boosterism

noun
boost·​er·​ism | \ ˈbü-stər-ˌi-zəm How to pronounce boosterism (audio) \

Definition of boosterism

: the activities and attitudes characteristic of boosters

Examples of boosterism in a Sentence

Her article asserts that hometown boosterism keeps people from assessing the crime problem accurately.
Recent Examples on the Web Some commissioners expressed discomfort at being thrust into the role of boosterism. Sam Whiting, San Francisco Chronicle, "Four more years for SkyStar wheel in Golden Gate Park," 3 Mar. 2021 Buried beneath Tomer's boosterism for stimulus now, infrastructure later creates a more serious disagreement about defining infrastructure reform among centrist Democrats. Jeremy Lott, Washington Examiner, "Infrastructure week delayed again," 14 Jan. 2021 If Trump is re-elected, the US not participating in a UN climate forum will be a relatively minor concern compared to his administration’s likely continued rollback of environmental regulations and boosterism of fossil fuels. Tim Mcdonnell, Quartz, "The cost of a Trump term, in billions of tons of carbon emissions," 4 Nov. 2020 An energizing sense of optimism and opportunity, along with a heavy dose of boosterism, had fueled the city’s explosive growth, and those elements quickly went to work. Richard Babcock, WSJ, "‘Chicago’s Great Fire’ Review: Rising From the Ashes," 16 Oct. 2020 This past week has been a big one for carbon capture boosterism. Kate Aronoff, The New Republic, "Corporate America Is Irrationally Enthusiastic About Carbon Capture," 24 Sep. 2020 Our identity has changed significantly over the decades—from a compendium of inventions to industrial boosterism to reporting on scientific events to experts explaining their research to today, where a journalistic approach guides coverage. Jen Schwartz, Scientific American, "Reckoning with Our Mistakes," 18 Aug. 2020 Covid-19’s massive disruption to the global economy, paired with aggressive boosterism of green tech by the world’s governments, could be a turning point. Matt Simon, Wired, "Yes, Emissions Have Fallen. That Won't Fix Climate Change," 7 Aug. 2020 One drug, the anti-malarial drug hydroxychloroquine, has famously received a lot of boosterism from US President Donald Trump. Ryan Prior, CNN, "After saving his own life with a repurposed drug, a professor reviews every drug being tried against Covid-19. Here's what he's found," 27 June 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'boosterism.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of boosterism

1910, in the meaning defined above

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about boosterism

Time Traveler for boosterism

Time Traveler

The first known use of boosterism was in 1910

See more words from the same year

Statistics for boosterism

Last Updated

8 Mar 2021

Cite this Entry

“Boosterism.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/boosterism. Accessed 18 Apr. 2021.

Style: MLA
MLACheck Mark Icon ChicagoCheck Mark Icon APACheck Mark Icon Merriam-WebsterCheck Mark Icon

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for boosterism

boosterism

noun

English Language Learners Definition of boosterism

US : enthusiastic and usually excessive support for something or someone

Comments on boosterism

What made you want to look up boosterism? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

Test Your Vocabulary

The Exceptions Quiz III

  • one green toy robot amidst many red toy robots
  • Which of these words does not mean "nonsense"?
Spell It

Can you spell these 10 commonly misspelled words?

TAKE THE QUIZ
Typeshift

Anagram puzzles meet word search.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!