cheer

noun
\ ˈchir How to pronounce cheer (audio) \

Definition of cheer

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a obsolete : face
b archaic : facial expression
2 : state of mind or heart : spirit be of good cheer — Matthew 9:2 (King James Version)
3 : lightness of mind and feeling : animation, gaiety faces full of cheer
4 : hospitable entertainment : welcome
5 : food and drink for a feast : fare every table was loaded with good cheer— T. B. Macaulay
6 : something that gladdens words of cheer
7a : a shout of applause or encouragement the players were greeted with loud cheers
b US : the activity of organized cheerleading With autumn approaching, evenings at Stringham Pitcher Park are again alive with the sounds of football and cheer.— Laura McCusker

cheer

verb
cheered; cheering; cheers

Definition of cheer (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to instill with hope or courage : comfort usually used with up cheer desponding men with new-born hope— William Wordsworth
b : to make glad or happy usually used with up clowns who cheer up children in hospitals
2 : to urge on or encourage especially by shouts cheered the team on
3 : to applaud with shouts The contest winner was cheered as she accepted the trophy.

intransitive verb

1 obsolete : to be mentally or emotionally disposed
2 : to grow or be cheerful : rejoice usually used with up Cheer up! Things could be worse.
3 : to utter a shout of applause or triumph What is there to cheer about?
4 US : to perform as a cheerleader A gymnast from the age of 3, she switched to cheerleading in middle school. Rink cheered for three years for her middle school and became a cheerleader for Penn.— Nikki Taylor

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Other Words from cheer

Verb

cheerer noun

Examples of cheer in a Sentence

Noun

The audience let out a cheer. Loud cheers were coming from the bleachers. The star was greeted with cheers. Let's spread a little holiday cheer. The cheerleaders did a cheer for the home team.

Verb

The crowd cheered as he crossed the finish line. We were cheering for you all the way! The crowd cheered him as he crossed the finish line. Their fans cheered them to victory. Supporters cheered the court's decision. Investors were cheered by good economic news.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

The crowd erupted into cheers at the sight of O.G. plus-size model Emme and clapped each time a familiar face stepped onto the scene. Janelle Okwodu, Vogue, "11 Honoré Shakes Up Fashion Week With Laverne Cox and a Size-Inclusive Cast of Model Stars," 7 Feb. 2019 Straightaway, the engineers and those in the auditorium erupted into cheers and applause. Loren Grush, The Verge, "Hanging out at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory," 27 Nov. 2018 Inside the control room at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, with space agency administrator Jim Bridenstine looking on, red-shirted engineers broke into cheers as InSight touched down. Eric Berger, Ars Technica, "NASA does it again by landing safely on Mars—something no one else has done," 26 Nov. 2018 The crowd erupted into cheers as Svendsen looked shocked and made her way to the stage so Weiss could get down on one knee. Eileen Reslen, Good Housekeeping, "Director Glenn Weiss Just Proposed to Girlfriend Jan Svendsen at the 2018 Emmy Awards," 18 Sep. 2018 Privacy - Terms The packed crowd broke out into cheers early on as England opened scoring in the fifth minute with a goal from Kieran Trippier off a free kick. Jordan Mcpherson, miamiherald, "Beckham enjoys World Cup at Miami watch party until the end. Now, onto stadium pitch," 11 July 2018 Germany's fans erupted into loud cheers when Kroos saved his team from a draw. Jenna West, SI.com, "Watch: What Toni Kroos's Incredible Last-Second Winner Looked Like From the Stands," 23 June 2018 The studio audience gasped — before breaking into cheers. John Koblin, New York Times, "Samantha Bee Apologizes for a Slur Against Ivanka Trump," 31 May 2018 The new Duke and Duchess of Sussex shared their first kiss as husband and wife on the steps of St. George’s Chapel as the crowds in front of them erupted into cheers. Erin Hill, PEOPLE.com, "Back to the Palace! Newlyweds Harry and Meghan Arrive Home After Their Royal Wedding Weekend," 21 May 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

When the lights turned on, all sprang to their feet and cheered. Ian Malone, Vogue, "Camelot Ruled the Stage at Lincoln Center Theater’s Benefit Gala," 5 Mar. 2019 Hours after Booker left New Hampshire, voters there cheered California Sen. Kamala Harris’ vows to take on the president. Elana Schor, The Seattle Times, "Ready to fight: Cory Booker shows his tough side to voters," 20 Feb. 2019 Friends are dancing around and cheering in the background as a piano player accompanies them. Katherine J. Igoe, Marie Claire, "Ariana Grande Just Casually Belts Out Show Tunes with Her Friends at Parties," 18 Feb. 2019 And the entire Beckham clan could be seen cheering the designer on from the front row. Amy Mackelden, Harper's BAZAAR, "Victoria Beckham's Entire Family Sat Front Row at Her London Fashion Week Show," 17 Feb. 2019 At the beginning of his Saint Laurent tenure, Slimane was mostly excoriated by fashion critics, but retailers cheered his rigorously unsentimental creative destruction because from it came the kind of clothes most people actually wear these days. Alexandra Marshall, WSJ, "Exclusive: Step Inside YSL’s New Parisian Headquarters," 15 Feb. 2019 Bungie split off from Activision this week, taking control of the Destiny franchise with them, and staff reportedly cheered when the announcement was made. Hayden Dingman, PCWorld, "This week in games: Bungie divorces Activision, Epic gives our favorite game of 2017 away for free," 11 Jan. 2019 After the press reported that the clip had been viewed nearly a million times by commenters who cheered the action, the uploader temporarily got his entire channel terminated from YouTube. Patricia Hernandez, The Verge, "YouTube reverses ban for streamer who killed Red Dead 2 feminist," 8 Nov. 2018 The decision was cheered by the nuclear industry’s primary trade group, which said the commission’s initial actions after the disaster and $4 billion in spending on safety upgrades since then had prepared nuclear reactors for the worst. Timothy Puko, WSJ, "Nuclear Power Regulators Scale Back Draft Safety Rule," 24 Jan. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'cheer.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of cheer

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

History and Etymology for cheer

Noun and Verb

Middle English chere face, cheer, from Anglo-French, face, from Medieval Latin cara, probably from Greek kara head, face — more at cerebral

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Learn More about cheer

Dictionary Entries near cheer

cheep

cheeper

cheepy

cheer

cheerful

cheerfulize

cheeringly

Statistics for cheer

Last Updated

14 Mar 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for cheer

The first known use of cheer was in the 13th century

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More Definitions for cheer

cheer

noun

English Language Learners Definition of cheer

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a shout of praise or encouragement
somewhat formal : a happy feeling or attitude
: a special song or chant that is performed to encourage a team during a game in sports like American football and basketball

cheer

verb

English Language Learners Definition of cheer (Entry 2 of 2)

: to shout with joy, approval, or enthusiasm
: to express enthusiastic approval of or support for (something)
: to cause (someone) to feel happier or more hopeful

cheer

noun
\ ˈchir How to pronounce cheer (audio) \

Kids Definition of cheer

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a happy feeling : good spirits full of cheer
2 : something that gladdens words of cheer
3 : a shout of praise or encouragement The crowd let out a cheer.

cheer

verb
cheered; cheering

Kids Definition of cheer (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to give hope to or make happier : comfort Signs of spring cheered her.
2 : to grow or be cheerful usually used with up “… I don't WANT to cheer up. It's nicer to be miserable!”— Lucy Maud Montgomery, Anne of Green Gables
3 : to urge on especially with shouts or cheers They cheered the team to victory.
4 : to shout with joy, approval, or enthusiasm We cheered when he crossed the finish line.

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More from Merriam-Webster on cheer

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with cheer

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for cheer

Spanish Central: Translation of cheer

Nglish: Translation of cheer for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of cheer for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about cheer

Comments on cheer

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