deride

verb
de·​ride | \ di-ˈrīd How to pronounce deride (audio) , dē-\
derided; deriding

Definition of deride

transitive verb

1 : to laugh at or insult contemptuously got derided by a carnival clown
2 : to subject to usually bitter or contemptuous ridicule or criticism politicians deriding their opponents : to express a lack of respect or approval of were derided as the weaker sex

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Other Words from deride

derider noun
deridingly \ di-​ˈrī-​diŋ-​lē How to pronounce deridingly (audio) , dē-​ \ adverb

Choose the Right Synonym for deride

ridicule, deride, mock, taunt mean to make an object of laughter of. ridicule implies a deliberate often malicious belittling. consistently ridiculed everything she said deride suggests contemptuous and often bitter ridicule. derided their efforts to start their own business mock implies scorn often ironically expressed as by mimicry or sham deference. youngsters began to mock the helpless wino taunt suggests jeeringly provoking insult or challenge. hometown fans taunted the visiting team

Did You Know?

When deride was borrowed into English in the 16th century, it came to us by combining the prefix de- with ridēre, a Latin verb meaning "to laugh." Ridēre is also the ancestor of the English words risible ("laughable") and ridiculous. Of course, English has a number of words meaning "to laugh at unkindly"; in addition to deride, we have ridicule, mock, and taunt. Deride suggests laughter loaded with contemptuousness or bitterness, whereas ridicule implies a deliberate often malicious belittling ("consistently ridiculed everything she said"). Mock implies scorn often ironically expressed by mimicry or sham deference ("mocking the speaker's impassioned tones"). Taunt suggests jeeringly provoking insult or challenge ("hometown fans taunted the visiting team").

Examples of deride in a Sentence

my brothers derided our efforts, but were forced to eat their words when we won first place
Recent Examples on the Web Bloomberg, who in January derided Warren’s wealth tax plan as Venezuelan, would probably fare somewhat better than this crew. BostonGlobe.com, "Billionaires beware: Elizabeth Warren is coming for your candy.," 19 Oct. 2019 In January 2018, The Washington Post reported that Trump derided immigrants coming from Haiti, El Salvador, and African countries. Monti Datta, Quartz, "Three countries where Donald Trump is popular," 1 Oct. 2019 The two firms have looked to disrupt the unruly and colorful matatu bus system used by tens of thousands daily, but is still derided as chaotic and inconvenient. Abdi Latif Dahir, Quartz Africa, "Bus-hailing apps in Kenya are facing their first major regulatory challenge," 1 Oct. 2019 Like her Democratic rival, Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, Warren is demanding transformational change that Mr. Trump and his allies deride as socialism. CBS News, "Elizabeth Warren slams Trump as "corruption in the flesh"," 17 Sep. 2019 To many of people of color, there was never a question that the president, who has often derided Latinos, black people, women and Muslims during his time in office, had made yet another racist and cruel remark. Nicquel Terry Ellis, USA TODAY, "People of color are embracing self-care, activism after Trump's latest racist tweets," 27 July 2019 But the animation studio Gainax sought redemption from the fans who derided the anime’s heavily philosophical finale. Allegra Frank, Vox, "8 things to know about Neon Genesis Evangelion, the legendary anime now streaming on Netflix," 21 June 2019 By the mid-1980s, commentators regularly derided the failures of deinstitutionalization. Troy Rondinone, The Conversation, "A plan to monitor the mentally ill? History of mental illness and stigma provides insights," 12 Sep. 2019 Though he has been long derided by some in the media for his approach, which can blend gossip with more readily verifiable facts, Fire and Fury became a sensation in part because Wolff vouched for its veracity. Alex Shephard, The New Republic, "Is There a Right Way to Cover the Trump White House?," 6 June 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'deride.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of deride

circa 1526, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for deride

Latin deridēre, from de- + ridēre to laugh

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Time Traveler for deride

Time Traveler

The first known use of deride was circa 1526

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Last Updated

15 Nov 2019

Cite this Entry

“Deride.” The Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster Inc., https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/deriding. Accessed 22 November 2019.

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More Definitions for deride

deride

verb
How to pronounce deride (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of deride

formal : to talk or write about (someone or something) in a very critical or insulting way : to say that (someone or something) is ridiculous or has no value

deride

verb
de·​ride | \ di-ˈrīd How to pronounce deride (audio) \
derided; deriding

Kids Definition of deride

: to laugh at in scorn : make fun of : ridicule People once derided the idea that man could fly.

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More from Merriam-Webster on deride

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for deride

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with deride

Spanish Central: Translation of deride

Nglish: Translation of deride for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of deride for Arabic Speakers

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