courage

noun
cour·​age | \ ˈkər-ij How to pronounce courage (audio) , ˈkə-rij\

Definition of courage

: mental or moral strength to venture, persevere, and withstand danger, fear, or difficulty

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Choose the Right Synonym for courage

courage, mettle, spirit, resolution, tenacity mean mental or moral strength to resist opposition, danger, or hardship. courage implies firmness of mind and will in the face of danger or extreme difficulty. the courage to support unpopular causes mettle suggests an ingrained capacity for meeting strain or difficulty with fortitude and resilience. a challenge that will test your mettle spirit also suggests a quality of temperament enabling one to hold one's own or keep up one's morale when opposed or threatened. her spirit was unbroken by failure resolution stresses firm determination to achieve one's ends. the resolution of pioneer women tenacity adds to resolution implications of stubborn persistence and unwillingness to admit defeat. held to their beliefs with great tenacity

Examples of courage in a Sentence

Eunice Kennedy Shriver … didn't buy into the propaganda of her day that women had to be soft and submissive. That took courage back then, because she grew up in a family that expected a lot from the boys and very little from the girls. — Maria Shriver, Time, 26 Oct. 2009 Sometimes when I debate whether to risk my individuality or conform, the memory of my son's picture brings me courage. — Sue Monk Kidd, Reader's Digest, August 1990 But as long as your courage holds out you may as well go right ahead making a fool of yourself. All brave men are fools. — Robert Frost 17 Apr. 1915, in Selected Letters of Robert Frost1964 She has the courage to support unpopular causes. It takes courage to stand up for your rights.
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Recent Examples on the Web

Students at Middlebury College gave the school’s administrators a lesson this week in the difference between cowardice and courage when dealing with a controversial speaker. The Editorial Board, WSJ, "Cowardice and Courage at Middlebury," 19 Apr. 2019 Players like Chuma give other players courage and confidence. Dave Skretta, The Seattle Times, "Auburn’s Chuma Okeke out with torn ACL in left knee," 30 Mar. 2019 Life throws all of us painful curveballs, and the only way to survive is to walk right through them with courage, grace, a forgiving spirit, and most of all, hope. Amanda Garrity, Good Housekeeping, "When Will 'When Calls the Heart' Be Back on TV? Hallmark Announces Season 6 Return Date," 10 Apr. 2019 When the good lord finally called, how to meet him with courage and with the joy of the promise of what lies ahead. Lauren Hubbard, Town & Country, "Read the Full Transcript of President George W. Bush's Eulogy for His Father," 5 Dec. 2018 Women stay silent, men stay in power, and the few with the courage to speak up are soon drowned out by a chorus of laughter. Anna North, Vox, "Trump’s mockery of Christine Blasey Ford perpetuates rape culture," 3 Oct. 2018 Madison Bumgarner is one of the few players with enough courage to take Major League Baseball to task for implementing too many rules changes over the last few years. Paul Sullivan, chicagotribune.com, "Giants' Madison Bumgarner likes strategy having no DH creates in National League," 30 June 2018 And the ripple effects of the women’s courage that day have turned into a tidal wave. Jason Schmidt, Glamour, "The Army of Women Who Took Down Larry Nassar," 30 Oct. 2018 These cities need to summon the political courage to build their fair share of housing. Kathleen Ronayne, The Seattle Times, "California governor scales back high-speed train," 12 Feb. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'courage.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of courage

14th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for courage

Middle English corage, from Anglo-French curage, from quer, coer heart, from Latin cor — more at heart

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More Definitions for courage

courage

noun

English Language Learners Definition of courage

: the ability to do something that you know is difficult or dangerous

courage

noun
cour·​age | \ ˈkər-ij How to pronounce courage (audio) \

Kids Definition of courage

: the ability to meet danger and difficulties with firmness

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More from Merriam-Webster on courage

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for courage

Spanish Central: Translation of courage

Nglish: Translation of courage for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of courage for Arabic Speakers

Comments on courage

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