brainchild

noun
brain·child | \ ˈbrān-ˌchī(-ə)ld \

Definition of brainchild 

: a product of one's creative effort

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Examples of brainchild in a Sentence

The museum is the brainchild of a wealthy art collector. the artificial language Esperanto was the brainchild of L. L. Zamenhof, a Polish oculist

Recent Examples on the Web

The blimp was the brainchild of activist Leo Murray, and resources for its construction were crowdfunded online. Bridget Read, Vogue, "Hot Air: London Swells With Protests Against Donald Trump," 13 July 2018 The Let's Get Social series is the brainchild of hip-hop artist Bekoe, the founder of iLLANOiZE. Matt Harvey, Chicago Reader, "iLLANOiZE Let's Get Social music showcase gives a platform to Chicago's rising hip-hop stars," 13 July 2018 Now the largest single-level Louis Vuitton retail floor in the Americas, the Costa Mesa space is the brainchild of architect Peter Marino, who combined a modern Southern California aesthetic with the brand’s historic French roots. Candice Baker Yacono, latimes.com, "Louis Vuitton South Coast Plaza reopens with store-exclusive merchandise," 12 July 2018 The getaway, held on 20 bucolic acres in central Maine, is the brainchild of Travis Mills, a former Army staff sergeant who is one of only five living veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan who have had all four limbs amputated. Brian Macquarrie, BostonGlobe.com, "At Maine retreat, disabled veterans find sense of belonging," 6 July 2018 Lorenzo said the operation was the brainchild of her husband, and she got caught along on the ride. David Ovalle, miamiherald, "Feds decided to deport her — two decades after her Miami marijuana arrest," 5 July 2018 The search effort is the brainchild of Marc Fries, NASA curator of cosmic dust, who has set up many meteorite hunts in the past. Jason Daley, Smithsonian, "A Research Ship Is Hunting Meteorite Fragments Off the Coast of Washington," 4 July 2018 The idea for the commemorative painting was the brainchild of Thomas Jefferson, who was hosting Trumbull exactly a decade after the signing in Paris, where the Virginian was serving as a representative of the United States. Olivia B. Waxman, Time, "This Painting Is Probably How You Imagine the Original Fourth of July. Here's What's Wrong With It," 3 July 2018 And then there’s Urban Art Gallery, the five-year-old brainchild of Morris, a postal carrier, real estate investor, and art lover. Valerie Russ, Philly.com, "Part safe space, part beacon, West Philly's Urban Art Gallery 'bridges the gap between violence and peace'," 11 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'brainchild.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of brainchild

1628, in the meaning defined above

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Last Updated

21 Aug 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for brainchild

The first known use of brainchild was in 1628

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More Definitions for brainchild

brainchild

noun

English Language Learners Definition of brainchild

: an idea, plan, or creation of one person

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