college

noun, often attributive
col·​lege | \ ˈkä-lij How to pronounce college (audio) \

Definition of college

1 : a body of clergy living together and supported by a foundation
2 : a building used for an educational or religious purpose
3a : a self-governing constituent body of a university offering living quarters and sometimes instruction but not granting degrees Balliol and Magdalen Colleges at Oxford

called also residential college

b : a preparatory or high school
c : an independent institution of higher learning offering a course of general studies leading to a bachelor's degree a liberal arts college also : a university division offering this
d : a part of a university offering a specialized group of courses the university's college of pharmacy
e : an institution offering instruction usually in a professional, vocational, or technical field business college an embalming college
4 : company, group specifically : an organized body of persons engaged in a common pursuit or having common interests or duties a college of cardinals serving as papal councillors and electors
5a : a group of persons considered by law to be a unit
b : a body of electors — compare electoral college
6 : the faculty, students, or administration of a college The college was at the football game in force.

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Examples of college in a Sentence

She teaches art at a local college. He graduated from one of the country's best colleges. She attended a business college. He attended college for several years, but didn't graduate. She dropped out of college. I went to Mount Holyoke College. When I was a junior in college, I spent a semester in Spain. the Edinburgh College of Art the London College of Fashion She is attending fashion college.
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Recent Examples on the Web

Brian Lang, the principal and vice chancellor of their college, St. Andrews University. Kayleigh Roberts, Marie Claire, "The Head of Prince William and Kate Middleton's College Predicted Their Marriage," 4 May 2019 The YouTube description also has a few scant details about the campaign, which will see your quarterback go from college athlete to professional. Hayden Dingman, PCWorld, "This week in games: Razer is making a toaster, Sonic has human baby teeth," 3 May 2019 And college costs have grown so exponentially that between just 2004 and 2017 the average student debt rose from $18,650 to $38,000. Nina Turner, Vogue, "Why Universal Health Care, Higher Wages, and Free Public Education Are Crucial Issues for Black Women," 3 May 2019 The guest in question: the bride's college roommate who brought her own vegan meal to the reception. Nicole Briese, Allure, "A Vegan Wedding Guest Got Shamed for Bringing Her Own Meal, and the Internet Is Torn," 27 Apr. 2019 The couple drifted apart throughout college, and soon divorced. Maggie Maloney, Town & Country, "Why Jill Biden Might Just Be Joe Biden's Greatest Political Asset," 25 Apr. 2019 The Lucite ottoman in a sitting room was a project for Sims’s furniture design studio class during college, and a plaster chandelier by Stephen Antonson hangs in the family room. Jennifer Fernandez, House Beautiful, "The Paint Trick That Instantly Makes Your Home Look More Polished," 22 Mar. 2019 My affinity for dipping sauces and my tendency to fix a plate like a painter’s palette with a dollop of every sauce available earned me the nickname of Condiment Queen in college. Elissa Sanci, Woman's Day, "I Ate Like Queen Elizabeth For a Week, and It Was a Royal Pain," 18 Apr. 2019 This might've struck a chord with William, who dated Kate Middleton for four years after meeting her in college before getting married in 2011. Erica Gonzales, Harper's BAZAAR, "Prince William Reportedly Thought Prince Harry and Meghan Markle's Relationship Was Moving Too Fast," 11 Apr. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'college.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of college

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for college

Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin collegium society, from collega colleague — more at colleague

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Statistics for college

Last Updated

10 May 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for college

The first known use of college was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for college

college

noun

English Language Learners Definition of college

: a school in the U.S. that you go to after high school : a school that offers courses leading to a degree (such as a bachelor's degree or an associate's degree)
: a part of an American university that offers courses in a specified subject
: a school in Britain that offers advanced training in a specified subject

college

noun
col·​lege | \ ˈkä-lij How to pronounce college (audio) \

Kids Definition of college

: a school that offers more advanced classes than a high school

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