chronicle

noun
chron·​i·​cle | \ ˈkrä-ni-kəl How to pronounce chronicle (audio) \

Definition of chronicle

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a historical account of events arranged in order of time usually without analysis or interpretation a chronicle of the Civil War
2 : narrative sense 1 a chronicle of the struggle against drug traffickers

chronicle

verb
chronicled; chronicling\ ˈkrä-​ni-​k(ə-​)liŋ How to pronounce chronicling (audio) \

Definition of chronicle (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to present a record of in or as if in a chronicle chronicle Victorian society chronicle the doings of the rich and famous

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Other Words from chronicle

Verb

chronicler \ ˈkrä-​ni-​k(ə-​)lər How to pronounce chronicler (audio) \ noun

Examples of chronicle in a Sentence

Noun a chronicle of the American Civil War a chronicle of the President's years in office Verb The book chronicles the events that led to the American Civil War. She intends to chronicle the broad social changes that have occurred in this part of the country. a magazine that chronicles the lives of the rich and famous
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Now 77, Johnson has released Betsey: A Memoir, a chronicle of her life so far, and a fashion legacy that’s, yes, cartwheeled her right into our hearts. Betsey Johnson, refinery29.com, "Betsey Johnson: Advice to My 26-Year-Old Self," 17 Apr. 2020 Surely that eternal task has never had so comprehensive a chronicle as this one. Steve Donoghue, The Christian Science Monitor, "‘Author in Chief’ finds the gold amid the dross of presidential memoirs," 7 Apr. 2020 Over the decades, the webcam has drawn a sizable following as an everyday chronicle of the seemingly mundane. Mihir Zaveri, BostonGlobe.com, "San Francisco FogCam Won’t Be Shut Down After All," 2 Sep. 2019 The roughly 150 prints and 14 minutes of video, arranged in two of the museum’s three galleries, chronicle some of the unique perspectives on Earth and space afforded by aerial photography. Richard B. Woodward, WSJ, "‘The Elevated Eye: Aerial Photography Past and Present’ Review: The View From Above," 27 Jan. 2020 According to the Xin Tangshu, the official chronicle of the Tang Dynasty, the high-ranking subject of Emperor Xizong had his own passion for polo, viewing the sport as a road to military prestige and a chance to keep his equestrian skills sharp. National Geographic, "THE BEST OF NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC DELIVERED TO YOUR INBOX," 24 Mar. 2020 Collectively, these chronicles attest to the idea of pandemic resilience – the possibility that disease outbreaks can be lived through with empathy, ingenuity and sheer human ordinariness. Belinda Kong, The Conversation, "How Chinese people came together when separated by quarantine, creating hope, humor and art," 18 Mar. 2020 Buy Now: $12, barnesandnoble.com Black Lamb and Grey Falcon, Rebecca West (1942) The writer's chronicle of Yugoslavia on the eve of World War II enjoyed a boost in popularity when the country dissolved a half-century later. Cnt Editors, Condé Nast Traveler, "The 87 Greatest Travel Books of All Time, According to Authors," 8 Jan. 2020 Her chronicles of her day to day were shot through with comments about her fears of going to school and living with the constant threat of violence. Samhita Mukhopadhyay, Teen Vogue, "Malala Yousafzai on Education, Islamophobia, and the New Wave of Youth Activism," 16 Dec. 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb His father, James, was murdered in 1993, and Jordan's close relationship with him was well-chronicled. Scott Gleeson, USA TODAY, "'Don't ever talk trash to Black Jesus' among most unforgettable quotes from Michael Jordan in 'Last Dance'," 18 May 2020 Many of them have expressed concerns for their own health or for their loved ones', stories that have been chronicled bh The Oregonian/OregonLive. oregonlive, "Fewer TriMet workers on medical leave related to COVID-19," 15 May 2020 It was filmed over six years and chronicles how depression, bipolar disorder, drugs and alcohol almost destroyed Blue October and Furstenfeld himself. Joey Guerra, ExpressNews.com, "Houston band Blue October tackles mental illness, addiction in new documentary 'Get Back Up'," 14 May 2020 Pillars of Greek literature, the books chronicle such renowned events as the Fall of Troy and Odysseus' long voyage home. Brandon Griggs, CNN, "15 epic books you may finally have time to read now," 10 May 2020 For some of us, it's meant chronicling the everyday heroes heading to work on the front lines. Lindsay Schallon, Glamour, "The Best Beauty Products We Tried This April," 30 Apr. 2020 In 2005, filmmaker Andrew Fried began chronicling their adventures beatboxing and rapping on sidewalks. EW.com, "Freestyle Love Supreme documentary coming to Hulu in June," 30 Apr. 2020 The resulting documentary is a delightful and affecting oral history, chronicling a specifically New York chapter in the story of gay life in the United States. Sheri Linden, The Hollywood Reporter, "'P.S. Burn This Letter Please': Film Review | Tribeca 2020," 23 Apr. 2020 Documents chronicling the event were found in Turkish state archives, the team reports online today in Meteoritics & Planetary Science. Sid Perkins, Science | AAAS, "Archivists uncover earliest evidence of a person being killed by a meteorite," 22 Apr. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'chronicle.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of chronicle

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for chronicle

Noun

Middle English cronycle, borrowed from Anglo-French cronike, cronicle (-le perhaps by assimilation to words with the suffix -icle, as article article entry 1), borrowed from Latin chronica "book of annals," borrowed from Greek () chroniká, (hai) chronikaí, from plural of chronikós "of time, temporal, in order by time" (with a noun such as biblía "books" or graphaí "writings" understood) — more at chronic

Verb

Middle English cronyclen, verbal derivative of cronycle chronicle entry 1

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Time Traveler for chronicle

Time Traveler

The first known use of chronicle was in the 14th century

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Statistics for chronicle

Last Updated

21 May 2020

Cite this Entry

“Chronicle.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/chronicle. Accessed 2 Jun. 2020.

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More Definitions for chronicle

chronicle

noun
How to pronounce chronicle (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of chronicle

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a description of events in the order that they happened

chronicle

verb

English Language Learners Definition of chronicle (Entry 2 of 2)

: to describe a series of events in the order that they happened

chronicle

noun
chron·​i·​cle | \ ˈkrä-ni-kəl How to pronounce chronicle (audio) \

Kids Definition of chronicle

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: an account of events in the order that they happened : history

chronicle

verb
chronicled; chronicling

Kids Definition of chronicle (Entry 2 of 2)

: to record in the order of occurrence This chapter chronicles the events leading to the American Revolution.

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Comments on chronicle

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