deride

verb
de·​ride | \ di-ˈrīd How to pronounce deride (audio) , dē-\
derided; deriding

Definition of deride

transitive verb

1 : to laugh at or insult contemptuously got derided by a carnival clown
2 : to subject to usually bitter or contemptuous ridicule or criticism politicians deriding their opponents : to express a lack of respect or approval of were derided as the weaker sex

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Other Words from deride

derider noun
deridingly \ di-​ˈrī-​diŋ-​lē How to pronounce deridingly (audio) , dē-​ \ adverb

Choose the Right Synonym for deride

ridicule, deride, mock, taunt mean to make an object of laughter of. ridicule implies a deliberate often malicious belittling. consistently ridiculed everything she said deride suggests contemptuous and often bitter ridicule. derided their efforts to start their own business mock implies scorn often ironically expressed as by mimicry or sham deference. youngsters began to mock the helpless wino taunt suggests jeeringly provoking insult or challenge. hometown fans taunted the visiting team

Did You Know?

When deride was borrowed into English in the 16th century, it came to us by combining the prefix de- with ridēre, a Latin verb meaning "to laugh." Ridēre is also the ancestor of the English words risible ("laughable") and ridiculous. Of course, English has a number of words meaning "to laugh at unkindly"; in addition to deride, we have ridicule, mock, and taunt. Deride suggests laughter loaded with contemptuousness or bitterness, whereas ridicule implies a deliberate often malicious belittling ("consistently ridiculed everything she said"). Mock implies scorn often ironically expressed by mimicry or sham deference ("mocking the speaker's impassioned tones"). Taunt suggests jeeringly provoking insult or challenge ("hometown fans taunted the visiting team").

Examples of deride in a Sentence

my brothers derided our efforts, but were forced to eat their words when we won first place

Recent Examples on the Web

Republicans also derided the hearing as a political attack aimed at silencing one of Trump's most loyal aides. Anchorage Daily News, "House panel votes to authorize subpoena for Kellyanne Conway after she fails to show for hearing," 26 June 2019 The Trump administration also finds itself in the awkward position of demanding that Iran comply with a nuclear accord that the president has derided as the worst deal in history. Matthew Lee, The Denver Post, "U.S. sending more troops to Middle East as Iran tensions mount," 17 June 2019 Many derided the algorithms powering it as biased or faulty. Belabbes Benkredda, Quartz, "Facebook created our culture of echo chambers—and it killed the one thing that could fix it," 21 June 2019 The government’s apologists have been deriding them as out-of-touch sophisticates. The Economist, "Kazakhstan’s choreographed election goes off-script," 15 June 2019 While some people might deride social media as a waste of time, Busy Philipps parlayed her viral Instagram Stories following into a new career move. Cady Lang, Time, "The 25 Accounts to Follow For the Best Instagram Stories Right Now," 4 June 2019 The Green New Deal, as its name implies, is meant to be a restoration, a return to the sort of fairness, the human balance, the dignity of a working life wantonly abandoned and derided by so many of our leading politicians and commentators. Kevin Baker, Harper's magazine, "Where Our New World Begins," 10 May 2019 The influential American philosopher of mind John Searle of the University of California, Berkeley derides the idea as a form of panpsychism: crudely, a belief that mind and awareness infuse the whole cosmos. Quanta Magazine, "Neuroscience Readies for a Showdown Over Consciousness Ideas," 6 Mar. 2019 Some found that idea to be forward thinking, while others derided it as a gimmick. NBC News, "Snapchat's focus on the future is becoming a present-day struggle," 3 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'deride.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of deride

circa 1526, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for deride

Latin deridēre, from de- + ridēre to laugh

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Statistics for deride

Last Updated

12 Jul 2019

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Time Traveler for deride

The first known use of deride was circa 1526

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More Definitions for deride

deride

verb

English Language Learners Definition of deride

formal : to talk or write about (someone or something) in a very critical or insulting way : to say that (someone or something) is ridiculous or has no value

deride

verb
de·​ride | \ di-ˈrīd How to pronounce deride (audio) \
derided; deriding

Kids Definition of deride

: to laugh at in scorn : make fun of : ridicule People once derided the idea that man could fly.

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More from Merriam-Webster on deride

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with deride

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for deride

Spanish Central: Translation of deride

Nglish: Translation of deride for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of deride for Arabic Speakers

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