crypto

noun
cryp·​to | \ ˈkrip-(ˌ)tō How to pronounce crypto (audio) \
plural cryptos

Definition of crypto

 (Entry 1 of 2)
1 : a person who adheres or belongs secretly to a party, sect, or other group

crypto

adjective
Definition of crypto (Entry 2 of 2)
1 : not openly avowed or declared often used in combination crypto-fascist

Examples of crypto in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun For now, activity is predominantly monetized via individual customers who buy, sell and hold crypto via Coinbase. Telis Demos, WSJ, "Coinbase Offers Another Way to Ride the Bitcoin Roller Coaster," 4 Mar. 2021 James told members of the crypto industry in New York they must be registered with the Office of the Attorney General’s investor protection bureau. NBC News, "New York attorney general warns cryptocurrency industry: 'Play by the rules or we will shut you down'," 1 Mar. 2021 The original crypto asset bounced around this month as influencers weighed in. John Detrixhe, Quartz, "Bitcoin is worth whatever Elon Musk and Cathie Wood say it is," 24 Feb. 2021 Its core business provides digital custody, clearing, crypto and fractional share-trading services to other fintech firms, online brokerages and wealth managers. Dom Difurio, Dallas News, "Dallas-based fintech firm Apex Clearing will go public through SPAC valuing company at $4.7 billion," 22 Feb. 2021 Members of the House of Representatives, including former chair of the Judiciary Committee Bob Goodlatte, have disclosed owning crypto in the past, but no U.S. Senator has done so. Jeff John Roberts, Fortune, "Wyoming elects first Bitcoin owner to U.S. Senate," 4 Nov. 2020 For months BitMEX was the world’s largest crypto-derivatives exchange and is currently No. 2, behind Binance. Dave Liedtka, Bloomberg.com, "BitMEX Founders Charged With Failing to Prevent Laundering," 1 Oct. 2020 The case for a $75 billion valuation can also be justified by the degree to which Coinbase dominates the U.S. crypto industry. Jeff John Roberts, Fortune, "Coinbase is pegged for a valuation of up to $75 billion. Is that realistic?," 14 Jan. 2021 Still, the nascent crypto industry is optimistic that Gensler will be more open to digital assets than former SEC Chairman Jay Clayton, who was widely seen as an impediment to their adoption. Benjamin Bain, Bloomberg.com, "From Goldman to SEC: Gensler’s Next Stop Worries Wall Street," 14 Jan. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective These include a custody service for the growing number of institutions that want to safely store their crypto holdings, as well as a consumer debit card and lending products for cryptocurrency. Jeff John Roberts, Fortune, "Coinbase is pegged for a valuation of up to $75 billion. Is that realistic?," 14 Jan. 2021 Tether’s importance, and its value to the overall crypto economy, has vastly increased since then, when only a few billion Tethers were in circulation. Jacob Silverman, The New Republic, "Is Tether Just a Scam to Enrich Bitcoin Investors?," 13 Jan. 2021 Here’s what Tyler Cowen is thinking: The recent run-up in crypto values seems to be driven by the possibility that major corporations will start adding them to their balance sheets. Andrew Stuttaford, National Review, "Bubble, Bubble, but No Trouble (Yet)," 29 Dec. 2020 While Bitcoin eclipsed that mark several times in the past—most notably during the crypto bubble of late 2017 when the price brushed its all time high of $20,000—it has typically fallen below $10,000 just a few days or weeks later. Nicolas Rapp, Fortune, "Bitcoin surges to a 2020 high on PayPal’s embrace," 22 Oct. 2020 That falls well short of its all-time high of nearly $20,000, which occurred during the the crypto bubble of late 2017, after which Bitcoin fell to around $3,400 the following year. Jeff John Roberts, Fortune, "For years J.P. Morgan was skeptical of Bitcoin. Now the bank’s analysts say its value could triple, challenge gold," 26 Oct. 2020 But whether or not the crypto aspects of the Chagossians’ claim hold water, the islanders still hope to one day secure .io. David Meyer, Fortune, "‘Colonialism’ and crypto claims: Why the .io domain name extension faces an uncertain future," 31 Aug. 2020 Previously, only accredited investors -- who make up only 3% of all U.S. investors -- could benefit from early access to both traditional and crypto projects, Nguyen said. Matthew Leising, Bloomberg.com, "Crypto Push by Republic Investment Platform Sparked by New Token," 26 June 2020 But now, crypto firms—and by extension Bitcoin—have received an implicit stamp of approval from the financial lords of Wall Street. David Z. Morris, Fortune, "Coinbase and the future of IPOs," 13 May 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'crypto.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of crypto

Noun

1946, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Adjective

1681, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for crypto

Noun

(sense 1) independent use of crypto-; (sense 2) by shortening

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Last Updated

8 Mar 2021

Cite this Entry

“Crypto.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/crypto. Accessed 8 Mar. 2021.

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More Definitions for crypto

crypto

noun
cryp·​to | \ ˈkrip-(ˌ)tō How to pronounce crypto (audio) \

Medical Definition of crypto

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