disparage

verb
dis·​par·​age | \ di-ˈsper-ij How to pronounce disparage (audio) , -ˈspa-rij\
disparaged; disparaging

Definition of disparage

transitive verb

1 : to depreciate (see depreciate sense 1) by indirect means (such as invidious comparison) : speak slightingly about religious beliefs disparaged as superstition
2 : to lower in rank or reputation : degrade

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Other Words from disparage

disparagement \ di-​ˈsper-​ij-​mənt How to pronounce disparagement (audio) , -​ˈspa-​rij-​ \ noun
disparager noun

Choose the Right Synonym for disparage

decry, depreciate, disparage, belittle mean to express a low opinion of. decry implies open condemnation with intent to discredit. decried their defeatist attitude depreciate implies a representing as being of less value than commonly believed. critics depreciate his plays for being unabashedly sentimental disparage implies depreciation by indirect means such as slighting or invidious comparison. disparaged polo as a game for the rich belittle usually suggests a contemptuous or envious attitude. belittled the achievements of others

Did You Know?

In Middle English, to disparage someone meant causing that person to marry someone of inferior rank. Disparage derives from the Anglo-French word desparager, meaning "to marry below one's class." Desparager, in turn, combines the negative prefix des- with parage ("equality" or "lineage"), which itself comes from per, meaning "peer." The original "marriage" sense of disparage is now obsolete, but a closely-related sense ("to lower in rank or reputation") survives in modern English. By the 16th century, English speakers (including Shakespeare) were also using disparage to mean simply "to belittle."

Examples of disparage in a Sentence

Voters don't like political advertisements in which opponents disparage one another. It's a mistake to disparage their achievements. The article disparaged polo as a game for the wealthy.
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Recent Examples on the Web

Perhaps the toughest pill to swallow was Daenerys Targaryen's fall, which Khaleesi fans disparaged on Twitter. Erica Gonzales, Harper's BAZAAR, "Where Did Drogon Take Daenerys Targaryen in the Game of Thrones Finale?," 20 May 2019 Had Hillary Clinton won the 2016 election and nominated, say, CNN’s Christiane Amanpour to be ambassador to the U.N., would CNN commentators be disparaging her for lack of relevant experience? WSJ, "Progressive Privilege Prejudice and the U.N.," 16 Dec. 2018 His attempt to disparage and discredit his victims failed. Maryclaire Dale, The Seattle Times, "Bill Cosby behind bars: Appeal looming, lawsuits pending," 27 Sep. 2018 Amid all the other catastrophes in the United Kingdom right now, Prince Harry found the time to apparently disparage Fortnite. Hayden Dingman, PCWorld, "This week in games: Borderlands 3 is an Epic exclusive, Obsidian shows off The Outer Worlds," 5 Apr. 2019 Another shows that the IRA disparaged Clinton in nearly all of its social media pages on every platform, regardless of whether the page targeted conservatives, liberals, or racial and ethnic groups. Alex Ward, Vox, "4 main takeaways from new reports on Russia’s 2016 election interference," 17 Dec. 2018 According to the lawsuit, Phillips would also refuse to make a cake that is disparaging to the gay community. Kaitlyn Schallhorn, Fox News, "Colorado baker sues state, claims it's 'punishing' him for religious beliefs despite Supreme Court ruling," 15 Aug. 2018 Trump has reportedly also made comments disparaging poor countries. Chris Chavez, SI.com, "Report: Anti-U.S. Sentiment Could Put USA’s Joint 2026 World Cup Bid in Danger," 28 Feb. 2018 At issue, President Trump's comments disparaging immigrants from Haiti and Africa. Democrats were quick to condemn. SEN. NBC News, "Meet the Press - January 14, 2018," 14 Jan. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'disparage.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of disparage

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for disparage

Middle English, to degrade by marriage below one's class, disparage, from Anglo-French desparager to marry below one's class, from des- dis- + parage equality, lineage, from per peer

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Statistics for disparage

Last Updated

11 Jun 2019

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Time Traveler for disparage

The first known use of disparage was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for disparage

disparage

verb

English Language Learners Definition of disparage

formal : to describe (someone or something) as unimportant, weak, bad, etc.

disparage

verb
dis·​par·​age | \ di-ˈsper-ij How to pronounce disparage (audio) \
disparaged; disparaging

Kids Definition of disparage

: to speak of as unimportant or bad : belittle He disparaged the other team.

Other Words from disparage

disparagement \ -​mənt \ noun

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