burgeon

verb
bur·geon | \ ˈbər-jən \
variants: or less commonly
burgeoned also bourgeoned; burgeoning also bourgeoning; burgeons also bourgeons

Definition of burgeon 

intransitive verb

1a : to send forth new growth (such as buds or branches) : sprout

b : bloom when the flame trees and jacaranda are burgeoning —Alan Carmichael

2 : to grow and expand rapidly : flourish The market for her work has burgeoned in recent years. tiny events which burgeon into national alarums —Herman Wouk

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Did You Know?

Burgeon comes from the Middle English word burjonen, which is from Anglo-French burjuner; both mean "to bud or sprout." "Burgeon" is often used figuratively, as when P.G. Wodehouse used it in Joy in the Morning: "I weighed this. It sounded promising. Hope began to burgeon." Usage commentators have objected to the use of "burgeon" to mean "to flourish" or "to grow rapidly," insisting that any figurative use should stay true to the word's earliest literal meaning and distinguish budding or sprouting from subsequent growing. But the sense of "burgeon" that indicates growing or expanding and prospering (as in "the burgeoning music scene" or "the burgeoning international market") has been in established use for decades, and is, in fact, the most common use of "burgeon" today.

Examples of burgeon in a Sentence

The market for collectibles has burgeoned in recent years. the trout population in the stream is burgeoning now that the water is clean

Recent Examples on the Web

The nation’s burgeoning pension crisis has spurred thousands of workers and retirees to rally in Ohio’s capital. Washington Post, "Thousands rally in Ohio for solution to pension crisis," 12 July 2018 You would be forgiven for not immediately noticing the economic impact of Trump’s burgeoning trade war with China. David Dayen, The New Republic, "The Inevitable Death of Global Trade As We Know It," 12 July 2018 The condiment was originally on the list of U.S. goods that would see higher import taxes as part of a burgeoning global trade war, however it was dropped just before July 1, when the tariffs went into effect. Chris Morris, Fortune, "Canada Gives Mustard a Reprieve in Retaliatory Trade War," 11 July 2018 The university has identified numerous lots for purchase and renovation; these properties will ultimately house the burgeoning academic and research programs. Jeffrey Barken, Jewish Journal, "Haifa's on the rise with university leading the way," 11 July 2018 And one person who has yet to comment on the burgeoning relationship is Bieber's ex, Selena Gomez. Amy Mackelden, Harper's BAZAAR, "Selena Gomez Just Completely Ignored Justin Bieber Engagement Questions," 10 July 2018 With a 3-point shot to go along with a burgeoning offensive game, the 6-foot-11 prospect with a 7-4 wingspan appears to have star power. Vince Ellis, Detroit Free Press, "Jaren Jackson Jr.'s weary Sunday caps fabulous NBA Summer League week," 9 July 2018 This, of course, is a burgeoning dystopic nightmare. Antonio García Martínez, WIRED, "How Silicon Valley Fuels an Informal Caste System," 9 July 2018 Since 2016, Mustard has been grooming 23-year-old burgeoning singer Ella Mai. Carl Lamarre, Billboard, "Mustard on Ella Mai's Potential as an Artist: 'I Think She's One of the Greatest'," 9 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'burgeon.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of burgeon

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for burgeon

Middle English burjonen, from Anglo-French burjuner, from burjun bud, from Vulgar Latin *burrion-, burrio, from Late Latin burra fluff, shaggy cloth

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Statistics for burgeon

Last Updated

17 Sep 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for burgeon

The first known use of burgeon was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for burgeon

burgeon

verb

English Language Learners Definition of burgeon

: to grow or develop quickly

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Comments on burgeon

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