corridor

noun

cor·​ri·​dor ˈkȯr-ə-dər How to pronounce corridor (audio)
ˈkär-,
-ˌdȯr
1
a
: a passageway (as in a hotel or office building) into which compartments or rooms open
b
: a place or position in which especially political power is wielded through discussion and deal-making
was excluded from the corridors of power after losing the election
2
: a usually narrow passageway or route: such as
a
: a narrow strip of land through foreign-held territory
b
: a restricted lane for air traffic
c
: a land path used by migrating animals
3
a
: a densely populated strip of land including two or more major cities
… the Northeast corridor stretching from Washington into New England … S. D. Browne
b
: an area or stretch of land identified by a specific common characteristic or purpose
a corridor of liberalism
the city's industrial corridor

Example Sentences

They pushed me down the hospital corridor to the operating room. A corridor of land lies between the two mountain ranges.
Recent Examples on the Web The water will be shared on an ongoing basis in Richfield's northeast corridor, located between Interstate 41, Holy Hill Road, Highway 175 and Pleasant Hill Road. Quinn Clark, Journal Sentinel, 9 Nov. 2022 On November 24, 1922, it was cleared to reveal a corridor, followed by a 30-foot-long passageway that ended in another door. Zach Zorich, Scientific American, 4 Nov. 2022 Tensions are also rising over the future of the Black Sea grain deal, with Russia claiming the corridor – which allows the safe passage of grain and oilseeds to reach global markets – is suspended. Alexandra Meeks, CNN, 1 Nov. 2022 Ukraine grain exports had recovered near to prewar levels after the reopening of the Black Sea corridor, which had always carried the majority of the country’s agricultural products. Jared Malsin, WSJ, 31 Oct. 2022 In Russia in 1982, over 60 Russian fans were killed after police channeled them through a single stadium corridor, jamming and crushing people in the small space as some ran back to watch a late goal. Sammy Westfall, Washington Post, 2 Oct. 2022 Yumi led me along a corridor lined on one side by white shelves, bare except for some ivy curling down from flower boxes, and up a flight of stairs. Mary Norris, The New Yorker, 15 Sep. 2022 The city's northeast corridor, where the center is located, was selected last year as the target of a $2.45 million initiative to improve nutritious food access with the help of the Equitable Food Access Initiative. Sarah Nelson, The Indianapolis Star, 7 Sep. 2022 Record-breaking temperatures are once again on tap for Oakland and residents in communities along the I-880 corridor, including Alameda. Gerry Díaz, San Francisco Chronicle, 7 Sep. 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'corridor.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

Word History

Etymology

earlier "covered passageway, path surrounding fortifications," borrowed from French, borrowed from regional Italian (by-form of Tuscan corridoio), from correre "to run" (going back to Latin currere) + -idore, going back to Latin -i-tōrium (from -i- -i- + -tōrium, suffix of place, from neuter of -tōrius, adjective derivative of -tōr-, -tor, agent suffix) — more at current entry 1

First Known Use

1719, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Time Traveler
The first known use of corridor was in 1719

Dictionary Entries Near corridor

Cite this Entry

“Corridor.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/corridor. Accessed 2 Dec. 2022.

Kids Definition

corridor

noun

cor·​ri·​dor ˈkȯr-əd-ər How to pronounce corridor (audio)
ˈkär-,
-ə-ˌdȯ(ə)r
1
: a passageway (as in a school) into which compartments or rooms open
2
: a narrow strip of land especially through territory held by an enemy

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