boodle

noun

boo·​dle ˈbü-dᵊl How to pronounce boodle (audio)
1
: a collection or lot of persons : caboodle
2
a
: bribe money
b
: a large amount especially of money

Examples of boodle in a Sentence

a boodle of teenagers boarded the bus together we saved a boodle by buying a house that's off the beaten path
Recent Examples on the Web There are more critical elections and bigger prizes on which that boodle is better spent. Jason Linkins, The New Republic, 4 Nov. 2023 Big Labor’s coffers, where the boodle has been put to use for preferred Democrat candidates and liberal referenda. Jack Fowler, National Review, 12 July 2022 To the extent that the effects are felt on those individuals’ bank accounts, these actors can typically find ways to navigate around the harshest of punishments and keep the boodle flowing. Blaise Malley, The New Republic, 17 Nov. 2021 His boodle took him to a pole barn on the edges of town, where his brother Ray was having a wedding reception. John Carlisle, Freep.com, 21 Aug. 2020 Laura Marston, a 38-year-old Type 1 diabetic, does not want to see the ADA get a dime of bailout boodle. Audrey Farley, The New Republic, 14 May 2020 But instead of plopping his funds in Manhattan high-rises or Miami beach-fronts, Kolomoisky’s network tried a different tack, opting to stuff his boodle in metallurgy plants across the Rust Belt, and buildings in downtown Cleveland. Casey Michel, The New Republic, 16 Dec. 2019 Some of the boodle is going to people who are barely farmers at all. BostonGlobe.com, 7 Dec. 2019 But if the politics of 2021 is to achieve anything close to what most Americans require, the path cannot be paved with the boodle and the influence of the wealthy. Libby Watson, The New Republic, 6 Sep. 2019 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'boodle.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Dutch boedel estate, lot, from Middle Dutch; akin to Old Norse būth booth

First Known Use

1625, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of boodle was in 1625

Dictionary Entries Near boodle

Cite this Entry

“Boodle.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/boodle. Accessed 23 Feb. 2024.

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