digest

noun
di·​gest | \ ˈdī-ˌjest How to pronounce digest (audio) \

Definition of digest

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a summation or condensation of a body of information: such as
a : a systematic compilation of legal rules, statutes, or decisions
b : a periodical devoted to condensed versions of previously published articles
2 : a product of digestion

digest

verb
di·​gest | \ dī-ˈjest How to pronounce digest (audio) , də- \
digested; digesting; digests

Definition of digest (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to distribute or arrange systematically : classify
2 : to convert (food) into absorbable form
3 : to take into the mind or memory especially : to assimilate mentally
4a : to soften, decompose, or break down by heat and moisture or chemical action DNA digested by restriction enzymes
b : to extract soluble ingredients from by warming with a liquid
5 : to compress into a short summary
6 : absorb sense 2 the capacity of the U.S. to digest immigrants

intransitive verb

1 : to digest food
2 : to become digested

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Examples of digest in a Sentence

Noun a digest of the laws a digest of yesterday's departmental meeting Verb He has trouble digesting certain foods. It will take me a while to digest this news.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The bill also requires a teacher preparation program to include curriculum that instructs teachers about social emotional learning practices that are helpful in supporting students who have experienced trauma, the digest says. Hannah Reed, chicagotribune.com, "New law a help to combat teacher shortage, also a test for quality of work: Longtime Gary representative has doubts," 29 Apr. 2021 Parasympathetic has two other states though- the rest and digest and according to the Polyvagal Theory, the ventral vagal branch of the parasympathetic which is social engagement. Womensmedia, Forbes, "What The Vagus Nerve Is And How To Stimulate It For Better Mental Health," 15 Apr. 2021 The Native American tribes in the South call the March full moon the Worm moon because of the earthworm casts, soil that the worms digest, become visible as the ground thaws. Megan Marples And Ashley Strickland, CNN, "See the 'Worm' supermoon glow in the sky this weekend," 28 Mar. 2021 The Venus flytrap is only one of several different kinds of carnivorous plants that have developed astonighing ways to catch and digest insects and other small animals. Scientific American, "The Plant Kingdom's Most Unusual Talents [Slide Show]," 11 Mar. 2021 The new system transformed hard-to-digest information on resident safety, staffing and dozens of other metrics into simple star ratings. New York Times, "Maggots, Rape and Yet Five Stars: How U.S. Ratings of Nursing Homes Mislead the Public," 13 Mar. 2021 These types of solutions turn countless lines of data that may exist in an Excel spreadsheet, presentations, PDFs and emails into actionable, easy-to-digest insights that make sense to commercial real estate professionals – not just data scientists. Oli Farago, Forbes, "Long-Term Investment In Technology Will Lead To Hybrid Work Environments Post-Pandemic," 3 Mar. 2021 Nielsen’s weekly streaming ratings are regularly dominated by past and current broadcast shows because audiences still want the lean-back, easy-to-digest story lines at which broadcast series excel. Josef Adalian, Vulture, "The Other Queen’s Gambit," 18 Feb. 2021 Another great technique for hacking into the rest and digest response is to chew gum. John Hudson, Wired, "If You Are Going to Survive, You Must Prepare to Fail," 11 Jan. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Taking into consideration their dietary habits, Chiu curated a selection of dishes for the elderly in his community that are easy to chew and digest. Heather Law And Harmeet Kaur, CNN, "What six Asian Americans are doing to fight hate in their communities," 23 Apr. 2021 That’s hard enough to explain, digest and enforce on its own. Evan Grant, Dallas News, "Evan Help Us: Who has the inside track to rotation spots, and what was up with that Rangers ticket ad?," 17 Mar. 2021 In some early experiments, scientists slurried the two types of microbes together to see if the protists would consume and digest the viruses, Brown said. Katherine J. Wu New York Times, Star Tribune, "Nothing eats viruses, right? Meet some hungry protists," 24 Sep. 2020 After seemingly endless rounds of interviews on Thursday, Dungee finally had time to digest her wild 24 hours. New York Times, "Chelsea Dungee Was Ready for Her W.N.B.A. (and Yacht?) Moment," 16 Apr. 2021 There’s a lot to digest, so check out our picks for the best true-crime shows, below. Christopher Rosa, Glamour, "The 29 Best True-Crime Shows You Can Stream on Netflix, Hulu, HBO, and More," 24 Mar. 2021 The fossilized find also contained gastroliths, or pebbles in the adult oviraptorosaur's abdominal region, revealing to researchers that these dinosaurs may have eaten stones to grind and digest food, reports CNN. Elizabeth Gamillo, Smithsonian Magazine, "For the First Time Ever, Archaeologists Unearth Fossil of Non-Avian Dinosaur Incubating a Nest of Eggs," 18 Mar. 2021 That’s a lot to digest, and as a season, fall 2021 doesn’t wrap up as succinctly as previous ones. Steff Yotka, Vogue, "10 Trends From the Fall 2021 Season That Predict Fashion’s Future," 16 Mar. 2021 Supervisor Nora Vargas, who co-sponsored the action, asked the board to continue the item until May 5 to give community members more time to digest it. San Diego Union-Tribune, "County supervisors delay vote on lifting barriers to tribes expanding their reservations," 7 Apr. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'digest.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of digest

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for digest

Noun

Middle English, systematic arrangement of laws, from Latin digesta, from neuter plural of digestus, past participle of digerere to arrange, distribute, digest, from dis- + gerere to carry

Verb

Middle English, from Latin digestus

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Time Traveler for digest

Time Traveler

The first known use of digest was in the 14th century

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Statistics for digest

Last Updated

5 May 2021

Cite this Entry

“Digest.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/digest. Accessed 12 May. 2021.

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More Definitions for digest

digest

noun

English Language Learners Definition of digest

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: information or a piece of writing that has been made shorter

digest

verb

English Language Learners Definition of digest (Entry 2 of 2)

: to change (food that you have eaten) by a biological process into simpler forms that can be used by the body
: to think over and try to understand (news, information, etc.)

digest

noun
di·​gest | \ ˈdī-ˌjest How to pronounce digest (audio) \

Kids Definition of digest

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: information in shortened form

digest

verb
di·​gest | \ dī-ˈjest How to pronounce digest (audio) , də- \
digested; digesting

Kids Definition of digest (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to change or become changed into simpler forms that can be used by the body digest a meal My dinner is still digesting.
2 : to think over and try to understand That's a lot of information to digest.

digest

noun
di·​gest | \ ˈdī-ˌjest How to pronounce digest (audio) \

Medical Definition of digest

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a product of digestion
di·​gest | \ dī-ˈjest How to pronounce digest (audio) , də- How to pronounce digest (audio) \

Medical Definition of digest (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to convert (food) into absorbable form
2a : to soften, decompose, or break down by heat and moisture or chemicals
b : to extract soluble ingredients from by warming with a liquid

intransitive verb

1 : to digest food
2 : to become digested

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digest

noun
di·​gest | \ ˈdī-ˌjest How to pronounce digest (audio) \

Legal Definition of digest

: a compilation of legal rules, statutes, or decisions systematically arranged

History and Etymology for digest

Latin digesta, from neuter plural of digestus, past participle of digerere to disperse, arrange

Comments on digest

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