cascade

noun
cas·​cade | \ (ˌ)kas-ˈkād How to pronounce cascade (audio) \

Definition of cascade

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a steep usually small fall of water especially : one of a series
2a : something arranged or occurring in a series or in a succession of stages so that each stage derives from or acts upon the product of the preceding blood clotting involves a biochemical cascade
b : a fall of material (such as lace) that hangs in a zigzag line and that is used especially in clothing and draperies
3 : something falling or rushing forth in quantity a cascade of sound a cascade of events Her hair was arranged in a cascade of curls.

cascade

verb
cascaded; cascading

Definition of cascade (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to fall, pour, or rush in or as if in a cascade The water cascaded over the rocks. Her hair cascaded down around her shoulders.

transitive verb

1 : to cause to fall like a cascade
2 : to connect in a cascade arrangement

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Synonyms for cascade

Synonyms: Noun

cataract, fall(s), waterfall

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Examples of cascade in a Sentence

Noun

Her hair was arranged in a cascade of curls. That decision set off a cascade of events.

Verb

The water cascades over the rocks. Her hair cascaded down around her shoulders.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Such cascades, the researchers calculated, could speed up the collapse in West Antarctica and bring one on in Greenland. The Economist, "Climate change is a remorseless threat to the world’s coasts," 17 Aug. 2019 Richard Russo's new novel, Chances Are..., opens with a cascade of charm. Ron Charles, Dallas News, "In Richard Russo's 'Chances Are...,' a charming reunion unearths a chilling disappearance," 30 July 2019 Any disruption in one line can create trouble for another, causing a cascade of delays and service issues across all BOS lines. USA TODAY, "‘Lorax’ tree legend, butter Elmo, meth squirrel: News from around our 50 states," 19 June 2019 When the name was spoken, a great radiance opened up in the heavens and flowed down over Quichotte in a cascade of joy. Salman Rushdie, The New Yorker, "The Little King," 22 July 2019 In contrast, disgust appears to mainly trigger the PNS, causing a cascade of physiological changes including pupil constriction. Natasha Lavender, SELF, "Is Trypophobia Really a Fear of Holes or Something Else Entirely?," 26 July 2019 The freshman council was set to consider erecting an emergency homeless shelter to stave off a likely cascade of homeless deaths due to large homeless encampments that had popped up in Maxwell and La Palma parks. Ben Brazil, Daily Pilot, "The low-key Taorminas channeled their success in business into helping the homeless," 15 July 2019 More of those gases in the atmosphere will trap more heat, unleashing a cascade of unpredictable effects. David Von Drehle, Twin Cities, "David Von Drehle: There’s no scientific consensus that humanity is doomed," 14 July 2019 At the Eastridge Market, the mini-mart was doing a brisk business despite aisles awash in a sticky stew of liquor and broken glass from a cascade of bottles that the quake sent cascading to the floor. Chris Woodyard, USA TODAY, "Earthquakes ravaged Los Angeles and San Francisco. So, what spared this city in the California desert?," 9 July 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Hot grease cascaded over the left side of her body. Matthew Vantryon, Indianapolis Star, "Jessie Lanzer beat cancer with a smile and a laugh. She brought her community with her.," 4 Sep. 2019 Rigaux started recording and captured video of the massive rockfall as entire swath of the cliff cascaded into the lake, raising a plume of water and dust. Ryan Prior, CNN, "A group of kayakers on Lake Superior narrowly missed a collapsing sandstone cliff," 15 Aug. 2019 That’s because casualty situations often cascade, and additional problems may arise concurrently. Georgia Frances King, Quartz, "The world’s most famous explorers on how they handle high-stress situations," 14 Aug. 2019 In 2019, the money cascaded into a different outlet. Andrew Kenney, The Denver Post, "Outside groups spent more than $1 million to influence Denver’s election, and it took a lot of work to figure that out," 17 June 2019 And wildlife depends on snow, from wolverines who dig into the icy stuff, to fish that bask in chilly meltwater cascading down mountainsides. Alejandra Borunda, National Geographic, "'Snow droughts' are coming for the American West," 14 Aug. 2019 In any case, there’s often little use in speculating about how barely perceptible yet still insidious events can cascade into disastrous results and whether or not your circumstances will save you. Leta Shy, SELF, "Allyson Felix Wants to Save Black Mothers," 30 July 2019 When the flood hit on July 30, 2016, Milani, 43, rescued 47 guests and eight employees from water cascading into the restaurant. Erin B. Logan, baltimoresun.com, "Former Ellicott City and Hogan chef lands gig at Columbia restaurant," 2 July 2019 The look in question featured a stark middle part and thick curls cascading down her chest, stopping just above her breasts. Kaleigh Fasanella, Allure, "Margot Robbie Just Debuted Curly Hair for the First Time," 30 Apr. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'cascade.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of cascade

Noun

1641, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1702, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

History and Etymology for cascade

Noun and Verb

French, from Italian cascata, from cascare to fall, from Vulgar Latin *casicare, from Latin casus fall

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Statistics for cascade

Last Updated

27 Aug 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for cascade

The first known use of cascade was in 1641

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More Definitions for cascade

cascade

noun

English Language Learners Definition of cascade

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a small, steep waterfall especially : one that is part of a series of waterfalls
: a large amount of something that flows or hangs down
: a large number of things that happen quickly in a series

cascade

verb

English Language Learners Definition of cascade (Entry 2 of 2)

: to flow or hang down in large amounts

cascade

noun
cas·​cade | \ ka-ˈskād How to pronounce cascade (audio) \

Kids Definition of cascade

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a steep usually small waterfall

cascade

verb
cascaded; cascading

Kids Definition of cascade (Entry 2 of 2)

: to flow or fall rapidly and in large quantity Tears cascaded from the baby's eyes.

cascade

noun
cas·​cade | \ (ˌ)kas-ˈkād How to pronounce cascade (audio) \

Medical Definition of cascade

: a molecular, biochemical, or physiological process occurring in a succession of stages each of which is closely related to or depends on the output of the previous stage a cascade of enzymatic reactions the cascade of events comprising the immune response

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Comments on cascade

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