clatter

verb
clat·​ter | \ ˈkla-tər How to pronounce clatter (audio) \
clattered; clattering; clatters

Definition of clatter

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to make a rattling sound the dishes clattered on the shelf
2 : to talk noisily or rapidly
3 : to move or go with a clatter clattered down the stairs

transitive verb

: to cause to clatter

clatter

noun

Definition of clatter (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a rattling sound (as of hard bodies striking together) the clatter of pots and pans
2 : commotion the midday clatter of the business district
3 : noisy chatter

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Other Words from clatter

Verb

clatterer \ ˈkla-​tər-​ər How to pronounce clatter (audio) \ noun
clatteringly \ ˈkla-​tə-​riŋ-​lē How to pronounce clatter (audio) \ adverb

Noun

clattery \ ˈkla-​tə-​rē How to pronounce clatter (audio) \ adjective

Examples of clatter in a Sentence

Verb The shutters clattered against the house. He heard dishes clattering in the kitchen. The box dropped and dozens of marbles clattered across the floor. The wagon clattered down the road. Noun the clatter of a crowded cafeteria
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb In that part of the world, both governments and their opponents know that mass protest is rarely polite; when anger boils over, people clatter over walls, break things, fight cops. Star Tribune, "Unrest helps foes only if U.S. fails to heal," 11 Jan. 2021 In Freetown, the capital of Sierra Leone, thousands of tailors usually work from tiny studios tucked between barber shops and corner stores, or in clattering rows in the fabric section of markets. Ryan Lenora Brown, The Christian Science Monitor, "Face masks unleash creativity: ‘You can be part of the bigger story’," 3 June 2020 Subway trains clattered along their tracks, their doors squealing open to disgorge crowds of passengers. Ryan Lenora Brown, The Christian Science Monitor, "‘If you don’t work you don’t eat’: Where lockdowns have extra sting," 20 Apr. 2020 At a section of uneven sidewalk, the robot paused, as if in thought, before clattering over the break. Washington Post, "24 hours inside the lives upended by coronavirus in the nation’s capital," 2 Apr. 2020 Like his predecessors for nearly 200 years, General Kelley and his wife lived in elegance in a historic Washington residence with high ceilings, crystal chandeliers, a reputed ghost and a view of parade grounds clattering with ceremonial drills. New York Times, "Gen. Paul X. Kelley, Top Marine Tested by a Bombing, Dies at 91," 31 Dec. 2019 Gizmo clattered up to him with his favorite toy, a velvet bone, and Hendrix chuckled. Kevin Fagan, SFChronicle.com, "Evicted for having cancer, disabled house painter lands in a place of his own," 28 Nov. 2019 New turn lanes will stripe the roadway, diverting traffic from a transit spine that’s intended to be a grand promenade, rife with bicycles and clattering streetcars. Rachel Swan, San Francisco Chronicle, "Car-free Market Street," 24 Jan. 2020 These reusable cotton totes are sized like standard paper grocery bags (15 x 12 x 7 inches), with six pop-out bottle sleeves to help keep your bottles from clattering. Popular Science, "The best reusable bags for toting your groceries," 8 Dec. 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Far from the usual whirl and clatter, closeted away from the attentions of the madding crowd, the United States Congress is considering doing something worthwhile for a change. Rich Lowry, National Review, "Repeal the Iraq AUMF," 26 Mar. 2021 There’s no reason students should have to choose between sociability and clatter, not to mention daylight over denim ads, even when their teachers command a space where Ann Taylor and Auntie Anne once reigned supreme. Alexandra Lange, Curbed, "Going to School in a Dead Mall? Not Such a Bad Idea.," 4 Mar. 2021 There are outbursts of men shouting and the clatter of bowling pins falling. Chris Serres, Star Tribune, "COVID-19 vaccines bring joy back to Minnesota's senior homes," 27 Feb. 2021 Her thoughts were interrupted by the hollow clatter of steps quickly and lightly making their way up the ladder behind her. Elliot Ackerman, Wired, "2034, Part I: Peril in the South China Sea," 26 Jan. 2021 When the eight individual butterflies activate the short-length intake trumpets above 5700 rpm, the driver's ears are assaulted with the high-pitch melodic clatter of 40 valves galloping in harmony. Car and Driver, "The Greatest Cars of All Time: The Nineties," 3 July 2020 Maybe the year’s greatest music act was the 7 p.m. pots-and-pans clatter for hospital and essential workers that echoed through New York, and many other places as the pandemic surged around the country. Jake Coyle, chicagotribune.com, "Performing in the pandemic, by Zoom, drive-in and doorstep," 22 Dec. 2020 Lin is not interested in focusing on the song of a singular whale or the clatter of ship traffic, but rather on the habitat’s soundscape — the totality of all its sounds, human, animal and geological — to glean an area’s biodiversity. Star Tribune, "Could listening to the deep sea help save it?," 21 Nov. 2020 Early in what proved to be a painful Merseyside derby for Liverpool, Van Dijk was the subject of a reckless lunge by Jordan Pickford that saw the Everton goalkeeper clatter into the extended right leg of the Netherlands defender. Steve Douglas, Star Tribune, "Van Dijk injury causes concern for frustrated Liverpool," 17 Oct. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'clatter.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of clatter

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for clatter

Verb

Middle English clatren, from Old English *clatrian; of imitative origin

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Time Traveler for clatter

Time Traveler

The first known use of clatter was in the 13th century

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Statistics for clatter

Cite this Entry

“Clatter.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/clatter. Accessed 13 May. 2021.

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More Definitions for clatter

clatter

verb

English Language Learners Definition of clatter

: to make a quick series of short loud sounds

clatter

verb
clat·​ter | \ ˈkla-tər How to pronounce clatter (audio) \
clattered; clattering

Kids Definition of clatter

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to make or cause to make a rattling sound Dishes clattered in the kitchen.
2 : to move or go with a rattling sound The cart clattered down the road.

clatter

noun

Kids Definition of clatter (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a rattling sound (as of hard objects striking together) the clatter of pots and pans
2 : commotion She … burst into the schoolroom with such a noise and a clatter that Tommy and Annika … jumped in their seats.— Astrid Lindgren, Pippi Longstocking

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