chaperone

1 of 2

noun

chap·​er·​one ˈsha-pə-ˌrōn How to pronounce chaperone (audio)
variants or less commonly chaperon
1
: a person (such as a matron) who for propriety (see propriety sense 2) accompanies one or more young unmarried women in public or in mixed company
2
: an older person who accompanies young people at a social gathering to ensure proper behavior
broadly : one delegated to ensure proper behavior
I was a chaperone on one of my son's class trips.
3
: any of a class of proteins (such as heat shock proteins) that facilitate the proper folding of proteins by binding to and stabilizing unfolded or partially folded proteins

called also molecular chaperone

chaperone

2 of 2

verb

variants or less commonly chaperon
chaperoned; chaperoning

transitive verb

1
: escort
2
: to act as chaperone to or for
chaperone a dance
chaperoning teenagers

intransitive verb

: to act as a chaperone
Two parents chaperoned at the school dance.
chaperonage noun

Example Sentences

Noun I was a chaperone on one of my son's school trips. Verb Two parents chaperoned the children. My mom always chaperoned the school dances.
Recent Examples on the Web
Noun
But given the brutal regime's oppressiveness toward women, forbidding them from even traveling without a male chaperone or receiving an education, the members of the Female Tactical Platoon had an even bigger bulls-eye. Ethan Barton, Fox News, 24 Nov. 2022 The whole school was invited to join the ride, and about 75 students showed up, many bringing their parents along to help chaperone. Sydney Page, Washington Post, 11 Oct. 2022 Starting Thursday, any chaperone who attends Knott’s Scary Farm at the Buena Park theme park with five minors will be given complimentary admission to use that same night. Melissa Gomez, Los Angeles Times, 28 Sep. 2022 According to depositions from Kappes and other students on the trip, the only other chaperone was Coleman’s friend David DeMetz, a paramedic in his mid-twenties. Longreads, 16 Mar. 2012 The theme park instituted the chaperone policy after multiple fights broke out and forced the park to close three hours early in July. Melissa Gomez, Los Angeles Times, 28 Sep. 2022 In 2016, the board unanimously rejected a request from Gupta to drop the chaperone requirement because, his lawyer said, the restriction was keeping Gupta from gaining privileges at a hospital. Kate Farrish, Hartford Courant, 20 Sep. 2022 Oaks Park, the venerable amusement park located in Southeast Portland, has instituted a new chaperone policy for its skating rink. oregonlive, 22 Aug. 2022 For now, as the bots learn the lay of the land, a chaperone will accompany them on deliveries that involve crossing a street. Kelly Meyerhofer, Journal Sentinel, 16 Sep. 2022
Verb
All that changes when she is forced to chaperone her autistic sister. Liza Foreman, Variety, 20 Oct. 2022 The field trip has happened for a decade, but went largely unnoticed until this week, when Leonardi posted photos on social media saying she was honored to chaperone it. Scott Travis, sun-sentinel.com, 29 Oct. 2021 Some people would rather chaperone the Zombie Prom than ask for a bump in pay. Amy Lindgren, Twin Cities, 26 Oct. 2019 Attendees must be 22 or younger, although parents may chaperone their teens. Web Behrens, chicagotribune.com, 14 Oct. 2019 King was prepared to chaperone the trip and carry her daughter the whole way, but someone reached out with a suggestion. Caitlin O'kane, CBS News, 24 Sep. 2019 Students came to us and asked us to chaperone them to Europe for six weeks. orlandosentinel.com, 20 July 2019 Fleury Drive resident Cameron Drew expressed concerns about how well Black might be able to chaperone a group of teenagers. Annie Gentile, courant.com, 19 July 2019 Tena’s older sister, who lives near Sacramento, would drive two-and-a-half hours south to Salinas to pick her up, take her to the meetings, then chaperone her home again—eight hours of driving each time. Lauren Smiley, The Atlantic, 23 May 2018 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'chaperone.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

Word History

Etymology

Noun and Verb

French chaperon, literally, hood, from Middle French, head covering, from chape

First Known Use

Noun

1720, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1802, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of chaperone was in 1720

Dictionary Entries Near chaperone

Cite this Entry

“Chaperone.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/chaperone. Accessed 5 Dec. 2022.

Kids Definition

chaperone 1 of 2

noun

chap·​er·​one
variants or chaperon
: a person who goes with and is responsible for a young woman or a group of young people (as at a dance)

chaperone

2 of 2

verb

variants or chaperon
chaperoned; chaperoning
: to act or go with as a chaperone

Medical Definition

chaperone

noun

chap·​er·​one ˈshap-ə-ˌrōn How to pronounce chaperone (audio)
variants or chaperone protein
: any of a class of proteins (such as heat shock proteins and chaperonins) that facilitate the proper folding of proteins by binding to and stabilizing unfolded or partially folded proteins
As the proteins are produced, molecules called chaperones fold them into the three-dimensional form they are supposed to take. Andres M. Lozano et al., Scientific American,

called also molecular chaperone

More from Merriam-Webster on chaperone

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