cognitive

adjective
cog·​ni·​tive | \ ˈkäg-nə-tiv \

Definition of cognitive 

1 : of, relating to, being, or involving conscious intellectual activity (such as thinking, reasoning, or remembering) cognitive impairment
2 : based on or capable of being reduced to empirical factual knowledge

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Other Words from cognitive

cognitively adverb

How Should You Use cognitive?

Cognitive skills and knowledge involve the ability to acquire factual information, often the kind of knowledge that can easily be tested. So cognition should be distinguished from social, emotional, and creative development and ability. Cognitive science is a growing field of study that deals with human perception, thinking, and learning.

Examples of cognitive in a Sentence

Homo sapiens' survival is founded in their filling an evolutionary niche referred to as the cognitive niche. — Daniel Grassam, Skeptical Inquirer, July/August 2001 Researchers are debating whether heading balls can dent the cognitive skills of young soccer players for life. — Lisa McLaughlin, Time, 5 June 2000 Further into the forebrain, motor functions trail off and cognitive functions, involving planning and thinking about the future, begin. — Sandra Blakeslee, New York Times, 8 Nov. 1994
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Recent Examples on the Web

In May, Lars Riecke, an assistant professor of audition and cognitive neuroscience at Maastricht University, explained to The Verge that the variance in frequencies can affect what people hear — and what their ears expect to hear. De Elizabeth, Teen Vogue, "Viral "Sesame Street" Clip Has the Internet in Full Debate," 29 Dec. 2018 But later added that sensory, cognitive, affective, and motivational processes influence people’s experience of pain. Nancy Richardson Fischer, Harper's BAZAAR, "The Power of Not Naming My Disorder," 3 Dec. 2018 Since then, a mountain of evidence from twin and adoption studies has convinced most scientists that disorders like schizophrenia and traits like cognitive ability run in families for reasons of nature (genetics) not nurture (environment). Robert Plomin, WSJ, "Our Fortunetelling Genes," 15 Nov. 2018 Even though the children had all the knowledge available to solve their problem, their lack of cognitive abilities left them dangling on how to create the fishhook. David Grossman, Popular Mechanics, "Orangutans Are Better Than Children at Making Tools, Study Finds," 12 Nov. 2018 Now After six months, the groups showed no significant differences in general measures of cognitive ability — things like IQ, memory and attention span — but the piano group had distinguished itself in one key way. Jamie Ducharme, Time, "Why You Should Enroll Your Kids in Piano Lessons, According to Science," 1 July 2018 The lurching advances in building complexity match the explosion in her cognitive abilities as one idea connects with another, as plans form, as capabilities are discovered, as the images in her head have edged toward conscious thought. Aaron Gilbreath, Longreads, "The Inward Empire," 27 June 2018 Educators believed that, in addition to exposing people to art, the books helped enhance cognitive abilities and improve technical skills. Bob Morris, The New Yorker, "The Coloring Book Enters Its Baroque Phase," 11 June 2018 People who live with ALS usually retain their cognitive abilities and their senses. David Herder, SI.com, ""This Is Baseball's Disease": ESPN's Jon Sciambi Rallies Names Around Baseball to ALS Gala," 6 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'cognitive.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of cognitive

1586, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for cognitive

borrowed from Medieval Latin cognitīvus "concerned with knowing," from Latin cognitus, past participle of cognōscere "to get to know, acquire knowledge of" + -īvus -ive — more at cognition

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Statistics for cognitive

Last Updated

11 Jan 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for cognitive

The first known use of cognitive was in 1586

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More Definitions for cognitive

cognitive

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of cognitive

: of, relating to, or involving conscious mental activities (such as thinking, understanding, learning, and remembering)

cognitive

adjective
cog·​ni·​tive | \ ˈkäg-nət-iv \

Medical Definition of cognitive 

: of, relating to, or being conscious intellectual activity (as thinking, reasoning, remembering, imagining, or learning words) the cognitive elements of perception— C. H. Hamburg

Other Words from cognitive

cognitively adverb

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