disparage

verb
dis·​par·​age | \ di-ˈsper-ij How to pronounce disparage (audio) , -ˈspa-rij \
disparaged; disparaging

Definition of disparage

transitive verb

1 : to depreciate (see depreciate sense 1) by indirect means (such as invidious comparison) : speak slightingly about religious beliefs disparaged as superstition
2 : to lower in rank or reputation : degrade

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Other Words from disparage

disparagement \ di-​ˈsper-​ij-​mənt How to pronounce disparagement (audio) , -​ˈspa-​rij-​ \ noun
disparager noun

Choose the Right Synonym for disparage

decry, depreciate, disparage, belittle mean to express a low opinion of. decry implies open condemnation with intent to discredit. decried their defeatist attitude depreciate implies a representing as being of less value than commonly believed. critics depreciate his plays for being unabashedly sentimental disparage implies depreciation by indirect means such as slighting or invidious comparison. disparaged polo as a game for the rich belittle usually suggests a contemptuous or envious attitude. belittled the achievements of others

Did You Know?

In Middle English, to disparage someone meant causing that person to marry someone of inferior rank. Disparage derives from the Anglo-French word desparager, meaning "to marry below one's class." Desparager, in turn, combines the negative prefix des- with parage ("equality" or "lineage"), which itself comes from per, meaning "peer." The original "marriage" sense of disparage is now obsolete, but a closely-related sense ("to lower in rank or reputation") survives in modern English. By the 16th century, English speakers (including Shakespeare) were also using disparage to mean simply "to belittle."

Examples of disparage in a Sentence

Voters don't like political advertisements in which opponents disparage one another. It's a mistake to disparage their achievements. The article disparaged polo as a game for the wealthy.
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Recent Examples on the Web In the aftermath of the debate, Trump disparaged Kelly for being tough on him. Erica Gonzales, Harper's BAZAAR, "Your Cheat Sheet to the True Events in Bombshell," 14 Dec. 2019 The rally comes a day after Pelosi and other top Democrats walked out of a meeting with Trump at the White House after the president disparaged Pelosi. Author: John Wagner, Felicia Sonmez, Anchorage Daily News, "Mulvaney confirms Ukraine aid withheld in part over request to investigate Democrats," 17 Oct. 2019 The people here listened as Ruiz was disparaged in the buildup to the fight, as he was subjected to fat-shaming masquerading as analysis. Dylan Hernandez, latimes.com, "It's a big victory for Andy Ruiz Jr. and Imperial Valley," 22 June 2019 During the 2016 campaign, Sondland criticized Trump for disparaging Gold Star parents Khizr and Ghazala Khan, who spoke at the Democratic convention. USA TODAY, "Gordon Sondland makes splash as unlikely star witness in Trump impeachment inquiry," 21 Nov. 2019 Specifically, in addition to disparaging CNN and its journalists, the ad makes assertions that have been proven demonstrably false by various news outlets, including CNN. NBC News, "CNN refuses to air Trump ad targeting Biden over Ukraine," 3 Oct. 2019 In 2016, the same organization sought to help Donald Trump by disparaging Hillary Clinton, according to the special counsel Robert Mueller’s report on Russian interference in the campaign. San Diego Union-Tribune, "US targets Russia in first step against meddling in midterms," 30 Sep. 2019 That didn’t stop some people from disparaging the protest. John Wildermuth, San Francisco Chronicle, "2018 women’s marches get serious about a new political landscape," 19 Jan. 2018 As Vox reports, since its origination, e-girl has been used to disparage women. Bianca Nieves, Teen Vogue, "The Ultimate E-girl Starter Pack," 12 Dec. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'disparage.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of disparage

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for disparage

Middle English, to degrade by marriage below one's class, disparage, from Anglo-French desparager to marry below one's class, from des- dis- + parage equality, lineage, from per peer

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Time Traveler for disparage

Time Traveler

The first known use of disparage was in the 14th century

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Last Updated

22 Jan 2020

Cite this Entry

“Disparage.” The Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster Inc., https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/disparaged. Accessed 28 January 2020.

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More Definitions for disparage

disparage

verb
How to pronounce disparage (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of disparage

formal : to describe (someone or something) as unimportant, weak, bad, etc.

disparage

verb
dis·​par·​age | \ di-ˈsper-ij How to pronounce disparage (audio) \
disparaged; disparaging

Kids Definition of disparage

: to speak of as unimportant or bad : belittle He disparaged the other team.

Other Words from disparage

disparagement \ -​mənt \ noun

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