couch

verb
\ ˈkau̇ch How to pronounce couch (audio) \
couched; couching; couches

Definition of couch

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to lay (oneself) down for rest or sleep The lion couched himself by a tree.
2 : to embroider (a design) by laying down a thread and fastening it with small stitches at regular intervals
3 : to place or hold level and pointed forward ready for use Couching his lance, he seated himself firmly in his saddle …— W. Somerset Maugham
4 : to phrase or express in a specified manner The comments were couched in strong terms.

intransitive verb

1 : to lie down or recline for sleep or rest the odd way a camel couches
2 : to lie in ambush The tiger couches in the thick grass, watching its prey move closer.

couch

noun

Definition of couch (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : an article of furniture for sitting or reclining
b : a couch on which a patient reclines when undergoing psychoanalysis
2 : the den of an animal (such as an otter)
on the couch
: receiving psychoanalytic treatment

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Examples of couch in a Sentence

Verb I'm trying to couch this delicately: I don't think we should date anymore. I couched behind the partition so as to avoid an awkward situation with my ex. Noun find yourself a place on the couch and make yourself at home
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb But Biden’s criticisms are often couched with a degree of deference. Joshua Brustein, Bloomberg.com, "Bernie Sanders vs. Joe Biden: Where They Stand on Tech Issues," 10 May 2020 This urge to accommodate oneself to new conditions, however unsavory, and perhaps—should the opportunity arise—to take advantage of them is visible throughout the film, and all the more galling for being couched in courtesy. Anthony Lane, The New Yorker, "The Hour of Reckoning Descends in “Mr. Klein”," 30 Aug. 2019 According to these men, couching Christian rights in broader religious-freedom language, as is common in Western countries, does not count. The Economist, "A useful stick Christians are persecuted in many places. Autocrats exploit this," 18 Dec. 2019 Laurent Berger, the head of the French Democratic Confederation of Labor, one of the country’s major unions, couched his movement’s actions in general terms in a recent interview with France’s LCI television. Washington Post, "France braces for massive strikes and transportation disruptions starting Dec. 5," 4 Dec. 2019 But even as most Democrats labored to couch their support for impeachment in terms of the Constitution and the separation of powers, some in their ranks argued that Trump deserved to be removed by Congress for his policies. Nicholas Fandos, BostonGlobe.com, "President Trump impeached by US House on 2 charges," 18 Dec. 2019 Also because its actions are couched in the esoteric language of the law. Bob Egelko, SFChronicle.com, "Federal-state split over cameras in courtrooms," 30 Nov. 2019 All of the proposals in the plan are tentative, and many — including the recommendation regarding surge pricing — are couched in calls for further studies. Brian M. Rosenthal, New York Times, "New York Is Urged to Consider Surge Pricing for Taxis," 30 Jan. 2020 And it gets couched under this bulls— about paying your dues. Tyler Aquilina, EW.com, "How assistants, and The Assistant, are challenging the culture of Hollywood," 12 Jan. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Twice since the stay-at-home order began, the family has piled onto bean bags and couches for living room sleepover parties. Katherine Rosman, New York Times, "One More Relationship Tested by the Pandemic: Siblings," 17 May 2020 The ladies’ rest room features a red couch shaped like a pair of lips; tall cans of aerosol hair spray are arranged by the sinks. Amanda Petrusich, The New Yorker, "Phoebe Bridgers’s Frank, Anxious Music," 17 May 2020 There are rooms with couches and huge television screens. David Jesse, Detroit Free Press, "Michigan colleges have to find way to safely house thousands of students on campus," 16 May 2020 Union leaves the room, and without hesitation, baby Kaavia hops right off the couch and to grab a cookie. Jasmine Grant, Essence, "Gabrielle Union's Daughter Kaavia Wasn't Here For The Fruit Snack Challenge," 14 May 2020 Being able to tuck the massager into a corner, under the couch or into your travel bag allows for greater accessibility — and probably more frequent use. Stephanie Mansour, NBC News, "Best electric massagers for the back and neck, according to experts," 13 May 2020 In the background was a right-sized plump couch, uncluttered book shelves and a glass coffee table with a chess set on top. John Tuohy, Indianapolis Star, "Take-aways from the Democrat 5th District congressional debate," 13 May 2020 Spending nearly a month on the couch chowing down on antivirals, opiates, vitamins, and every season of RuPaul’s Drag Race gave me a lot of time to think about it. Marissa A. Ross, Bon Appétit, "Everything Is Different So I'm Drinking a Wine That Doesn't Change," 12 May 2020 One of the features of the new taproom was the mezzanine where couches and other seating would be open to patrons. Kathy Flanigan, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "'Whatever it takes': Milwaukee taprooms are looking for ways to reopen smartly, and safely," 8 May 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'couch.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of couch

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for couch

Verb

Middle English, from Anglo-French cucher, from Latin collocare to set in place — more at collocate

Noun

Middle English couche bed, from Anglo-French kuche, from cucher

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Time Traveler for couch

Time Traveler

The first known use of couch was in the 14th century

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Statistics for couch

Last Updated

20 May 2020

Cite this Entry

“Couch.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/couch. Accessed 28 May. 2020.

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More Definitions for couch

couch

verb
How to pronounce couch (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of couch

 (Entry 1 of 2)

formal : to say or express (something) in a particular way

couch

noun

English Language Learners Definition of couch (Entry 2 of 2)

: a long piece of furniture on which a person can sit or lie down
: a piece of furniture for a patient to lie on at a doctor's office

couch

noun
\ ˈkau̇ch How to pronounce couch (audio) \

Kids Definition of couch

: a long piece of furniture that a person can sit or lie on
\ ˈkau̇ch How to pronounce couch (audio) \

Medical Definition of couch

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to treat (a cataract or a person who has a cataract) by displacing the lens of the eye into the vitreous body

couch

noun

Medical Definition of couch (Entry 2 of 2)

: an article of furniture used (as by a patient undergoing psychoanalysis) for sitting or reclining
on the couch
: receiving psychiatric treatment

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More from Merriam-Webster on couch

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for couch

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with couch

Spanish Central: Translation of couch

Nglish: Translation of couch for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of couch for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about couch

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