cohort

noun
co·​hort | \ ˈkō-ˌhȯrt How to pronounce cohort (audio) \

Definition of cohort

1 : companion, colleague a few of their … cohorts decided to form a company— Burt Hochberg
2a : band, group a cohort of supporters
b : a group of individuals having a statistical factor (such as age or class membership) in common in a demographic study a cohort of premedical students the cohort of people born in the 1980s
c : one of 10 divisions of an ancient Roman legion
d : a group of warriors or soldiers

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Did You Know?

In ancient times, a cohort was a military unit, one of ten divisions in a Roman legion. The term passed into English via French in the 15th century, when it was used in translations and writings about Roman history. Once cohort became established in our language, its meaning was extended, first to refer to any body of troops, then to any group of individuals with something in common, and later to a single companion. Some usage commentators have objected to this last sense because it can be hard to tell whether the plural refers to different individuals or different groups. The companion sense is well established in standard use, however, and its meaning is clear enough in such sentences as her cohorts came along with her to the game.

Examples of cohort in a Sentence

The police arrested the gang's leader and his cohorts. Depression was a common problem for people in that age cohort.

Recent Examples on the Web

Five years ago the mommy and me category barely registered with their cohort. Nicole Phelps, Vogue, "The Maisonette Founders Are Launching a Private Label Collection of Everyday Essentials for Kids," 13 May 2019 Both parties have identified suburban Republican-leaning women as an important cohort in the 2018 midterms. Dylan Scott, Vox, "Six important facts about the voters still undecided in the 2018 midterms.," 22 Oct. 2018 As a cohort, last year’s eighth-graders were further ahead and had taken both tests, Fey said. Alia Malik, San Antonio Express-News, "S.A. school districts made all eighth-graders take algebra — and it worked," 26 June 2018 San Francisco now joins a growing cohort of cities run by black women, including Atlanta, Baltimore, Charlotte, New Orleans, and Washington, D.C., and a host of smaller locales. Kristen Bellstrom, Fortune, "Sarah Huckabee Sanders, London Breed, Nicki Minaj: Broadsheet June 15," 15 June 2018 People inherently pass judgment on things used by a traditionally female cohort, especially when it’s perceived to be something for vanity. Cheryl Wischhover, Vox, "Dyson’s new $500 golden hair dryer, explained," 29 Aug. 2018 And a small but passionate cohort of Catholic youth stand ready not only to defend it, but to share its truths with a world greatly in need of them. Ashley Mcguire, WSJ, "The Controversial Text That Saved Me," 26 July 2018 The attack was one of a series by cohorts in France of Algeria’s Armed Islamic Group, the bloodiest group in an insurgency that racked the North African nation throughout the 1990s and beyond. Elaine Ganley, The Seattle Times, "France expels high-profile terror convict to Algeria," 17 July 2018 The Hemingway Bar may be at the Ritz, but in his day, the writer and a whole cohort of bohèmes spent more of their time at the brasserie in the Lutetia. Chantel Tattoli, Condé Nast Traveler, "Hotel Lutetia: The Newest Grand Dame in Paris Is Now Open," 12 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'cohort.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of cohort

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2c

History and Etymology for cohort

Middle English, from Latin cohort-, cohors — more at court

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Dictionary Entries near cohort

cohomology

Cohonina

cohorn

cohort

cohortation

cohortative

cohosh

Statistics for cohort

Last Updated

17 May 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for cohort

The first known use of cohort was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for cohort

cohort

noun

English Language Learners Definition of cohort

often disapproving : a friend or companion
technical : a group of people used in a study who have something (such as age or social class) in common

cohort

noun
co·​hort | \ ˈkō-ˌhȯ(ə)rt How to pronounce cohort (audio) \

Medical Definition of cohort

: a group of individuals having a statistical factor (as age or risk) in common the population consisted of two cohorts: 204 clearly exposed and 163 not exposed— R. R. Suskind et al

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More from Merriam-Webster on cohort

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with cohort

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for cohort

Spanish Central: Translation of cohort

Nglish: Translation of cohort for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of cohort for Arabic Speakers

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