chronicle

noun
chron·​i·​cle | \ ˈkrä-ni-kəl How to pronounce chronicle (audio) \

Definition of chronicle

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a historical account of events arranged in order of time usually without analysis or interpretation a chronicle of the Civil War
2 : narrative sense 1 a chronicle of the struggle against drug traffickers

chronicle

verb
chronicled; chronicling\ ˈkrä-​ni-​k(ə-​)liŋ How to pronounce chronicling (audio) \

Definition of chronicle (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to present a record of in or as if in a chronicle chronicle Victorian society chronicle the doings of the rich and famous

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Other Words from chronicle

Verb

chronicler \ ˈkrä-​ni-​k(ə-​)lər How to pronounce chronicler (audio) \ noun

Examples of chronicle in a Sentence

Noun a chronicle of the American Civil War a chronicle of the President's years in office Verb The book chronicles the events that led to the American Civil War. She intends to chronicle the broad social changes that have occurred in this part of the country. a magazine that chronicles the lives of the rich and famous
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun These natural chronicles can shed light on aspects of climate extending back hundreds or even thousands of years, says Raphael Neukom, a climate scientist at the University of Bern. Sid Perkins, Science | AAAS, "Ancient global climate events rippled unevenly across the globe," 24 July 2019 This chronicle of a rare and marvelous traveling circus, which came and went in a flash just as America was celebrating its 200th birthday, is 100 percent believable, which is not the same as 100 percent true. Stephanie Zacharek, Time, "Martin Scorsese’s Bob Dylan Film Rolling Thunder Revue Is One of the Most Truthful Movies You’ll See in 2019," 12 June 2019 Turnour also studied a later chronicle of Sri Lankan history, the Culavamsa, which told the story of King Kashyapa. National Geographic, "The 'Lion Fortress' of Sri Lanka was swallowed by the jungle," 3 Sep. 2019 The majority of the book is a chronicle of the annual parade, told in newspaper clippings and personal accounts. al, "Mardi Gras history re-evaluates the marque of Cain," 22 Aug. 2019 But a heady combination of Shakespearean drama, slap-you-in-the-face-smart dialogue, and a roster of thoroughly depraved antiheroes quietly positioned it as the next must-watch chronicle of power-playing intrigue. Julie Kosin, Harper's BAZAAR, "Who Won the Succession Game of Thrones This Week?," 12 Aug. 2019 Most of it reads like a chronicle of a mundane work trip. Ginger Thompson, ProPublica, "A Border Patrol Agent Reveals What It’s Really Like to Guard Migrant Children," 16 July 2019 The results of that labor of love is a staggering chronicle that lives and breathes on Gildea’s Facebook page, sorted alphabetically in photo albums of each school. Kyle Neddenriep, Indianapolis Star, "Jeff Gildea will continue to visit Indiana's fading gyms as long as cancer lets him," 11 June 2019 Bold writers can draw on the daily chronicles of hypocrisy and clampdowns recorded by a lively press. L.t. | Kampala, The Economist, "The writers breathing fresh life into Ugandan literature," 23 Aug. 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Mellows, who has chronicled his travels on Twitter under the handle @Baseball_Brit, quit his job as a teacher in South Korea, spent a few days back home in England and flew to Tokyo for the season-opening series between the Mariners and A’s. Dan Gartland, SI.com, "Baseball Brit’s Cross-Country Trek Is No Walk in the Park," 11 Sep. 2019 The exhibition chronicles the years of incarceration and sheds a rare light on what life was like at Poston War Relocation Center, as it was officially called. Daily Pilot, "New exhibit in Anaheim tells stories of O.C.-based Japanese Americans incarcerated during World War II," 5 Sep. 2019 The final lecture in the series will feature Laurie Masciandaro of Roseland Cottage on Sunday, Aug. 25, who will chronicle the history of Connecticut’s Historic Gardens. courant.com, "Community News For The Windsor Locks Edition," 14 Aug. 2019 Diving for Starfish by Cherie Burns chronicles the pieces many lives and many owners—including Millicent Rogers and Sao Schlumberger. Stellene Volandes, Town & Country, "The Boivin Starfish, Originally Owned by Claudette Colbert, Finds a New Home in a Museum," 20 June 2019 Barbara Stanwyck assumes the role of a columnist who chronicles a fictitious life as a housewife at a bucolic Connecticut farm. Lilah Ramzi, Vogue, "13 Classic Christmas Movies That Millennials Should Definitely Watch," 6 Dec. 2018 The historic state capital of Annapolis is draped in grief from the attack at the local newspaper that killed the journalists who chronicled soccer games, art exhibits and the fabric of small-city life. Fox News, "The Latest: Priest highlights work of 5 slain journalists," 30 June 2018 Sports Illustrated's Greg Bishop chronicled the Hilinski family’s search for answers in the aftermath of the tragedy. Jenna West, SI.com, "South Carolina Honors Tyler Hilinski, Brother of Gamecocks QB," 14 Sep. 2019 Her first story chronicled the plight of a young MS-13 member who informed Suffolk County police about the gang to escape its clutches, but was deported back to El Salvador anyway. Brian Pascus, CBS News, "Hannah Dreier wins Morley Safer Award for Outstanding Reporting for series on MS-13 gang violence," 12 Sep. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'chronicle.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of chronicle

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for chronicle

Noun

Middle English cronycle, borrowed from Anglo-French cronike, cronicle (-le perhaps by assimilation to words with the suffix -icle, as article article entry 1), borrowed from Latin chronica "book of annals," borrowed from Greek () chroniká, (hai) chronikaí, from plural of chronikós "of time, temporal, in order by time" (with a noun such as biblía "books" or graphaí "writings" understood) — more at chronic

Verb

Middle English cronyclen, verbal derivative of cronycle chronicle entry 1

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Statistics for chronicle

Last Updated

23 Oct 2019

Time Traveler for chronicle

The first known use of chronicle was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for chronicle

chronicle

noun
How to pronounce chronicle (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of chronicle

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a description of events in the order that they happened

chronicle

verb

English Language Learners Definition of chronicle (Entry 2 of 2)

: to describe a series of events in the order that they happened

chronicle

noun
chron·​i·​cle | \ ˈkrä-ni-kəl How to pronounce chronicle (audio) \

Kids Definition of chronicle

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: an account of events in the order that they happened : history

chronicle

verb
chronicled; chronicling

Kids Definition of chronicle (Entry 2 of 2)

: to record in the order of occurrence This chapter chronicles the events leading to the American Revolution.

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