currency

noun
cur·​ren·​cy | \ ˈkər-ən(t)-sē, ˈkə-rən(t)-\
plural currencies

Definition of currency

1a : circulation as a medium of exchange
b : general use, acceptance, or prevalence a story gaining currency
c : the quality or state of being current : currentness needed to check the accuracy and currency of the information
2a : something (such as coins, treasury notes, and banknotes) that is in circulation as a medium of exchange
b : paper money in circulation
c : a common article for bartering Furs were once used as currency.
d : a medium of verbal or intellectual expression … neither side possessed any currency but clichés …— Jan Struther

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Synonyms for currency

Synonyms

bread [slang], bucks, cabbage [slang], cash, change, chips, coin, dough, gold, green, jack [slang], kale [slang], legal tender, lolly [British], long green [slang], loot, lucre, money, moola (or moolah) [slang], needful, pelf, scratch [slang], shekels (also sheqels), tender, wampum

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Examples of currency in a Sentence

A new currency has been introduced in the foreign exchange market. They were paid in U.S. currency. Furs were once traded as currency. The word has not yet won widespread currency. I'm not sure about the accuracy and currency of their information.
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Recent Examples on the Web

Oil, gold, copper and other commodities have also felt the pressure of a stronger dollar: Most raw materials are priced in the U.S. currency and cost more for foreign buyers when the dollar appreciates. Ira Iosebashvili, WSJ, "U.S. Dollar Posted 4.3% Gain in 2018, but Don’t Expect That in 2019," 1 Jan. 2019 The drop in China’s currency likewise will exaggerate the effect of China’s retaliatory tariffs, making goods imported from the United States even more expensive for Chinese customers. Danielle Paquette, The Seattle Times, "New round of US-China tariffs raise fears of an economic Cold War," 18 Sep. 2018 When Bitcoin’s price spiked last year, many big financial institutions took an interest in the virtual currency as a new kind of investment and have looked to move it away from its unsavory associations. New York Times, "How Russian Spies Hid Behind Bitcoin in Hacking Campaign," 13 July 2018 Theft 2900 block of Northwest 106th Avenue in Sunrise, June 2, 5:37 p.m. Someone took a plastic jar containing approximately $50 in currency from the dresser in his bedroom. Sun-Sentinel.com, "Plantation, Sunrise area crime reports," 27 June 2018 In an indictment unsealed on Friday, authorities allege that Ryan Farace operated the business for nearly five years, taking payment in the digital currency Bitcoin and shipping the tranquilizer out through the Postal Service. Ian Duncan, baltimoresun.com, "Baltimore County man accused in $30 million dark web pain pill scheme," 23 June 2018 The Marvel and Disney blockbuster raked in more than $200 million, making it the second-biggest three-day weekend opening in China when measured in Chinese currency. Michael Holtz, The Christian Science Monitor, "In China, US films struggle against homegrown movies," 19 June 2018 In an interview at the New York Economic Club in March, Thiel wasn’t shy about his interest in the digital currency. Emily Stewart, Vox, "Steve Bannon’s post-Breitbart project is bitcoin because of course it is," 14 June 2018 Who is still paying her salary, and in what currency? Rena Gross, Billboard, "12 Big Revelations From 'Handmaid's Tale' Season 2, Episode 7," 30 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'currency.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of currency

1624, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for currency

curr(ent) entry 1 + -ency

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Statistics for currency

Last Updated

12 Jan 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for currency

The first known use of currency was in 1624

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More Definitions for currency

currency

noun

Financial Definition of currency

What It Is

Currency is a medium of exchange for goods or services within an economy.

How It Works

Currency can be either fiat or tied to an underlying asset. Fiat money has no intrinsic value and is backed by the full faith and credit of the issuing government. That is, this type of currency is not worth very much in terms of its value as a raw material. Most paper money is fiat money, and its value comes from what it represents rather than what it is. Asset-backed currencies tied to gold, silver or other valuable commodities are rare in present day markets.

Why It Matters

Currency serves an important role in an economy, and has three universally accepted economic advantages: it acts as a medium of exchange, a store of value, and a standard of value. Meaning it allows buyers and sellers to quickly arrive at comparative prices instead ofThe definition of currency on InvestingAnswers haggling over how many of one good is worth compared to an unlimited number of others.

It is important to remember, though, that fiat money is only as good as the organization that issues it. If the entity defaults, the currency is worthless.

Source: Investing Answers

currency

noun

English Language Learners Definition of currency

: the money that a country uses : a specific kind of money

: something that is used as money

: the quality or state of being used or accepted by many people

currency

noun
cur·​ren·​cy | \ ˈkər-ən-sē \
plural currencies

Kids Definition of currency

1 : common use or acceptance The idea has wide currency.
2 : money in circulation We were paid in the country's currency.

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Comments on currency

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