depress

verb
de·​press | \ di-ˈpres How to pronounce depress (audio) , dē-\
depressed; depressing; depresses

Definition of depress

transitive verb

1 obsolete : repress, subjugate
2a : to press down depress a typewriter key
b : to cause to sink to a lower position
3 : to lessen the activity or strength of drugs that may depress the appetite
4 : sadden, discourage don't let the news depress you
5 : to decrease the market value or marketability of

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Other Words from depress

depressible \ di-​ˈpre-​sə-​bəl How to pronounce depressible (audio) , dē-​ \ adjective

Examples of depress in a Sentence

The news seemed to depress him a little. I don't mean to depress you, but there's no way we can win. We were all depressed by the loss. You shouldn't let this kind of problem depress you. These changes could depress the economy. Market conditions are likely to depress earnings in the next quarter. depressing the price of a stock Slowly depress the car's brake pedal. Depress the “shift” key on your keyboard. The doctor will depress your tongue and look at your throat.
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Recent Examples on the Web

Springsteen played it against a gigantic American-flag backdrop: If the goal is to depress everyone à la Nebraska, don’t play ringing rock riffs to an image of Old Glory the size of a billboard. Kyle Smith, National Review, "Bruce Springsteen, Accidental Patriot," 4 June 2019 Relied upon for decades to depress growth in the government’s hiring of civil servants, federal contractors have become an auxiliary force that often does much of the same work as rank-and-file government staffers, but with secondhand job security. Neena Satija, The Seattle Times, "Federal contractors who lost health insurance during shutdown remain in limbo," 28 Jan. 2019 In particular, the study noted that Latina actresses are now in 7 percent of speaking roles on television—a record that, despite being an all-time high and up from 2016's 5 percent, is depressing in the grand scheme of things. Julyssa Lopez, Glamour, "Representation for Latina Actors Is at an All-Time High—But It's Still Not Enough," 11 Sep. 2018 These platforms are unlikely to do anything to depress the volume of reviews coming in, whether users offer huzzahs or a whole lot of hating. Neil Swidey, BostonGlobe.com, "The right way to complain when a business does you wrong," 3 Apr. 2018 As a reminder, all the quotes from the stars that hint at the final season have been really depressing. Katherine J. Igoe, Marie Claire, "There's More Bad News for 'Game of Thrones' Fans—And This Time, It's the Episode Length," 14 Mar. 2019 February 7, 2019: In an interview with Vogue, Justin revealed that he got depressed while out on tour. Tamara Fuentes, Seventeen, "11 Times Justin Bieber Opened Up About His Mental Health," 22 Mar. 2019 Restaurant Threat Given the massive scope of Walmart’s grocery business, the meals could depress sales at restaurant chains. Claire Zillman, Fortune, "Walmart Is Introducing Prepared Meals and Its Own Blue Apron-Like Kits Amid Grocery War With Amazon," 5 Mar. 2018 But no amount of depressing eggs could ruin the charm of enjoying a cup of coffee with a snow mountainscape brushing past the windows and an adorable couple sitting next to each other a few booths away looking out at the snow. Crystal Paul, The Seattle Times, "What it’s like to take a 35-hour ride on Amtrak’s Coast Starlight train from Los Angeles to Seattle," 29 Mar. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'depress.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of depress

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for depress

Middle English, from Middle French depresser, from Latin depressus, past participle of deprimere to press down, from de- + premere to press — more at press

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Statistics for depress

Last Updated

8 Jun 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for depress

The first known use of depress was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for depress

depress

verb

English Language Learners Definition of depress

: to make (someone) feel sad : to make (someone) depressed
: to decrease the activity or strength of (something)
formal : to press (something) down

depress

verb
de·​press | \ di-ˈpres How to pronounce depress (audio) \
depressed; depressing

Kids Definition of depress

1 : to press down Depress the “enter” key.
2 : to make sad or discouraged Don't let the news depress you.
3 : to lessen the activity or strength of Bad weather had depressed sales.

depress

transitive verb
de·​press | \ di-ˈpres How to pronounce depress (audio) \

Medical Definition of depress

1 : to diminish the activity, strength, or yield of able to depress irritability of the heart muscle by the use of such a drug as procaine
2 : to lower in spirit or mood

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More from Merriam-Webster on depress

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with depress

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for depress

Spanish Central: Translation of depress

Nglish: Translation of depress for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of depress for Arabic Speakers

Comments on depress

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