cascade

noun
cas·​cade | \ (ˌ)kas-ˈkād How to pronounce cascade (audio) \

Definition of cascade

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a steep usually small fall of water especially : one of a series
2a : something arranged or occurring in a series or in a succession of stages so that each stage derives from or acts upon the product of the preceding blood clotting involves a biochemical cascade
b : a fall of material (such as lace) that hangs in a zigzag line and that is used especially in clothing and draperies
3 : something falling or rushing forth in quantity a cascade of sound a cascade of events Her hair was arranged in a cascade of curls.

cascade

verb
cascaded; cascading

Definition of cascade (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to fall, pour, or rush in or as if in a cascade The water cascaded over the rocks. Her hair cascaded down around her shoulders.

transitive verb

1 : to cause to fall like a cascade
2 : to connect in a cascade arrangement

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Synonyms for cascade

Synonyms: Noun

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Examples of cascade in a Sentence

Noun Her hair was arranged in a cascade of curls. That decision set off a cascade of events. Verb The water cascades over the rocks. Her hair cascaded down around her shoulders.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun In the deepening dusk, a graceful cascade of fireworks drops into my lap. Roger Naylor, azcentral, "When stay at home ends: This Arizona neon sign park glows nightly. Here's how to see it," 20 Apr. 2020 In recent days, a cascade of selling has hit the market for mortgage bonds, helping spark unprecedented action by the Federal Reserve on Monday morning to aid markets. Ben Eisen, WSJ, "Mortgage Firm Struggles to Meet Margin Calls as Market Turmoil Continues," 23 Mar. 2020 After the confirmation of Alaska’s first novel coronavirus case, a cascade of closures and cancellations rippled through the state this week as officials and others sought increased precautions against the spread of the virus. Morgan Krakow, Anchorage Daily News, "Cancellations and closures sweep across Alaska in wake of state’s first coronavirus case," 15 Mar. 2020 Suicide and social media in the suburbs: A cascade of hearts, a sense of loss Steel and glass were, at one point, shiny, new toys (pun intended) in the world of architecture. Nathaniel Morris, chicagotribune.com, "Even suicidal patients are put on the ER wait list," 23 May 2018 Barely five months later, the China fiasco was front-of-mind for some league officials who were now grappling with the cascade of worrying -- and likely even costlier -- news about the coronavirus pandemic. Don Riddell, CNN, "From Chinese controversy to Kobe's death and finally coronavirus; this NBA season will live long in the memory," 7 Apr. 2020 Then there was Rowan Blanchard, who paired her hot pink makeup with a cascade of shoulder-skimming spirals, finessed by hairstylist Clayton Hawkins. Akili King, Vogue, "The Best Beauty Instagrams of the Week: Zazie Beetz, Rowan Blanchard, and More," 15 Dec. 2019 That declaration, issued a month ago this week, prompted a cascade of measures by governors and other officials that have essentially halted public life in the U.S. in a frantic effort to limit COVID-19’s spread. USA Today, "Golf, handshakes and a Mar-a-Lago conga line: Squandered week highlights Trump’s lack of COVID-19 focus," 10 Apr. 2020 But when the World Health Organization declared the novel coronavirus, which causes the disease COVID-19, a global pandemic, a cascade of sports games, festivals and other mass gatherings were postponed or canceled outright. Perry Vandell, azcentral, "Widespread cancellations devastate Arizona Airbnb hosts amid coronavirus pandemic," 24 Mar. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb This can have a cascading effect on banks’ finances due to their recent focus on the retail segment. Prathamesh Mulye, Quartz India, "Indian banks’ bet on retail loans may have misfired due to coronavirus pandemic," 20 Apr. 2020 The shutdown of auto plants owned by Ford, General Motors, and Fiat Chrysler has a cascading effect on the many companies that supply them with parts. Bisma Parvez, Detroit Free Press, "Coronavirus is hurting every sector of Michigan's economy," 20 Mar. 2020 The cascading effect that the spreading of the virus will have on health care systems is gravely concerning, Sinema said. Ronald J. Hansen, azcentral, "Sen. Kyrsten Sinema, others demand Gov. Doug Ducey do more to stop coronavirus," 19 Mar. 2020 Then came the financial crisis in 2008, which has had cascading effects for millennials and shaped many of their young political leaders. Charlotte Alter, Time, "How Millennial Leaders Will Change America," 23 Jan. 2020 The tongue broke away from the rock below, and the ice went cascading down the mountain. Chelsea Harvey, Scientific American, "Warming Caused a Glacier in Alaska to Collapse," 4 May 2020 There would be wildly intertwined flora cascading from the roof of a greenhouse, set against the sublime backdrop of a Moroccan-red sunset. Amanda Randone, refinery29.com, "I Was Supposed To Get Married Last Weekend — Here’s What I Did Instead," 3 Apr. 2020 The case exposes the profound harm of street justice in cities such as San Francisco, with tit-for-tat attacks often cascading for years. Evan Sernoffsky, SFChronicle.com, "At age 12, he watched his brother get killed. Now SF teen is accused of revenge slaying," 25 Nov. 2019 Named after a Creek Indian princess, Noccalula cascades 90 feet into the Black Creek ravine. al, "Take a road trip to see North Alabama’s many waterfalls," 17 Apr. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'cascade.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of cascade

Noun

1641, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1702, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

History and Etymology for cascade

Noun and Verb

French, from Italian cascata, from cascare to fall, from Vulgar Latin *casicare, from Latin casus fall

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Time Traveler for cascade

Time Traveler

The first known use of cascade was in 1641

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Statistics for cascade

Last Updated

20 May 2020

Cite this Entry

“Cascade.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/cascade. Accessed 1 Jun. 2020.

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More Definitions for cascade

cascade

noun
How to pronounce cascade (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of cascade

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a small, steep waterfall especially : one that is part of a series of waterfalls
: a large amount of something that flows or hangs down
: a large number of things that happen quickly in a series

cascade

verb

English Language Learners Definition of cascade (Entry 2 of 2)

: to flow or hang down in large amounts

cascade

noun
cas·​cade | \ ka-ˈskād How to pronounce cascade (audio) \

Kids Definition of cascade

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a steep usually small waterfall

cascade

verb
cascaded; cascading

Kids Definition of cascade (Entry 2 of 2)

: to flow or fall rapidly and in large quantity Tears cascaded from the baby's eyes.

cascade

noun
cas·​cade | \ (ˌ)kas-ˈkād How to pronounce cascade (audio) \

Medical Definition of cascade

: a molecular, biochemical, or physiological process occurring in a succession of stages each of which is closely related to or depends on the output of the previous stage a cascade of enzymatic reactions the cascade of events comprising the immune response

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Comments on cascade

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