bluster

verb
blus·​ter | \ ˈblə-stər How to pronounce bluster (audio) \
blustered; blustering\ ˈblə-​st(ə-​)riŋ How to pronounce blustering (audio) \

Definition of bluster

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to talk or act with noisy swaggering threats brags and blusters but rarely does what he says he'll do
2a : to blow in stormy noisy gusts a cold, blustering wind
b : to be windy and boisterous … when autumn blusters and the orchard rocks.— Robert Browning

transitive verb

1 : to utter with noisy self-assertiveness "I don't want to hear it!" he blustered.
2 : to drive or force by blustering … trying to bluster us into the belief that they are much better than they look.— F. A. Swinnerton

bluster

noun

Definition of bluster (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a violent boisterous blowing … the strong breeze driving them was setting up a bluster on the water.— Rose Thurburn
2 : violent commotion They do their work without bluster or ostentation.— Stanley Walker
3 : loudly boastful or threatening speech growing tired of his macho bluster

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Other Words from bluster

Verb

blusterer \ ˈblə-​stər-​ər How to pronounce blusterer (audio) \ noun

Noun

blusterous \ ˈblə-​st(ə-​)rəs How to pronounce blusterous (audio) \ adjective
blustery \ ˈblə-​st(ə-​)rē How to pronounce blustery (audio) \ adjective

Examples of bluster in a Sentence

Verb

He brags and blusters, but he never really does what he says he'll do. “I don't want to hear it!” he blustered. The wind blustered through the valley.

Noun

We were all tired of his macho bluster. all the bluster in the campaign speech was intended to hide a lack of specifics
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

At times, the actor’s florid portrayal of the quirky, blustering general evokes, of all people, Frank Morgan’s Wizard of Oz. Don Aucoin, BostonGlobe.com, "Subject and style are at war in flawed ‘Ben Butler’," 5 Aug. 2019 But as his host blustered, Mr Khan seemed to have little cause for concern. The Economist, "America swaps its stick for a carrot in its dealings with Pakistan," 25 July 2019 Rather than endure a humiliating climb-down that would involve admission of cheating and the destruction of the new missiles, Putin is blustering new threats. Kyle Mizokami, Popular Mechanics, "As a Key Arms-Control Treaty Is Set to Die, Russia Threatens to Target U.S. with New Nukes," 20 Feb. 2019 And with that, Mai blustered through the mob with security on her tail. Bianca Alysse, Billboard, "Ella Mai Wins New York City Over With Her Enchanting Concert at S.O.B.'s," 16 May 2018 During the same period, my stepmother got breast cancer, my mother-in-law had brain surgery, and Donald Trump and Kim Jong Un blustered on about nuclear war. Jake Halpern, WSJ, "Drip, Drip: Why We Sweat the Small Stuff," 17 Apr. 2018 But as his host blustered, Mr Khan seemed to have little cause for concern. The Economist, "America swaps its stick for a carrot in its dealings with Pakistan," 25 July 2019 Rather than endure a humiliating climb-down that would involve admission of cheating and the destruction of the new missiles, Putin is blustering new threats. Kyle Mizokami, Popular Mechanics, "As a Key Arms-Control Treaty Is Set to Die, Russia Threatens to Target U.S. with New Nukes," 20 Feb. 2019 Abraham Lincoln even made an appearance, as did George Washington, each of them blustering about the foundations of this country. Rebecca Farley, refinery29.com, "The Bachelorette Wants To Have Its Cake & Be Political, Too," 3 July 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Collette is somewhat less nuanced as Detective Rasmussen, a brusque, f-bomb dropping cynic, but the actress brings a believable frustration and anger to her character’s bluster. Kristen Baldwin, EW.com, "Netflix's Unbelievable is the only True Detective season 4 we need," 3 Sep. 2019 Personally, all of that bluster and rage can wear a person down. Chris Woolston, Quartz at Work, "How to deal with an abusive boss," 29 Aug. 2019 Beneath the fresh bluster, in most departments preparations involve blowing the dust off old plans. The Economist, "Preparing for no deal is a paradoxical process," 1 Aug. 2019 Many analysts viewed the Saudi statements as bluster. Neanda Salvaterra, WSJ, "Oil Prices Gain for Third Session in a Row," 16 Oct. 2018 In Nigerian government circles, announcements of policy considerations are often more bluster than purposeful thinking. Yomi Kazeem, Quartz Africa, "Nigeria wants to start charging a tax on local online purchases," 5 Aug. 2019 Mr Johnson’s supporters insist that tough talk about Conservative MPs being willing to bring down their own government, or cross the floor to the Liberal Democrats or Plaid Cymru, is just bluster. The Economist, "Ditching the gags (and his enemies) Boris Johnson claims his prize," 25 July 2019 On the European side, the obstacles include the casual anti-Americanism exacerbated by Donald Trump’s bluster. Dalibor Rohac, National Review, "As They Confront China, Americans and Europeans Need Each Other," 28 June 2019 While some voices on each side have continued to ratchet up the bluster, others have in recent days seemed to probe for paths out of the confrontation. David D. Kirkpatrick, New York Times, "Iran’s Seizure of British Vessel Further Roils Gulf Region," 19 July 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'bluster.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of bluster

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Noun

1582, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for bluster

Verb and Noun

Middle English blustren, probably from Middle Low German blüsteren

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Statistics for bluster

Last Updated

7 Sep 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for bluster

The first known use of bluster was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for bluster

bluster

verb

English Language Learners Definition of bluster

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to speak in a loud and aggressive or threatening way
of wind : to blow loudly and violently

bluster

noun

English Language Learners Definition of bluster (Entry 2 of 2)

: words that are loud and aggressive

bluster

verb
blus·​ter | \ ˈblə-stər How to pronounce bluster (audio) \
blustered; blustering

Kids Definition of bluster

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to talk or act in a noisy boastful way
2 : to blow hard and noisily strong winds blustering

bluster

noun

Kids Definition of bluster (Entry 2 of 2)

: noisy violent action or speech

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More from Merriam-Webster on bluster

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with bluster

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for bluster

Spanish Central: Translation of bluster

Nglish: Translation of bluster for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of bluster for Arabic Speakers

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