conjure

verb
con·​jure | \ transitive sense 2 & intransitive senses ˈkän-jər How to pronounce conjure (audio) also ˈkən- How to pronounce conjure (audio) ; transitive sense 1 kən-ˈju̇r How to pronounce conjure (audio) \
conjured; conjuring\ ˈkänj-​riŋ How to pronounce conjuring (audio) , ˈkän-​jə-​ , ˈkənj-​ , ˈkən-​jə-​ ; kən-​ˈju̇r-​iŋ \

Definition of conjure

transitive verb

1 : to charge or entreat earnestly or solemnly "I conjure you … to weigh my case well … "— Sheridan Le Fanu
2a : to summon by or as if by invocation or incantation
b(1) : to affect or effect by or as if by magic
(2) : imagine, contrive often used with upWe conjure up our own metaphors for our own needs …— R. J. Kaufmannconjured up a clever plan to raise the money
(3) : to bring to mind words that conjure pleasant images often used with upconjure up memories

intransitive verb

1a : to summon a devil or spirit by invocation or incantation
b : to practice magical arts … prayed and conjured, but all was useless …— Herman Melville
2 : to use a conjurer's tricks : juggle
conjure with
chiefly British : to treat or regard as important Victor Hugo is a name to conjure with— Peter France

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Examples of conjure in a Sentence

a magician who conjures live doves from silk scarves The students conjured a clever scheme to raise the money they needed.
Recent Examples on the Web Jeep buyers surely prefer to conjure mental images of the eponymous California desert, or river, or maybe a colorful headband. Dan Neil, WSJ, "Why Jeep Should Change Its Problematic Monikers," 26 June 2020 Sunday, the day devoted to dads may conjure up thoughts of George Floyd, a father whose death in police custody ignited nation-wide protests demanding justice and racial equality. Erin Jensen, USA TODAY, "5 meaningful Father's Day ideas amid Black Lives Matter, Pride Month and the COVID-19 pandemic," 18 June 2020 In the deep recesses of the nose are millions of sensory neurons that, along with our eyes and ears, help conjure the world around us. Bret Stetka, Scientific American, "The Brain Interprets Smell like the Notes of a Song," 18 June 2020 Senate Republicans also tried to conjure up the three-fifths vote required to override the veto of SB 354 but failed with a final vote of 28-21. Nyamekye Daniel, Washington Examiner, "Bill to increase teacher pay, provide bonuses heads to Cooper's desk," 18 June 2020 But Shaw can conjure stories and images of so much more — the once-thriving black community that stood on this same ground, destroyed nearly a century ago by white violence and ensuing decades of repression. Ellen Knickmeyer, Anchorage Daily News, "Near Trump’s rally site, black Tulsa lives with fiery legacy," 17 June 2020 For many, the Hamptons conjure visions of Upper East Siders summering in their mansions, and high society parties. Alex Erdekian, Condé Nast Traveler, "7 Easy Weekend Trips from NYC," 17 June 2020 But that’s the mood the director Josephine Decker wants to conjure in Shirley—one where even a mundane home has a distinct air of spookiness. David Sims, The Atlantic, "An Unconventional Biopic About a Horror Master," 8 June 2020 Taken literally, calls to defund police departments conjure images of empty precinct stations and the proliferation of citizen patrols. NBC News, "What would it mean to 'defund the police'? These cities offer ideas," 8 June 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'conjure.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of conjure

13th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for conjure

Middle English, from Anglo-French conjurer, from Latin conjurare to join in taking an oath, from com- + jurare to swear — more at jury

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Learn More about conjure

Time Traveler for conjure

Time Traveler

The first known use of conjure was in the 13th century

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Statistics for conjure

Last Updated

8 Jul 2020

Cite this Entry

“Conjure.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/conjure. Accessed 13 Jul. 2020.

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More Definitions for conjure

conjure

verb
How to pronounce conjure (audio) How to pronounce conjure (audio) How to pronounce conjure (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of conjure

: to make (something) appear or seem to appear by using magic
: to make you think of (something)
: to create or imagine (something)

conjure

verb
con·​jure | \ ˈkän-jər How to pronounce conjure (audio) , ˈkən-jər \
conjured; conjuring

Kids Definition of conjure

1 : to practice magical arts
2 : imagine sense 1 conjure up an image
3 : to produce by or as if by magic Conjuring up portable, waterproof fires was a specialty of Hermione's.— J. K. Rowling, Chamber of Secrets

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More from Merriam-Webster on conjure

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for conjure

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with conjure

Spanish Central: Translation of conjure

Nglish: Translation of conjure for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of conjure for Arabic Speakers

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