de novo

adverb or adjective

de no·​vo di-ˈnō-(ˌ)vō How to pronounce de novo (audio)
dā-,
dē-
: over again : anew
a case tried de novo

Examples of de novo in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web Under Section 706, some but not all cases permit a court to conduct its own de novo review of the facts or strike down actions for being insufficiently supported by evidence. Dan McLaughlin, National Review, 23 Jan. 2024 To a great extent this is intuitively obvious, as private alleles emerge de novo in families, and many French Canadian families have had many of generations separated from the ancestral homeland to accumulate distinctive markers specific to their lineage. Razib Khan, Discover Magazine, 30 Sep. 2013 Related: New study suggests people who tested negative for Covid-19 can still develop long Covid The recognition that long Covid is the latest emergence of an old syndrome and not a de novo new entity, while no panacea, augurs a fundamental reset of every aspect of societal response. Steven Phillips, STAT, 14 Sep. 2023 This is not relevant for de novo mutation, where the frequency is very low by definition. Razib Khan, Discover Magazine, 21 Oct. 2012 Additionally, a new derived allele segregating within one population at a high frequency is often a telltale marker of recent adaptation, as a de novo mutation in a specific locale turns out to be beneficial. Razib Khan, Discover Magazine, 11 Sep. 2013 Without the freedom of de novo protein design, Baker’s Death Star would never have gotten off the ground. Jonathon Keats, Discover Magazine, 30 Oct. 2018 Some early efforts to use deep learning for de novo protein design have not made use of large language models. Rob Toews, Forbes, 16 July 2023 In the United States, the FDA recently granted de novo classification to the PM-200. Nick Blackmer, Verywell Health, 11 Apr. 2023

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'de novo.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Latin

First Known Use

1536, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of de novo was in 1536

Dictionary Entries Near de novo

Cite this Entry

“De novo.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/de%20novo. Accessed 21 Apr. 2024.

Legal Definition

de novo

adverb or adjective
de no·​vo dē-ˈnō-vō, dā- How to pronounce de novo (audio)
: over again : as if for the first time: as
a
: allowing independent appellate determination of issues (as of fact or law)
a de novo review
b
: allowing complete retrial upon new evidence compare abuse of discretion, clearly erroneous

Note: A de novo review is an in-depth review. Decisions of federal administrative agencies are generally subject to de novo review in the U.S. District Courts, and some lower state court decisions are subject to de novo review at the next level.

Etymology

Medieval Latin, literally, from (the) new

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