correct

verb
cor·​rect | \ kə-ˈrekt How to pronounce correct (audio) \
corrected; correcting; corrects

Definition of correct

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to make or set right : amend correct an error The editor corrected the author's manuscript.
b : counteract, neutralize correct a harmful tendency
c : to alter or adjust so as to bring to some standard or required condition correct a lens for spherical aberration She's having surgery to correct her vision.
2a : to discipline or punish (someone) for some fault or lapse … I was most rude then. Only a small boy, Sir, and I was corrected for it, I assure you, by my father …— Rex Ingamells
b : to point out usually for amendment the errors or faults of spent the day correcting tests

correct

adjective

Definition of correct (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : conforming to an approved or conventional standard correct behavior
2 : conforming to or agreeing with fact, logic, or known truth a correct response
3 : conforming to a set figure enclosed the correct return postage
4 : conforming to the strict requirements of a specific ideology or set of beliefs or values environmentally correct spiritually correct

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Other Words from correct

Verb

correctable \ kə-​ˈrek-​tə-​bəl How to pronounce correctable (audio) \ adjective
corrector \ kə-​ˈrek-​tər How to pronounce corrector (audio) \ noun

Adjective

correctly \ kə-​ˈrek(t)-​lē How to pronounce correctly (audio) \ adverb
correctness \ kə-​ˈrek(t)-​nəs How to pronounce correctness (audio) \ noun

Synonyms & Antonyms for correct

Synonyms: Verb

amend, debug, emend, rectify, red-pencil, reform, remedy

Synonyms: Adjective

accurate, bang on [chiefly British], dead-on, exact, good, on-target, precise, proper, right, so, spot-on, true, veracious

Antonyms: Adjective

false, improper, inaccurate, incorrect, inexact, off, untrue, wrong

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Choose the Right Synonym for correct

Verb

correct, rectify, emend, remedy, redress, amend, reform, revise mean to make right what is wrong. correct implies taking action to remove errors, faults, deviations, defects. correct your spelling rectify implies a more essential changing to make something right, just, or properly controlled or directed. rectify a misguided policy emend specifically implies correction of a text or manuscript. emend a text remedy implies removing or making harmless a cause of trouble, harm, or evil. set out to remedy the evils of the world redress implies making compensation or reparation for an unfairness, injustice, or imbalance. redress past social injustices amend, reform, revise imply an improving by making corrective changes, amend usually suggesting slight changes amend a law , reform implying drastic change plans to reform the court system , and revise suggesting a careful examination of something and the making of necessary changes. revise the schedule

synonyms see in addition punish

Adjective

correct, accurate, exact, precise, nice, right mean conforming to fact, standard, or truth. correct usually implies freedom from fault or error. correct answers socially correct dress accurate implies fidelity to fact or truth attained by exercise of care. an accurate description exact stresses a very strict agreement with fact, standard, or truth. exact measurements precise adds to exact an emphasis on sharpness of definition or delimitation. precise calibration nice stresses great precision and delicacy of adjustment or discrimination. makes nice distinctions right is close to correct but has a stronger positive emphasis on conformity to fact or truth rather than mere absence of error or fault. the right thing to do

Adjective

correct, exact, and accurate mean agreeing with a fact, truth, or standard. correct is used for something that contains no errors. Can you give me correct directions? exact is used for something that agrees very closely with fact or truth. I need the exact measurements of the room. accurate is used when great care has been taken to make sure that something agrees with the facts. He gave an accurate description of the scene.

Examples of correct in a Sentence

Verb

I hate it when she corrects my grammar. Please correct your essay for punctuation errors. Our teacher hasn't finished correcting our tests yet. He corrects papers with a red pen. We are finding ways to correct this difficult situation. We'll correct the problem with the circuit as soon as possible. These medicines are used for correcting chemical imbalances in the brain.

Adjective

What's the correct answer to this question? Her watch never tells the correct time. an anatomically correct drawing of the human body Did I give you the correct change? With the correct amount of water and sunlight, the plant will grow well.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

This story has been corrected to reflect the temporary BWC budget will be funded for 30 days, not 17 days. Andrew J. Tobias, cleveland.com, "Ohio legislature OKs band-aid budget after missing legal deadline," 30 June 2019 Nathan Kenworthy, Longmont Editor’s Note: Caldara’s column has been corrected to reflect that Longmont took on about $45 million in debt. Dp Opinion, The Denver Post, "Letters: Photo dehumanized a father and child who tragically drowned; Voters are telling cities to compete in certain markets (6/27/19)," 27 June 2019 In this way, a series of triangulation points could be mapped, and the van could proceed to the satellite by a zigzag path, stopping every twenty miles to correct any error. David Canfield, EW.com, "First Look: The Andromeda Strain is back with a new look for its 50th anniversary," 26 June 2019 But solving such problems would require 100,000 qubits and the means to correct errors in the delicate quantum waves. Adrian Cho, Science | AAAS, "How to evaluate computers that don’t quite exist," 26 June 2019 Though the call was technically correct, VAR should be used to correct obvious errors — not take over the on-field officials’ jobs. Andrew Joseph, For The Win, "Cameroon players were furious after questionable VAR ruling took away a goal," 23 June 2019 Samsung has since corrected its press release to say that the handset actually has dual back cameras. Jon Porter, The Verge, "Samsung’s updated A-series phones are coming to the US, starting at $179.99," 11 June 2019 This story has been corrected in the fourth paragraph to show that Curve has around 500,000 users, instead of more than 500,000. John Detrixhe, Quartz, "We are “very close” to peak fintech, with more than 10,000 startups jumping into the boom," 5 June 2019 To correct the errors that were caught in advance, Folsom High student yearbook staffers and alumni spent hours dissolving them with acetone and covering them with stickers provided by Jostens. Sawsan Morrar, sacbee, "Folsom student said ‘cracker’ in her senior quote – and sparked a debate about diversity," 4 June 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective

Hickenlooper is correct in making this claim, but neglects to mention that the program went into effect under his predecessor, Democratic Gov. Bill Ritter, in 2009. NBC News, "Fact checking Night Two of the first Democratic debate," 28 June 2019 Rueda is inarguably correct in saying that the player had arrived at an unbalanced Manchester United and that he is treated with more love with Chile. SI.com, "Alexis Sanchez: Man Utd Flop Gets More 'Love' With Chile But That's Not the Only Issue," 28 June 2019 While Castro was correct in saying that the Trump administration had used the criminal law in a far more aggressive way than its predecessors, the law that makes unauthorized border crossings a criminal offense has been on the books for decades. Janet Hook, latimes.com, "This is not your father's Democratic Party: Debate shows how leftward it has moved," 26 June 2019 The district did not immediately provide what the correct number of incidents was for that school year, forwarding the request for the information to Northside ISD's open records specialist. Dallas News, "Texas schools are underreporting when students are restrained, federal watchdog finds," 25 June 2019 Judging by the immediate response of the partisan Tory press this weekend, Johnson is correct in his surmise that what goes on in his personal life remains between him, his girlfriend, and possibly his divorce lawyer. Rebecca Mead, The New Yorker, "Will Boris Johnson’s “Late-Night Altercation” Sink His Bid to Become Prime Minister?," 23 June 2019 Speaking to reporters, Pelosi said she was convinced that U.S. intelligence was correct in its assessment that the drone was in international airspace. Fox News, "Situation Room briefing on Iran crisis concludes, as McConnell says 'measured' response is coming," 21 June 2019 The sisters’ hunch at the hospital had been correct. nola.com, "He died after the family took him off life support; then he walked through the door," 15 June 2019 Surely, Diamond is correct that its national identity, core values, problem-solving skills, and self-appraisal mattered. Daniel Immerwahr, The New Republic, "All Over the Map," 11 June 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'correct.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of correct

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Adjective

1668, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for correct

Verb

Middle English, from Latin correctus, past participle of corrigere, from com- + regere to lead straight — more at right

Adjective

Middle English, corrected, from Latin correctus, from past participle of corrigere — see correct entry 1

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Statistics for correct

Last Updated

4 Jul 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for correct

The first known use of correct was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for correct

correct

verb

English Language Learners Definition of correct

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to change (something) so that it is right, true, proper, etc. : to make (something) correct
: to mark the errors on (something that a person has written)
: to deal with or take care of (a problem, bad situation, etc.) successfully

correct

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of correct (Entry 2 of 2)

: true or accurate : agreeing with facts
: having no errors or mistakes
: proper or appropriate in a particular situation

correct

verb
cor·​rect | \ kə-ˈrekt How to pronounce correct (audio) \
corrected; correcting

Kids Definition of correct

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to make or set right Please correct any misspelled words.
2 : to change or adjust so as to bring to some standard or to a required condition My watch was slow, so I corrected it. Glasses will correct your vision.
3 : to punish in order to improve … Buldeo went out angrily … anxious to correct Mowgli for not taking better care of the herd.— Rudyard Kipling, The Jungle Book
4 : to show how a thing can be improved or made right She corrected the students' papers.

correct

adjective

Kids Definition of correct (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : free from mistakes : accurate the correct answer
2 : meeting or agreeing with some standard : appropriate correct behavior correct dress for school

Other Words from correct

correctly adverb
correctness noun

correct

transitive verb
cor·​rect | \ kə-ˈrekt How to pronounce correct (audio) \

Medical Definition of correct

: to alter or adjust so as to bring to some standard or required condition correct a lens for spherical aberration

Other Words from correct

correctable \ -​ˈrek-​tə-​bəl How to pronounce correctable (audio) \ adjective

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More from Merriam-Webster on correct

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with correct

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for correct

Spanish Central: Translation of correct

Nglish: Translation of correct for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of correct for Arabic Speakers

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