crimson

noun
crim·​son | \ ˈkrim-zən How to pronounce crimson (audio) \

Definition of crimson

 (Entry 1 of 3)

: any of several deep purplish reds

crimson

adjective

Definition of crimson (Entry 2 of 3)

: of the color crimson

crimson

verb
crimsoned; crimsoning; crimsons

Definition of crimson (Entry 3 of 3)

transitive verb

: to make crimson

intransitive verb

: to become crimson especially : blush

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Synonyms for crimson

Synonyms: Verb

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Examples of crimson in a Sentence

Verb he crimsoned the minute he realized the foolishness of what he'd said
Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Other kousa dogwoods are outstanding as well; most turn a deep crimson-purple in autumn. oregonlive, 30 Aug. 2021 In Khwaja Burgha, members of Ahmadi’s family said there had been only one explosion and that the resulting fireball had partially burned a crimson Toyota SUV that was also in the driveway. Los Angeles Times, 30 Aug. 2021 Lizzo snapped back with a mock-serious lean-in as Horan turned an even deeper shade of crimson. Gil Kaufman, Billboard, 25 Aug. 2021 Sorel is a crimson-hued global tour: the hibiscus is from Morocco, clove from Brazil, cassia (sometimes called Chinese cinnamon) from Indonesia and ginger from Nigeria. Washington Post, 6 Aug. 2021 The crimson remains of an old, rotted log sit beside a simple footbridge over a trickling stream in the woods. oregonlive, 21 Aug. 2021 Swatches of crimson and beige cloth affixed to twine mimic laundry hung out to dry; a tiny heap of metal filings and a few stones make a neat bird’s nest. The New Yorker, 18 Aug. 2021 In the Oval Office, pale blue and cream have been replaced by Prussian blue, crimson and gold. Mary Elizabeth Andriotis, House Beautiful, 25 June 2021 In deep crimson, Petal Bouche Matte—the only lip product in makeup artist Violette’s new collection—is color perfection. Fiorella Valdesolo, WSJ, 4 June 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective So what’s a peach-loving girl to do when these crimson and gold-hued lovelies call from the produce aisle and the farmers market? Bake with them. Dawn Davis, Bon Appétit, 16 Sep. 2021 This picture is painted with broad crimson brush strokes across the canvas of our minds. Steve West, sun-sentinel.com, 10 Sep. 2021 Even today, a spice like saffron — whose crimson threads are the stigmas of Crocus sativus, only three to a flower, with tens of thousands of blossoms required to yield a pound, which can sell for as much as $5,000 — telegraphs a certain intent. New York Times, 6 Sep. 2021 Incarnadine is a rich, strong crimson color that blends well with equally dramatic hues like black or navy for a sumptuous look. Jessica Bennett, Better Homes & Gardens, 1 Sep. 2021 The crimson backdrop isn’t the only clue that Lewis is something other than an observer of pretty scenes. Washington Post, 20 Aug. 2021 Similarly, Kelis got up close and personal with her crimson faux locs, while reflecting on her journey. Akili King, Vogue, 6 June 2021 The team’s outfits looked similar to the others in the room as the arena lights gleamed off crystals crisscrossing their chests and down their crimson and white sleeves. Emily Adams, USA TODAY, 12 Aug. 2021 The team’s outfits looked similar to the others in the room as the arena lights gleamed off crystals crisscrossing their chests and down their crimson and white sleeves. Claire Galofaro, The Christian Science Monitor, 25 July 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'crimson.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of crimson

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined above

Adjective

15th century, in the meaning defined above

Verb

1609, in the meaning defined at transitive sense

History and Etymology for crimson

Noun, Adjective, and Verb

Middle English crimisin, from Old Spanish cremesín, from Arabic qirmizī, from qirmiz kermes

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Time Traveler for crimson

Time Traveler

The first known use of crimson was in the 15th century

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Dictionary Entries Near crimson

crimpy

crimson

crimson antimony

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Statistics for crimson

Last Updated

19 Sep 2021

Cite this Entry

“Crimson.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/crimson. Accessed 26 Sep. 2021.

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More Definitions for crimson

crimson

noun

English Language Learners Definition of crimson

: a deep purplish-red color

crimson

noun
crim·​son | \ ˈkrim-zən How to pronounce crimson (audio) \

Kids Definition of crimson

: a deep purplish red

More from Merriam-Webster on crimson

Nglish: Translation of crimson for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of crimson for Arabic Speakers

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