cause

noun
\ ˈkȯz How to pronounce cause (audio) \

Definition of cause

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : a reason for an action or condition : motive
b : something that brings about an effect or a result trying to find the cause of the accident
c : a person or thing that is the occasion of an action or state a cause for celebration especially : an agent that brings something about She is the cause of your troubles.
d : sufficient reason discharged for cause
2a : a ground of legal action
b : case They are paid by the cause for their expert opinions.
3 : a matter or question to be decided The city council is involved with school department causes.
4a : a principle or movement militantly defended or supported the insurgents' cause
b : a charitable undertaking for a good cause

cause

verb
caused; causing

Definition of cause (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to serve as a cause or occasion of cause an accident
2 : to compel by command, authority, or force caused him to resign

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Other Words from cause

Noun

causeless \ ˈkȯz-​ləs How to pronounce causeless (audio) \ adjective

Verb

causer noun

Examples of cause in a Sentence

Noun

His symptoms had no apparent physical causes. She is the cause of all their problems. The medicine was prescribed without good cause. Their marriage was a cause for celebration. I can support a cause that means something to me. I'm willing to donate money as long as it's for a good cause.

Verb

He swerved and caused an accident. The flood caused great hardship. The illness is caused by a virus. The flood caused the town great hardship. You caused us a lot of extra work.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Barreto helped his cause by hitting .358 over his last 40 games with Las Vegas. Ron Kroichick, SFChronicle.com, "A’s second baseman Franklin Barreto sits, Profar starts vs. White Sox," 12 July 2019 Young agreed, and pointed to his creation of the Office of Children & Family Success as one example of his administration’s focus not just on the violence, but on its root causes. Kevin Rector, baltimoresun.com, "‘Suffocating’ violence: Despite national trend, killings increase in Baltimore through first half of 2019," 11 July 2019 Each tea order at the restaurant counts as a vote for their cause through July 18. Chris Sims, Indianapolis Star, "How to score free McAlister's Deli tea, vote in Tea Town Showdown," 9 July 2019 But meantime the rest of us should cheer the courage and resilience of the Hong Kong people who refused to bow to Beijing’s orders even when their cause looked hopeless. The Editorial Board, WSJ, "People Power, Hong Kong-Style," 9 July 2019 The original writers of the Declaration intended to produce a document to reassure Americans of the justness of their cause, and to appeal to potential supporters abroad. Charles Edel, Twin Cities, "Charles Edel: How the Declaration of Independence became a beacon to the world," 7 July 2019 Maduro, however, refused to step aside and Guaidó has not been successful in urging the critical mass of soldiers to support his cause. Fox News, "Maduro displays military power in Independence Day celebration," 6 July 2019 Rather than playing into their narrative and fueling their cause, conservatives could be helping to reduce the outsized authority of their voices. Sahil Handa, National Review, "What Conservatives Get Wrong about the Campus Wars," 4 July 2019 In recent survey, 52% of millennial women said that money is their number one cause of anxiety. Kathleen Newman-bremang, refinery29.com, "Money Diaries Is Coming To Canada! Here's How To Submit Yours," 3 July 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

His father studied salmon migrations in the Russian Arctic and showed him the damage industrial pollution had caused to salmon spawning grounds. Devin Kelly, Anchorage Daily News, "Using fungi, UAA team develops biodegradable insulation for shipping Alaska seafood," 14 July 2019 Questions like that focus on the person who has been harmed, instead of the person who has caused harm. San Diego Union-Tribune, "Preventing violence and abuse by working to create better communities," 13 July 2019 If Ilhan Omar isn’t causing Pelosi trouble, Ocasio-Cortez is. Matthew Continetti, National Review, "Pelosi’s House of Pain," 13 July 2019 Experts also suggest thoroughly washing and drying any material which may have come in contact with sea lice as to not cause any post-beach trip stings and rashes. Brittany Brown, baltimoresun.com, "Sea lice have been stinging at Virginia Beach. Is Ocean City next?," 13 July 2019 The slow-moving storm in the Gulf of Mexico was expected to make landfall in Louisiana on Saturday, bringing strong winds and heavy rain that forecasters predict could cause flooding over a wide region going into next week. Minyvonne Burke, NBC News, "Barry strengthens to a hurricane as it heads toward the Louisiana coast," 13 July 2019 Immigration raids expected to begin on Sunday have reignited fears across immigrant communities throughout the country, causing an uptick in hotline calls in cities like Miami and Houston, which are expected to be targeted. Jasmine Aguilera, Time, "With ICE Raids Expected On Sunday, Here's How Groups That Work With Migrants Are Getting Ready," 12 July 2019 He was convicted of causing more than $2,500 worth of property damage, fleeing and eluding an officer and second-degree recklessly endangering safety, all felonies. Cathy Kozlowicz, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "The Milwaukee man who was shot by Menomonee Falls police after a gas drive-off has been convicted of several charges," 12 July 2019 Built like a champ At 6 feet tall and 146 pounds, Lawrence's length and mobility cause a real problem for fighters on the ground. Robert Rimpson, The Courier-Journal, "MMA fighter Lance 'The Tornado' Lawrence is one fight away from his UFC dream," 12 July 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'cause.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of cause

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for cause

Noun

Middle English, borrowed from Anglo-French, borrowed from Latin causa "judicial proceedings, interests of one side in a judicial case, plea, pretext, ground of action, motive, reason," of uncertain origin

Verb

Middle English causen, borrowed from Anglo-French & Medieval Latin; Anglo-French causer, borrowed from Medieval Latin causāre, causārī "to plead, accuse, blame, serve as the cause of, occasion," going back to Latin causārī "to plead an action in law, plead as an excuse," derivative of causa "judicial proceedings, plea, cause entry 1"

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Statistics for cause

Last Updated

16 Jul 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for cause

The first known use of cause was in the 13th century

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More Definitions for cause

cause

noun

English Language Learners Definition of cause

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: something or someone that produces an effect, result, or condition : something or someone that makes something happen or exist
: a reason for doing or feeling something
: something (such as an organization, belief, idea, or goal) that a group or people support or fight for

cause

verb

English Language Learners Definition of cause (Entry 2 of 2)

: to make (something) happen or exist : to be the cause of (something)
: to make (someone) feel, have, or do something

cause

noun
\ ˈkȯz How to pronounce cause (audio) \

Kids Definition of cause

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1 : a person or thing that brings about a result Carelessness is the cause of many accidents.
2 : a good or good enough reason for something His return was a cause for rejoicing.
3 : something supported or deserving support a worthy cause

cause

verb
caused; causing

Kids Definition of cause (Entry 2 of 3)

: to make happen or exist You'll cause an accident.

cause

conjunction
\ ˈkȯz How to pronounce cause (audio) , ˈkəz\

Kids Definition of cause (Entry 3 of 3)

cause

noun

Legal Definition of cause

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : something that brings about an effect or result the negligent act which was the cause of the plaintiff's injury

Note: The cause of an injury must be proven in both tort and criminal cases.

actual cause
: cause in fact in this entry
but-for cause
: cause in fact in this entry
cause in fact
: a cause without which the result would not have occurred

called also actual cause, but-for cause

concurrent cause
: a cause that joins simultaneously with another cause to produce a result

called also concurring cause

— compare intervening cause and superseding cause in this entry
direct cause
: proximate cause in this entry
efficient intervening cause
: superseding cause in this entry
intervening cause
1 : an independent cause that follows another cause in time in producing the result but does not interrupt the chain of causation if foreseeable

called also supervening cause

— compare concurrent cause and superseding cause in this entry
2 : superseding cause in this entry
legal cause
: proximate cause in this entry
procuring cause
: one (as a broker) that sets in motion a continuous series of events culminating especially in the sale or leasing of real estate entitled to a commission as the procuring cause of the sale even though the listing had expired
producing cause
: an efficient, exciting, or contributing cause (as an act, practice, or event) that produces an injury which would not have occurred without it claimed that the workplace accident was a producing cause of his disability used especially in workers' compensation and consumer protection cases

Note: A producing cause lacks the element of foreseeability associated with a proximate cause, being more exclusively concerned with causation in fact.

proximate cause
: a cause that sets in motion a sequence of events uninterrupted by any superseding causes and that results in a usually foreseeable effect (as an injury) which would not otherwise have occurred

called also direct cause, legal cause

— see also Palsgraf v. Long Island Railroad Co. — compare remote cause in this entry
remote cause
: a cause that is followed by a superseding cause interrupting the chain of causation also : a cause that in ordinary experience does not lead to a particular effect — compare proximate cause in this entry
superseding cause
: an unforeseeable intervening cause that interrupts the chain of causation and becomes the proximate cause of the effect

called also efficient intervening cause, intervening cause

— compare concurrent cause and intervening cause in this entry
supervening cause
: intervening cause in this entry
2 : a reason or justification for an action or state (as belief): as
a : good cause in this entry an appeal dismissed for cause
b : just cause in this entry behavior that constitutes cause to terminate an employee

Note: The circumstances under which cause, good cause, just cause, probable cause, reasonable cause, or sufficient cause exists are determined on a case by case basis. These terms are often used interchangeably, and the distinctions between them are sometimes unclear.

good cause
: a substantial reason put forth in good faith that is not unreasonable, arbitrary, or irrational and that is sufficient to create an excuse for an act under the law unable to show good cause for failure to pay child support neglect of duty is good cause for removal of a trustee
just cause
1 : cause that a person of ordinary intelligence would consider a fair and reasonable justification for an act used especially in cases involving termination of employment and denial of unemployment benefits
2 : good cause in this entry
probable cause \ ˈprä-​bə-​bəl-​ \
1 : a reasonable ground in fact and circumstance for a belief in the existence of certain circumstances (as that an offense has been or is being committed, that a person is guilty of an offense, that a particular search will uncover contraband, that an item to be seized is in a particular place, or that a specific fact or cause of action exists) when supported by probable cause, warrantless search of vehicle may extend to every part of vehicle where objects of search might be concealedState v. Nixon, 593 N.E.2d 1210 (1992)

called also reasonable cause, sufficient cause

— compare reasonable suspicion

Note: The Fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution stipulates that “no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause.” Probable cause is also required for a warrantless arrest. Probable cause is an objective standard rather than a function of subjective opinion or suspicion not grounded in fact or circumstance. However, the facts or circumstances need not be of the nature of certainty necessary to establish proof in court.

2 : justification for an administrative search based on a showing that it is to be conducted in accordance with standardized nonarbitrary regulatory procedures designed to further public interest in regulatory enforcement that outweighs the intrusiveness of the search
reasonable cause
1 : probable cause in this entry also : a fact or circumstance that justifies a reasonable suspicion — compare reasonable suspicion
2 : a reason that would motivate a person of ordinary intelligence under the circumstances reasonable cause to believe abuse had occurred
3 : something (as an event or the exercise of ordinary care or prudence) that excuses or justifies failure to file a tax return on time
sufficient cause
: cause that is deemed enough to provide an excuse under the law: as
a : good cause in this entry often used in the phrase good and sufficient cause
b : probable cause in this entry
3a : a ground of a legal action tortious conduct is not a cause of divorce embraced within the statutory cause of cruel and inhuman treatmentCase & Comment
b : case questions of law…determinative of the cause then pending— R. T. Gerwatowski
4 in the civil law of Louisiana : the reason for making a contract — compare frustration sense 2

Note: Under the Louisiana Civil Code, if a contract's cause is illicit or immoral, the contract is absolutely null. If the cause fails after the contract is made (as when a leased building cannot be occupied because of a fire), the contract may either be not enforced or only partially enforced.

caused; causing

Legal Definition of cause (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to serve as the cause of the scales struck the plaintiff causing injuries for which she suesPalsgraf v. Long Island R.R. Co., 162 N.E. 99 (1928)
2 : to effect by command, authority, or force the administrator shall cause an investigation to be made

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More from Merriam-Webster on cause

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with cause

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for cause

Spanish Central: Translation of cause

Nglish: Translation of cause for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of cause for Arabic Speakers

Comments on cause

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