cascade

noun
cas·​cade | \ (ˌ)kas-ˈkād How to pronounce cascade (audio) \

Definition of cascade

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a steep usually small fall of water especially : one of a series
2a : something arranged or occurring in a series or in a succession of stages so that each stage derives from or acts upon the product of the preceding blood clotting involves a biochemical cascade
b : a fall of material (such as lace) that hangs in a zigzag line and that is used especially in clothing and draperies
3 : something falling or rushing forth in quantity a cascade of sound a cascade of events Her hair was arranged in a cascade of curls.

cascade

verb
cascaded; cascading

Definition of cascade (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to fall, pour, or rush in or as if in a cascade The water cascaded over the rocks. Her hair cascaded down around her shoulders.

transitive verb

1 : to cause to fall like a cascade
2 : to connect in a cascade arrangement

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Synonyms for cascade

Synonyms: Noun

cataract, fall(s), waterfall

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Examples of cascade in a Sentence

Noun

Her hair was arranged in a cascade of curls. That decision set off a cascade of events.

Verb

The water cascades over the rocks. Her hair cascaded down around her shoulders.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Merkel, however, is determined that Germany shouldn’t take unilateral action without agreement with other EU countries, fearing a cascade of uncoordinated decisions that could further fray European unity. Washington Post, "Germany’s Merkel faces race against time in migrant standoff," 27 June 2018 For an unexpected, subtle look, tie a skinny scarf in a sweet little bow and let the ends cascade down the side of your outfit. 5. Kaitlin Menza, Redbook, "11 Fun, Fresh Ways to Wear a Scarf," 22 Aug. 2017 So [learning of the firm’s work] started a whole cascade of questions. Samantha Weiss Hills, Curbed, "Embracing nature—and minimalism—in North Carolina," 26 Nov. 2018 Trout had faced Cook 12 times previously, but not since 2015, after which Cook suffered a cascade of injuries. Tom Verducci, SI.com, "The Star That Still Won't Shine: The Incredible, Unprecedented but Unseen Greatness of Mike Trout," 12 July 2018 The administration approach has drawn a cascade of criticism in recent days. Author: Peter Baker, Anchorage Daily News, "Voices in both parties call for halt to practice of separating families at border," 18 June 2018 Erroneous signals from that single sensor, which began as the plane lifted off the runway and continued throughout the roughly 11-minute flight, resulted in a cascade of stall warnings and other cockpit alerts. Ben Otto, WSJ, "Maintenance Lapse Identified as Initial Problem Leading to Lion Air Crash," 25 Dec. 2018 In the latest incident, the cascade of erupting fires and explosions started to hit Lawrence, Andover and North Andover at about 4:30 p.m. Thursday. Russell Gold, WSJ, "Pipe Pressure Eyed in Gas Blasts," 14 Sep. 2018 The cascade of picayune tariffs and aggressive trade rhetoric directed indiscriminately against allies and competitors alike could inflict lasting damage on US companies’ ability to compete globally. Zachary Karabell, WIRED, "Trump's Trade War Won't Hurt China. It Could Hurt US Tech," 27 June 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

The singer/Met Gala co-host/Queen of Camp showed up to this year's Met Gala in a massive hot pink Brandon Maxwell gown, complete with a cascading train and a giant matching bow on her head. Lauren Alexis Fisher, Harper's BAZAAR, "Lady Gaga Just Had 4 Outfit Changes on the Met Gala Red Carpet and We’re Deceased," 6 May 2019 My guess is that there was a cascading event — a pole that fell, and that pole pulled down the other poles. Lewis Kamb, The Seattle Times, "City Light releases more details on poles that collapsed, but says it still doesn’t know why they toppled," 11 Apr. 2019 The piece itself is an expression of the celebrated Chaine d’Ancre link created by Robert Dumas in 1938, and it can just as easily be worn classically in front or cascading down the back. Vogue, "Hermès’s Chaine d’Ancre Turns 80 This Year, and Pierre Hardy Has Created a High Jewelry Collection to Celebrate It," 3 July 2018 The mid-April floods sent brown mud and water cascading into these fields. The muck is packed with nitrogen, so it’s as though a big kick of fertilizer walloped taro patches. Audrey Mcavoy, BostonGlobe.com, "Shortage of key Hawaii crop expected after rains swamp farms," 28 May 2018 The mid-April floods sent brown mud and water cascading into these fields. Audrey Mcavoy, The Seattle Times, "Shortage of key Hawaii crop expected after rains swamp farms," 28 May 2018 As Wey cleans, his lilting Nigerian accent seems to cascade across bare counter tops and barrel into the newly empty shelves, elevating his voice few a decibels above normal. Justin Phillips, San Francisco Chronicle, "Listen up, San Francisco: Tunde Wey wants to talk about wealth inequality," 6 Mar. 2018 Her wavy hair cascaded down to her shoulders and framed her face. Marina Liao, Marie Claire, "Kate Middleton Used This Hack on Her Alexander McQueen Dress," 12 Mar. 2019 Dramatic gowns of rainbow confection cascaded down a sweeping staircase. Lauren Alexis Fisher, Harper's BAZAAR, "This New Japanese Designer Just Put the Magic Back in New York Fashion Week," 9 Feb. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'cascade.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of cascade

Noun

1641, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1702, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

History and Etymology for cascade

Noun and Verb

French, from Italian cascata, from cascare to fall, from Vulgar Latin *casicare, from Latin casus fall

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Statistics for cascade

Last Updated

21 May 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for cascade

The first known use of cascade was in 1641

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More Definitions for cascade

cascade

noun

English Language Learners Definition of cascade

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a small, steep waterfall especially : one that is part of a series of waterfalls
: a large amount of something that flows or hangs down
: a large number of things that happen quickly in a series

cascade

verb

English Language Learners Definition of cascade (Entry 2 of 2)

: to flow or hang down in large amounts

cascade

noun
cas·​cade | \ ka-ˈskād How to pronounce cascade (audio) \

Kids Definition of cascade

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a steep usually small waterfall

cascade

verb
cascaded; cascading

Kids Definition of cascade (Entry 2 of 2)

: to flow or fall rapidly and in large quantity Tears cascaded from the baby's eyes.

cascade

noun
cas·​cade | \ (ˌ)kas-ˈkād How to pronounce cascade (audio) \

Medical Definition of cascade

: a molecular, biochemical, or physiological process occurring in a succession of stages each of which is closely related to or depends on the output of the previous stage a cascade of enzymatic reactions the cascade of events comprising the immune response

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Comments on cascade

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