chronicle

noun
chron·​i·​cle | \ ˈkrä-ni-kəl How to pronounce chronicle (audio) \

Definition of chronicle

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a historical account of events arranged in order of time usually without analysis or interpretation a chronicle of the Civil War
2 : narrative sense 1 a chronicle of the struggle against drug traffickers

chronicle

verb
chronicled; chronicling\ ˈkrä-​ni-​k(ə-​)liŋ How to pronounce chronicling (audio) \

Definition of chronicle (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to present a record of in or as if in a chronicle chronicle Victorian society chronicle the doings of the rich and famous

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Other Words from chronicle

Verb

chronicler \ ˈkrä-​ni-​k(ə-​)lər How to pronounce chronicler (audio) \ noun

Examples of chronicle in a Sentence

Noun a chronicle of the American Civil War a chronicle of the President's years in office Verb The book chronicles the events that led to the American Civil War. She intends to chronicle the broad social changes that have occurred in this part of the country. a magazine that chronicles the lives of the rich and famous
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun All chronicle life in the wilderness, but their message is more about families, dreams and living purposefully. Author: Roger Kaye, Anchorage Daily News, "In new documentary, ‘rewilding’ a home painstakingly crafted in the Alaska Bush," 22 June 2020 No one has undertaken a chronicle from Alaric’s point of view, a lacuna that makes this book worthwhile—and hard to pull off. The Economist, "Goths v Romans A brilliant Goth’s-eye view of the sack of Rome," 20 June 2020 From a granular Business Insider chronicle of recent events at Brex. David Z. Morris, Fortune, "The ‘one transaction’ that could solve the racial wealth gap," 17 June 2020 Hell and Other Destinations by Madeleine Albright (Harper: $30) A chronicle of the former secretary of State’s life after leaving office. Ed Stockly, Los Angeles Times, "Southern California Bestsellers: Fiction and nonfiction hardcovers," 7 May 2020 Shaw saves each day’s New York Times as a chronicle, but says there are internal efforts to form a timeline based on updates from CDC’s Emergency Operations Center. Ashlea Halpern, Condé Nast Traveler, "How the CDC Museum in Atlanta Is Documenting COVID-19 for Future Generations," 29 Apr. 2020 Wang’s idiosyncratic chronicle of a massively deceptive, horrifically cruel program hits very close to home for her. Michael Phillips, chicagotribune.com, "‘One Child Nation’ review: China’s population control policy provokes a gripping personal documentary," 15 Aug. 2019 Now 77, Johnson has released Betsey: A Memoir, a chronicle of her life so far, and a fashion legacy that’s, yes, cartwheeled her right into our hearts. Betsey Johnson, refinery29.com, "Betsey Johnson: Advice to My 26-Year-Old Self," 17 Apr. 2020 Surely that eternal task has never had so comprehensive a chronicle as this one. Steve Donoghue, The Christian Science Monitor, "‘Author in Chief’ finds the gold amid the dross of presidential memoirs," 7 Apr. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Riggins says her song journal has always been filled with lyrics that chronicle the struggle seen through the eyes of a Black, gay woman in America. Ben Crandell, sun-sentinel.com, "Fort Lauderdale singer Kat Riggins’ new social-justice blues: When the universe yelled, she cried out," 6 Aug. 2020 Ashley Gilmore made sure to chronicle her children’s first day of school at Clarksville Elementary School on Thursday. David J. Kim, The Courier-Journal, "'Right now, this is the best way': Clarksville schools return to in-person classes, sort of," 6 Aug. 2020 Focusing on personal growth and self-discovery, this journal helps to chronicle your life’s story. Jillian Tracy, CNN Underscored, "Everything you need to know if you want to start journaling," 3 Aug. 2020 The Enquirer will chronicle how the mask mandate is being followed in the region. Scott Wartman, The Enquirer, "Masks are now mandatory in Cincinnati, Hamilton and Butler counties. Are people wearing them?," 9 July 2020 The actor, who played the chili-making accountant Kevin Malone, is hosting and producing a new podcast called An Oral History of The Office, which will chronicle how the beloved show became such a hit. Robyn Merrett, PEOPLE.com, "Spotify Announces Oral History of The Office Podcast Hosted by Brian Baumgartner (a.k.a. Kevin!)," 6 July 2020 The Grammy-winning musical artist will star in a new Netflix series later this year titled Voices of Fire, which will chronicle his return to his hometown community to build one of the world's most inspiring gospel choirs. Omar Sanchez, EW.com, "Pharrell will return home to build a gospel choir in Netflix's Voices of Fire," 5 July 2020 Welcome to Refinery29’s Fertility Diaries, where people chronicle their joyous, painful, and sometimes complicated paths to parenthood. refinery29.com, "Fertility Diary: I’ve Spent $4,000 Trying To Get Pregnant During COVID-19," 30 June 2020 On the floor lay more signs, awaiting installation, along with several large black-and-white prints by photographer Adrian White that artfully chronicle the protests that have taken place around L.A. Los Angeles Times, "How a South L.A. gallery is turning Black Lives Matter protest signs into art," 2 July 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'chronicle.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of chronicle

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for chronicle

Noun

Middle English cronycle, borrowed from Anglo-French cronike, cronicle (-le perhaps by assimilation to words with the suffix -icle, as article article entry 1), borrowed from Latin chronica "book of annals," borrowed from Greek () chroniká, (hai) chronikaí, from plural of chronikós "of time, temporal, in order by time" (with a noun such as biblía "books" or graphaí "writings" understood) — more at chronic

Verb

Middle English cronyclen, verbal derivative of cronycle chronicle entry 1

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Time Traveler for chronicle

Time Traveler

The first known use of chronicle was in the 14th century

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Statistics for chronicle

Last Updated

4 Jul 2020

Cite this Entry

“Chronicle.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/chronicle. Accessed 11 Aug. 2020.

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More Definitions for chronicle

chronicle

noun
How to pronounce chronicle (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of chronicle

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a description of events in the order that they happened

chronicle

verb

English Language Learners Definition of chronicle (Entry 2 of 2)

: to describe a series of events in the order that they happened

chronicle

noun
chron·​i·​cle | \ ˈkrä-ni-kəl How to pronounce chronicle (audio) \

Kids Definition of chronicle

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: an account of events in the order that they happened : history

chronicle

verb
chronicled; chronicling

Kids Definition of chronicle (Entry 2 of 2)

: to record in the order of occurrence This chapter chronicles the events leading to the American Revolution.

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Comments on chronicle

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