cascade

noun
cas·​cade | \ (ˌ)kas-ˈkād How to pronounce cascade (audio) \

Definition of cascade

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a steep usually small fall of water especially : one of a series
2a : something arranged or occurring in a series or in a succession of stages so that each stage derives from or acts upon the product of the preceding blood clotting involves a biochemical cascade
b : a fall of material (such as lace) that hangs in a zigzag line and that is used especially in clothing and draperies
3 : something falling or rushing forth in quantity a cascade of sound a cascade of events Her hair was arranged in a cascade of curls.

cascade

verb
cascaded; cascading

Definition of cascade (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to fall, pour, or rush in or as if in a cascade The water cascaded over the rocks. Her hair cascaded down around her shoulders.

transitive verb

1 : to cause to fall like a cascade
2 : to connect in a cascade arrangement

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Synonyms for cascade

Synonyms: Noun

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Examples of cascade in a Sentence

Noun Her hair was arranged in a cascade of curls. That decision set off a cascade of events. Verb The water cascades over the rocks. Her hair cascaded down around her shoulders.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Cataract Falls: Parking usually fills here quickly on weekends (do not block the road), especially after a rainstorm when Cataract Creek turns into a series of gorgeous small cascades in lush forest. Tom Stienstra, SFChronicle.com, "While turkey roasts, mark the day with a short getaway," 28 Nov. 2019 Behind it six columns of the same dark teal are fountains that spray water cascades. Judy Rose, Detroit Free Press, "$1.1M Shelby Township home is one of the most visually striking in SE Michigan," 23 Nov. 2019 The cheese is American, melted in an oozing cascade. Mike Sutter, ExpressNews.com, "52 Weeks of Burgers: Mr. Juicy," 22 Nov. 2019 Fingers of flame clutch the top of the ridge, then embers cascade over the near side of the canyon. Dan Zak, Washington Post, "California will never stop burning," 4 Nov. 2019 Television footage showed plumes of smoke rising from the area but no walls of towering flame, as a water-dropping helicopter moved in to dump another cascade on the blaze. Anchorage Daily News, "Authorities: 3 deaths tied to Southern California wildfires," 12 Oct. 2019 An endless cascade of cold beer and homemade fruity schnapps keeps spirits abuzz. Danielle Bernabe, National Geographic, "Eat, drink, and herd cattle at this Austrian festival," 15 Sep. 2019 From there, short but steep trails lead to the river and its cascades. Chelsey Lewis, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "When you visit Copper Falls, check out this hidden gem of a waterfall nearby," 15 Aug. 2019 From there, diners can survey the many passers-by in the residential neighborhood, and, when the weather turns, settle into the eatery’s warmth while watching snowflakes cascade to the sidewalk. Daliah Singer, The Know, "Restaurant review: At Spuntino, a meal is something to be savored and shared," 10 July 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The administration official who flagged Trump’s attempt to get the Ukrainian president to target one of his potential opponents in the 2020 race set off a cascading series of events that has resulted in an impeachment inquiry. Alex Shephard, The New Republic, "Why Anonymous’s Trump Tell-All Is a Sham," 24 Oct. 2019 Because the 70,000-square-mile electric system is, in many ways, interconnected, turning off one high-voltage circuit can lead to a cascading effect on customers far away. Peter Fimrite, SFChronicle.com, "Frustration over power shut-offs as some areas have no power — and no wind," 10 Oct. 2019 The cascading effects of climate change on the world’s oceans stem from the incredible amount of heat and CO2 the ocean absorbs: More than 90% of excess heat in the climate system has been taken up by the ocean since 1970. Zoë Schlanger, Quartz, "Dramatically change society to curb climate change or drown in higher sea levels, warns a new UN report," 25 Sep. 2019 What would come to be known as The Blob persisted until 2016, and had a number of cascading effects on the oceanic ecosystem. oregonlive, "Climate change and the ocean: What the latest UN report means for the Oregon coast," 25 Sep. 2019 The company plans to liquidate its assets, punctuating a swift collapse of its operations that involved a cascading series of store closures in recent months. Nathan Bomey, USA TODAY, "Fred's to close all of its stores in Chapter 11 bankruptcy liquidation," 9 Sep. 2019 Using rescue dogs and shovels, rescuers combed through the remains of homes destroyed Sunday when cascading flows of volcanic matter erupted from Guatemala’s Volcano of Fire about 35 miles west of the capital, Guatemala City. Carolina Gamazo And Kate Linthicum, latimes.com, "Rescuers frantically dig through ash after Guatemala volcano kills at least 62," 4 June 2018 The announcement comes after a cascading series of missteps from the brand. Leah Prinzivalli, Allure, "Victoria’s Secret Announced Its First Plus-Size Model — But There's a Catch," 9 Oct. 2019 The prolific photographer depicted Yosemite Valley’s massive granite walls and cascading waterfalls in his landscape shots—images that were instrumental in establishing Yosemite National Park. National Geographic, "Yosemite and San Francisco Photography Workshop," 10 Sep. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'cascade.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of cascade

Noun

1641, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1702, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

History and Etymology for cascade

Noun and Verb

French, from Italian cascata, from cascare to fall, from Vulgar Latin *casicare, from Latin casus fall

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Time Traveler for cascade

Time Traveler

The first known use of cascade was in 1641

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Statistics for cascade

Last Updated

3 Dec 2019

Cite this Entry

“Cascade.” The Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster Inc., https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/cascading. Accessed 8 December 2019.

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More Definitions for cascade

cascade

noun
How to pronounce cascade (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of cascade

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a small, steep waterfall especially : one that is part of a series of waterfalls
: a large amount of something that flows or hangs down
: a large number of things that happen quickly in a series

cascade

verb

English Language Learners Definition of cascade (Entry 2 of 2)

: to flow or hang down in large amounts

cascade

noun
cas·​cade | \ ka-ˈskād How to pronounce cascade (audio) \

Kids Definition of cascade

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a steep usually small waterfall

cascade

verb
cascaded; cascading

Kids Definition of cascade (Entry 2 of 2)

: to flow or fall rapidly and in large quantity Tears cascaded from the baby's eyes.

cascade

noun
cas·​cade | \ (ˌ)kas-ˈkād How to pronounce cascade (audio) \

Medical Definition of cascade

: a molecular, biochemical, or physiological process occurring in a succession of stages each of which is closely related to or depends on the output of the previous stage a cascade of enzymatic reactions the cascade of events comprising the immune response

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Comments on cascade

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