cheer

noun
\ ˈchir \

Definition of cheer

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a obsolete : face
b archaic : facial expression
2 : state of mind or heart : spirit be of good cheer — Matthew 9:2 (King James Version)
3 : lightness of mind and feeling : animation, gaiety faces full of cheer
4 : hospitable entertainment : welcome
5 : food and drink for a feast : fare every table was loaded with good cheer— T. B. Macaulay
6 : something that gladdens words of cheer
7a : a shout of applause or encouragement the players were greeted with loud cheers
b US : the activity of organized cheerleading With autumn approaching, evenings at Stringham Pitcher Park are again alive with the sounds of football and cheer.— Laura McCusker

cheer

verb
cheered; cheering; cheers

Definition of cheer (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to instill with hope or courage : comfort usually used with up cheer desponding men with new-born hope— William Wordsworth
b : to make glad or happy usually used with up clowns who cheer up children in hospitals
2 : to urge on or encourage especially by shouts cheered the team on
3 : to applaud with shouts The contest winner was cheered as she accepted the trophy.

intransitive verb

1 obsolete : to be mentally or emotionally disposed
2 : to grow or be cheerful : rejoice usually used with up Cheer up! Things could be worse.
3 : to utter a shout of applause or triumph What is there to cheer about?
4 US : to perform as a cheerleader A gymnast from the age of 3, she switched to cheerleading in middle school. Rink cheered for three years for her middle school and became a cheerleader for Penn.— Nikki Taylor

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Other Words from cheer

Verb

cheerer noun

Examples of cheer in a Sentence

Noun

The audience let out a cheer. Loud cheers were coming from the bleachers. The star was greeted with cheers. Let's spread a little holiday cheer. The cheerleaders did a cheer for the home team.

Verb

The crowd cheered as he crossed the finish line. We were cheering for you all the way! The crowd cheered him as he crossed the finish line. Their fans cheered them to victory. Supporters cheered the court's decision. Investors were cheered by good economic news.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Running around, building up outposts, and raking in positive reinforcement and joyous cheers from the folks around you is a good time despite the downsides. Daniel Starkey, Ars Technica, "Starlink: Battle for Atlas review: Cool toys, solid spacefaring," 16 Oct. 2018 It's certainly improved my quality of life (cheers to enjoying showers again!) and hopefully can help a few of you out, too. Kaleigh Fasanella, Allure, "My Skin Got Hives Every Time I Showered — Until I Discovered a Water Softener," 25 Sep. 2018 Even Justin Timberlake tried the cheer out during his Monday concert at London’s O2 Arena. Megan Mccluskey, Time, "World Cup Fans Continue to Do the Most With England's 'It's Coming Home' Chant," 10 July 2018 After the rousing performance, others including Tina Fey, Iman, and the stars of the show celebrated late into the evening to many cheers. Edward Barsamian, Vogue, "Oprah, Uma, and Everyone You Know Flocked to To Kill a Mockingbird’s Broadway Opening," 14 Dec. 2018 The result of the vote was announced to loud cheers from lawmakers gathered in a stuffy, ornately wallpapered room in the House of Commons. Jill Lawless, The Seattle Times, "UK’s May wins no-confidence vote by MPs unhappy over Brexit," 12 Dec. 2018 In a super sweet video, Barack can be seen holding hands with his wife, spinning her around, comparing her to Beyoncé, and generally looking adoringly at her, as the crowd cheers. Amy Mackelden, Harper's BAZAAR, "Barack Obama Surprised Michelle Obama on Her Book Tour & Compared Her to Beyoncé," 18 Nov. 2018 In Russia, vodka is the cheers of choice, so vodka’s going to be drank out of it. Michelle R. Martinelli, For The Win, "The craziest things put in the Stanley Cup and 12 other questions answered by its keeper," 28 May 2018 Even with all the holiday cheer and decorations—or maybe because of them—a lot of people suffer from depression this time of the year. Emily Chiu, Redbook, "6 Simple Things That Help Me Deal With Holiday Depression," 29 Nov. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

The decision was cheered by the nuclear industry’s primary trade group, which said the commission’s initial actions after the disaster and $4 billion in spending on safety upgrades since then had prepared nuclear reactors for the worst. Timothy Puko, WSJ, "Nuclear Power Regulators Scale Back Draft Safety Rule," 24 Jan. 2019 But her most important shoutout went to her parents, who were enthusiastically (and OMG so adorably) cheering her on from the audience. Megan Stein, Country Living, "Here's What Sandra Oh Said to Her Parents During Her Emotional Golden Globes Speech," 7 Jan. 2019 Amal was there to receive the 2018 UNCA Global Citizen of the Year Award for her humanitarian work, and George there to cheer her on. Katherine J. Igoe, Marie Claire, "Amal Clooney Accepts UN Global Citizens Award," 6 Dec. 2018 There's no need to commit girl-on-girl crime when cheering up your bud. Meredith Clark, SELF, "Real Women Share the Best and Worst Responses to a Friend Going Through a Breakup," 22 Dec. 2018 There are no viral Pelosi clips, no iconic Pelosi speeches, and no vast cheering crowds at Pelosi rallies. Matthew Yglesias, Vox, "House Democrats don’t need a leader, they need someone to represent them on TV," 20 Nov. 2018 But hey, the idea of Emilia finding a potential moon of her life, her sun and her stars has surely got to slightly cheer up your morning. Lucy Wood, Marie Claire, "Who is Emilia Clarke's Rumored New Boyfriend, Charlie McDowell?," 25 Oct. 2018 Diana would often call her friend, who would visit her at Buckingham Palace to cheer her up, and Sarah recommended her astrologer to Diana. Marcia Moody, Town & Country, "Inside Princess Diana's Complicated Friendship with Sarah Ferguson, Duchess of York," 22 July 2018 Davis and Miller left a Florence hospital for a rehabilitation center last week holding hands as hundreds of people cheered. Jeffrey Collins, The Seattle Times, "2nd police officer dies after South Carolina ambush attack," 23 Oct. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'cheer.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of cheer

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

History and Etymology for cheer

Noun and Verb

Middle English chere face, cheer, from Anglo-French, face, from Medieval Latin cara, probably from Greek kara head, face — more at cerebral

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Learn More about cheer

Dictionary Entries near cheer

cheep

cheeper

cheepy

cheer

cheerful

cheerfulize

cheeringly

Statistics for cheer

Last Updated

14 Feb 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for cheer

The first known use of cheer was in the 13th century

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More Definitions for cheer

cheer

noun

English Language Learners Definition of cheer

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a shout of praise or encouragement
somewhat formal : a happy feeling or attitude
: a special song or chant that is performed to encourage a team during a game in sports like American football and basketball

cheer

verb

English Language Learners Definition of cheer (Entry 2 of 2)

: to shout with joy, approval, or enthusiasm
: to express enthusiastic approval of or support for (something)
: to cause (someone) to feel happier or more hopeful

cheer

noun
\ ˈchir \

Kids Definition of cheer

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a happy feeling : good spirits full of cheer
2 : something that gladdens words of cheer
3 : a shout of praise or encouragement The crowd let out a cheer.

cheer

verb
cheered; cheering

Kids Definition of cheer (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to give hope to or make happier : comfort Signs of spring cheered her.
2 : to grow or be cheerful usually used with up “… I don't WANT to cheer up. It's nicer to be miserable!”— Lucy Maud Montgomery, Anne of Green Gables
3 : to urge on especially with shouts or cheers They cheered the team to victory.
4 : to shout with joy, approval, or enthusiasm We cheered when he crossed the finish line.

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More from Merriam-Webster on cheer

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with cheer

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for cheer

Spanish Central: Translation of cheer

Nglish: Translation of cheer for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of cheer for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about cheer

Comments on cheer

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excited commotion or publicity

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