bluster

verb
blus·​ter | \ ˈblə-stər How to pronounce bluster (audio) \
blustered; blustering\ ˈblə-​st(ə-​)riŋ How to pronounce bluster (audio) \

Definition of bluster

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to talk or act with noisy swaggering threats brags and blusters but rarely does what he says he'll do
2a : to blow in stormy noisy gusts a cold, blustering wind
b : to be windy and boisterous … when autumn blusters and the orchard rocks.— Robert Browning

transitive verb

1 : to utter with noisy self-assertiveness "I don't want to hear it!" he blustered.
2 : to drive or force by blustering … trying to bluster us into the belief that they are much better than they look.— F. A. Swinnerton

bluster

noun

Definition of bluster (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a violent boisterous blowing … the strong breeze driving them was setting up a bluster on the water.— Rose Thurburn
2 : violent commotion They do their work without bluster or ostentation.— Stanley Walker
3 : loudly boastful or threatening speech growing tired of his macho bluster

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Other Words from bluster

Verb

blusterer \ ˈblə-​stər-​ər How to pronounce bluster (audio) \ noun

Noun

blusterous \ ˈblə-​st(ə-​)rəs How to pronounce bluster (audio) \ adjective
blustery \ ˈblə-​st(ə-​)rē How to pronounce bluster (audio) \ adjective

Examples of bluster in a Sentence

Verb He brags and blusters, but he never really does what he says he'll do. “I don't want to hear it!” he blustered. The wind blustered through the valley. Noun We were all tired of his macho bluster. all the bluster in the campaign speech was intended to hide a lack of specifics
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb But Johnson likes to bluster his way past the facts, and von der Leyen likes to muster them. Washington Post, "Can a Supper Summit resolve Brexit at last? U.K.'s Boris Johnson heads to Brussels.," 9 Dec. 2020 The Herald continued to thrive, Bennett continued to bluster, crimes and calamities continued to happen. James M. Lundberg, Smithsonian Magazine, "How Horace Greeley Turned Newspapers Legitimate and Saved the Media From Itself," 6 Mar. 2020 Iran will bluster and threaten, but waging an all-out war with the U.S. would be suicidal, and Iran knows it. Victor Davis Hanson, National Review, "Iran’s Options in a Showdown with America Are All Bad," 9 Jan. 2020 At times, the actor’s florid portrayal of the quirky, blustering general evokes, of all people, Frank Morgan’s Wizard of Oz. Don Aucoin, BostonGlobe.com, "Subject and style are at war in flawed ‘Ben Butler’," 5 Aug. 2019 But as his host blustered, Mr Khan seemed to have little cause for concern. The Economist, "America swaps its stick for a carrot in its dealings with Pakistan," 25 July 2019 Rather than endure a humiliating climb-down that would involve admission of cheating and the destruction of the new missiles, Putin is blustering new threats. Kyle Mizokami, Popular Mechanics, "As a Key Arms-Control Treaty Is Set to Die, Russia Threatens to Target U.S. with New Nukes," 20 Feb. 2019 And with that, Mai blustered through the mob with security on her tail. Bianca Alysse, Billboard, "Ella Mai Wins New York City Over With Her Enchanting Concert at S.O.B.'s," 16 May 2018 During the same period, my stepmother got breast cancer, my mother-in-law had brain surgery, and Donald Trump and Kim Jong Un blustered on about nuclear war. Jake Halpern, WSJ, "Drip, Drip: Why We Sweat the Small Stuff," 17 Apr. 2018 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Despite all of the bluster, this proud Armenian family couldn’t be any closer. Bob Nightengale, USA TODAY, "'We scrubbed a lot of toilets:' Meet the newest first family of baseball, the Minasians," 16 Mar. 2021 Barr told colleagues he was frustrated by Trump’s bluster, baseless accusations about voter fraud and desire to criminalize political conduct. Del Quentin Wilber, Los Angeles Times, "U.S. Atty. Gen. Barr steps down amid tumult at Justice Department," 14 Dec. 2020 Trump's bluster, threats of trade wars and intense demands that Europe pay more for its defense angered many, particularly in the continent's two major powers: France and Germany. Matthew Lee, ajc, "US ties with Russia, China sink as Biden toes tough lines," 20 Mar. 2021 The actual facts are: Most Democrats sincerely hoped that Trump would be changed by the office, that his campaign bluster was just that. Star Tribune, "Readers Write: National healing, Inauguration Day, U.S. citizenship, comparing administrations," 21 Jan. 2021 Multiple actors play Scrooge; at my viewing Jac LaDoux handled the role with comic bluster at the start and giddy joy at the finish. Matthew J. Palm, orlandosentinel.com, "‘Christmas Carol’ variations work — to a point | Reviews," 12 Dec. 2020 That approach stands in contrast to the one used to respond to Iran by the Trump administration, which frequently followed Trump's lead by responding with threats and bluster. Joel Gehrke, Washington Examiner, "Biden administration won’t ‘prejudge’ attack on Iraq base amid Iran speculation," 16 Feb. 2021 Leader Shirkey should need no greater proof than last year’s disrupted plot to kidnap and kill Gov. Whitmer or the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol to understand how misogynistic, sexist and xenophobic bluster leads to real world violence. Dave Boucher, Detroit Free Press, "Michigan Senate Majority Leader Mike Shirkey gets blasted by women's commission," 11 Feb. 2021 Tuesday evening's burst of presidential pardons and bluster about blowing up the Covid relief deal felt, to this reporter, like a harbinger of a hyperactive week. Brian Stelter, CNN, "With Trump's time in office winding down, brace for a crazed Christmas news cycle," 22 Dec. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'bluster.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of bluster

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Noun

1582, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for bluster

Verb and Noun

Middle English blustren, probably from Middle Low German blüsteren

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Time Traveler for bluster

Time Traveler

The first known use of bluster was in the 15th century

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Statistics for bluster

Cite this Entry

“Bluster.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/bluster. Accessed 15 Apr. 2021.

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More Definitions for bluster

bluster

verb

English Language Learners Definition of bluster

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to speak in a loud and aggressive or threatening way
of wind : to blow loudly and violently

bluster

noun

English Language Learners Definition of bluster (Entry 2 of 2)

: words that are loud and aggressive

bluster

verb
blus·​ter | \ ˈblə-stər How to pronounce bluster (audio) \
blustered; blustering

Kids Definition of bluster

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to talk or act in a noisy boastful way
2 : to blow hard and noisily strong winds blustering

bluster

noun

Kids Definition of bluster (Entry 2 of 2)

: noisy violent action or speech

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Comments on bluster

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