Language Learners Definition of disparage

formal : to describe (someone or something) as unimportant, weak, bad, etc.

disparage

verb
dis·​par·​age | \ di-ˈsper-ij How to pronounce disparage (audio) \
disparaged; disparaging

Kids Definition of disparage

: to speak of as unimportant or bad : belittle He disparaged the other team.

Other Words from disparage

disparagement \ -​mənt \ noun

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