cohort

noun
co·​hort | \ ˈkō-ˌhȯrt How to pronounce cohort (audio) \

Definition of cohort

1 : companion, colleague a few of their … cohorts decided to form a company— Burt Hochberg
2a : band, group a cohort of supporters
b : a group of individuals having a statistical factor (such as age or class membership) in common in a demographic study a cohort of premedical students the cohort of people born in the 1980s
c : one of 10 divisions of an ancient Roman legion
d : a group of warriors or soldiers

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Did You Know?

In ancient times, a cohort was a military unit, one of ten divisions in a Roman legion. The term passed into English via French in the 15th century, when it was used in translations and writings about Roman history. Once cohort became established in our language, its meaning was extended, first to refer to any body of troops, then to any group of individuals with something in common, and later to a single companion. Some usage commentators have objected to this last sense because it can be hard to tell whether the plural refers to different individuals or different groups. The companion sense is well established in standard use, however, and its meaning is clear enough in such sentences as her cohorts came along with her to the game.

Examples of cohort in a Sentence

The police arrested the gang's leader and his cohorts. Depression was a common problem for people in that age cohort.

Recent Examples on the Web

My mission is to make that the smallest cohort possible, and that’s why my speech on November 16 was so important to me. Brittney Cooper, Marie Claire, "Stacey Abrams Is Just Getting Started," 11 Mar. 2019 Fisher and his cohorts came up with the idea of designating a specific day to focus attention on the initiative. Shari Rudavsky, Indianapolis Star, "You've heard of CPR. Here's another way you could save lives: Stop the Bleed.," 30 Mar. 2018 Minter and his cohorts didn't have much room to run the ball last season, averaging a paltry 97.3 yards per game. Creg Stephenson, AL.com, "Tra Minter, South Alabama running backs ready to produce in 2018," 22 Mar. 2018 After the republicans took over Congress in 1995, Coulter and her cohorts became the darlings of the very media that had ignored or mocked the far right for years. Elinor Burkett, Harper's BAZAAR, "Kellyanne Conway Has Been Quietly Revolutionizing D.C. Since the Late '90s," 3 Feb. 2017 Initially, Zeevi and his cohorts planned to introduce Seedo for sale in February. Debbie Arrington, sacbee, "Growing machine could be next must-have home appliance," 12 Jan. 2017 Research shows that cohorts that have lived through economic downturns have lower appetites for financial risk. Eliza Brooke, Vox, "How the Great Recession influenced a decade of design," 27 Dec. 2018 And from December 17th, Apple Music will join this little cohort. James Vincent, The Verge, "Apple Music is coming to Echo devices next month," 30 Nov. 2018 The shirts were colored by class — blue for seniors, red for juniors, green for sophomores, orange for freshmen — and emblazoned with the wearer’s cohort numbers. Catherine Rentz, baltimoresun.com, "'Agents of change:' A year with the UMBC program shaping some of the nation's best and most diverse scientists," 18 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'cohort.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of cohort

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2c

History and Etymology for cohort

Middle English, from Latin cohort-, cohors — more at court

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Dictionary Entries near cohort

cohomology

Cohonina

cohorn

cohort

cohortation

cohortative

cohosh

Statistics for cohort

Last Updated

22 Mar 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for cohort

The first known use of cohort was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for cohort

cohort

noun

English Language Learners Definition of cohort

often disapproving : a friend or companion
technical : a group of people used in a study who have something (such as age or social class) in common

cohort

noun
co·​hort | \ ˈkō-ˌhȯ(ə)rt How to pronounce cohort (audio) \

Medical Definition of cohort

: a group of individuals having a statistical factor (as age or risk) in common the population consisted of two cohorts: 204 clearly exposed and 163 not exposed— R. R. Suskind et al

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More from Merriam-Webster on cohort

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with cohort

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for cohort

Spanish Central: Translation of cohort

Nglish: Translation of cohort for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of cohort for Arabic Speakers

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