collude

verb
col·​lude | \ kə-ˈlüd How to pronounce collude (audio) \
colluded; colluding; colludes

Definition of collude

intransitive verb

: to work together secretly especially in order to do something illegal or dishonest : conspire, plot It was arithmetically possible, too, for a handful of senators … to collude with the president to approve a treaty betraying some vital interest to a foreign power.— Jack N. Rakove … the travails of the world's two biggest art-auction businesses, … rivals that now stand accused by the U.S. Justice Department of colluding to rig the auction market by fixing their sales-commission rates.— Robert Hughes … argues that while the kids are not entitled to collective representation, major universities are permitted to collude to prevent players from being paid for their work.— David Sirota

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Collude Has Latin Roots

Our English "lude" words (allude, collude, delude, elude, and prelude) are based on the Latin verb ludere, meaning "to play." Collude dates back to 1525 and combines ludere and the prefix col-, meaning "with" or "together." The verb is younger than the related noun collusion, which appeared sometime in the 14th century with the specific meaning "secret agreement or cooperation." Despite their playful history, collude and collusion have always suggested deceit or trickery rather than good-natured fun.

Examples of collude in a Sentence

The two companies had colluded to fix prices. accused of colluding to block the sale of the vacant land
Recent Examples on the Web Another was a claim that Democrats colluded with Ukraine to release information on former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort during the 2016 election. BostonGlobe.com, "A wealthy Venezuelan hosted Giuliani amid the Ukraine campaign. Then Giuliani lobbied on his behalf. - The Boston Globe," 27 Nov. 2019 Another was a claim that Democrats colluded with Ukraine to release information on former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort during the 2016 election. Matt Zapotosky, Washington Post, "A wealthy Venezuelan hosted Giuliani as he pursued Ukraine campaign. Then Giuliani lobbied the Justice Department on his behalf.," 26 Nov. 2019 Another was a claim that Democrats colluded with Ukraine to release information on former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort during the 2016 election. Anchorage Daily News, "A wealthy Venezuelan hosted Giuliani as he pursued Ukraine campaign. Then Giuliani lobbied the Justice Department on his behalf.," 26 Nov. 2019 The report found that while there was no evidence the campaign colluded with Russia to swing the election, Trump could not be cleared of trying to obstruct the investigation . Mary Clare Jalonick, The Denver Post, "Mueller’s testimony poses risk for Trump, but also Democrats," 20 July 2019 The report looked at Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election but found no evidence that Trump colluded with the foreign government in an effort to get elected. Fox News, "Russian oligarch says he spent $20M after McCabe asked him to help free retired FBI agent from Iran," 3 July 2019 Robert Mueller appears ready to produce evidence that the Trump campaign colluded with Russia to help win the presidency. Ezra Klein, Vox, "A new theory for why Republicans and Democrats see the world differently," 18 Dec. 2018 Oligopolies have colluded to fix prices in industries from drugs to poultry. The Economist, "Don’t blame market-friendly policies for Latin America’s discontent," 31 Oct. 2019 For decades, museums have colluded to soften the public image of toxic funders, to disconnect the vicious sources of their wealth from its salubrious potency to fund art (even though such funding is almost always underwritten at taxpayer expense). Rhonda Lieberman, The New Republic, "Painting Over the Dirty Truth," 23 Sep. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'collude.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of collude

1525, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for collude

Latin colludere, from com- + ludere to play, from ludus game — more at ludicrous

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Time Traveler for collude

Time Traveler

The first known use of collude was in 1525

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Statistics for collude

Last Updated

1 Dec 2019

Cite this Entry

“Collude.” The Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster Inc., https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/colluding. Accessed 7 December 2019.

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More Definitions for collude

collude

verb
How to pronounce collude (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of collude

: to work with others secretly especially in order to do something illegal or dishonest
col·​lude | \ kə-ˈlüd How to pronounce collude (audio) \
colluded; colluding

Legal Definition of collude

: to agree or cooperate secretly for a fraudulent or otherwise illegal purpose

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Comments on collude

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