cloud

noun
\ ˈklau̇d How to pronounce cloud (audio) \

Definition of cloud

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a visible mass of particles of condensed vapor (such as water or ice) suspended in the atmosphere of a planet (such as the earth) or moon
2 : something resembling or suggesting a cloud: such as
a : a light filmy, puffy, or billowy mass seeming to float in the air a cloud of blond hair a ship under a cloud of sail
b(1) : a usually visible mass of minute particles suspended in the air or a gas
(2) : an aggregation of usually obscuring matter especially in interstellar space
(3) : an aggregate of charged particles (such as electrons)
c : a great crowd or multitude : swarm clouds of mosquitoes
3 : something that has a dark, lowering, or threatening aspect clouds of war a cloud of suspicion
4 : something that obscures or blemishes a cloud of ambiguity
5 : a dark or opaque vein or spot (as in marble or a precious stone)
6 : the computers and connections that support cloud computing storing files in the cloud often used before another noun cloud storage/backupcloud software

cloud

verb
clouded; clouding; clouds

Definition of cloud (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to grow cloudy usually used with over or up clouded over before the storm
2a of facial features : to become troubled, apprehensive, or distressed in appearance her face clouded with worry
b : to become blurry, dubious, or ominous often used with over the outlook is clouding over
3 : to billow up in the form of a cloud

transitive verb

1a : to envelop or hide with or as if with a cloud
b : to make opaque especially by condensation of moisture steam clouded the windows
c : to make murky especially with smoke or mist smoke clouded the sky
2 : to make unclear or confused cloud the issue
3 : taint, sully a clouded reputation
4 : to cast gloom over cloud prospects for success

Illustration of cloud

Illustration of cloud

Noun

cloud 1: 1 cirrus, 2 cirrostratus, 3 cirrocumulus, 4 altostratus, 5 altocumulus, 6 stratocumulus, 7 nimbostratus, 8 cumulus, 9 cumulonimbus, 10 stratus

In the meaning defined above

Other Words from cloud

Noun

cloudlike \ ˈklau̇d-​ˌlīk How to pronounce cloud (audio) \ or cloud-like adjective
cloudlike swirls cloudlike chocolate mousse

Examples of cloud in a Sentence

Noun The sun is shining and there's not a cloud in the sky. flying high above the clouds It stopped raining and the sun poked through the clouds. a cloud of cigarette smoke The team has been under a cloud since its members were caught cheating. There's a cloud of controversy hanging over the election. Verb greed clouding the minds of men These new ideas only cloud the issue further. The final years of her life were clouded by illness.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The sheath of impending unrest that hovered over this small coastal town lifted like cloud cover. NBC News, 24 Nov. 2021 The National Weather Service’s forecast calls for highs in the upper 40s on Wednesday with moderate winds and gradually increasing cloud cover throughout the day and evening. Mike Rose, cleveland, 23 Nov. 2021 Along with the fog, Portland will see increasing cloud cover due to a cold front moving in from the Pacific later in the day. oregonlive, 22 Nov. 2021 Friday morning's forecast predicts Cincinnati will see temperatures of 32 degrees during the eclipse with 10-mile visibility and 0% cloud cover, according to Accuweather. Brooks Sutherland, The Enquirer, 18 Nov. 2021 This weather condition can lead to persistent cool temperatures, light rainfall, and cloud cover. Marshall Shepherd, Forbes, 29 Oct. 2021 So did increased cloud cover and even a couple of showers late this afternoon. Washington Post, 26 Oct. 2021 But solar cookers can be used to dehydrate and cure foods to preserve them for stretches of time when there is heavy cloud cover. Nadia Leigh-hewitson, CNN, 21 Oct. 2021 By afternoon, the sun peeked out from behind cloud cover and began drying out the residual moisture. Alex Wigglesworth, Los Angeles Times, 19 Oct. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb These alliances will be impossible to create if lazy generational thinking continues to cloud political judgment. James Chappel, The New Republic, 15 Nov. 2021 Relying on global internet and backhauling traffic to cloud compute locations will not suffice for mobile users and latency-sensitive applications like VoIP and video conferencing. Etay Maor, Forbes, 3 Nov. 2021 Dell can now bundle the digital tools its corporate customers increasingly need, from servers and data-storage units to cloud infrastructure and data-processing software. Emily Bobrow, WSJ, 1 Oct. 2021 Still, leaders in St. George and Cedar City are not letting challenges cloud their sunny outlook. The Salt Lake Tribune, 5 Nov. 2021 This approach models cloud environments through a dependency graph, or topology, that retains context and semantics, helping make links between cause and effect. Bernd Greifeneder, Forbes, 1 Nov. 2021 National Review does not allow partisanship to cloud our judgment on these matters. Michael Brendan Dougherty, National Review, 19 Oct. 2021 But a recent spike in coronavirus cases across parts of China may cloud that recovery, as tough pandemic restrictions hit retail sales toward the end of July. Coco Liu, Bloomberg.com, 23 Aug. 2021 Moving to cloud technology, for example, enables connected experiences for customers and employees, rather than disjointed ones. Ginger Conlon, Forbes, 5 Oct. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'cloud.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of cloud

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1562, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

History and Etymology for cloud

Noun

Middle English, rock, cloud, from Old English clūd; perhaps akin to Greek gloutos buttock

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Time Traveler for cloud

Time Traveler

The first known use of cloud was in the 14th century

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Dictionary Entries Near cloud

clou

cloud

cloudage

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Statistics for cloud

Last Updated

27 Nov 2021

Cite this Entry

“Cloud.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/cloud. Accessed 2 Dec. 2021.

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More Definitions for cloud

cloud

noun

English Language Learners Definition of cloud

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a white or gray mass in the sky that is made of many very small drops of water
: a large amount of smoke, dust, etc., that hangs in the air
: a large group of things (such as insects) that move together through the air

cloud

verb

English Language Learners Definition of cloud (Entry 2 of 2)

: to confuse (a person's mind or judgment)
: to make (something, such as an issue or situation) difficult to understand
: to affect (something) in a bad way

cloud

noun
\ ˈklau̇d How to pronounce cloud (audio) \

Kids Definition of cloud

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a visible mass of tiny bits of water or ice hanging in the air usually high above the earth
2 : a visible mass of small particles in the air a cloud of dust
3 : a large number of things that move together in a group a cloud of mosquitoes
4 : an overwhelming feeling The news cast a cloud of gloom.
5 : the computers and connections that support cloud computing

Other Words from cloud

cloudless \ -​ləs \ adjective

cloud

verb
clouded; clouding

Kids Definition of cloud (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to make or become cloudy The sky clouded up.
2 : to have a bad effect on Involvement in the crime clouded his future.
3 : to make confused Doubts clouded her judgment.

More from Merriam-Webster on cloud

Nglish: Translation of cloud for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of cloud for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about cloud

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