bluster

verb
blus·​ter | \ ˈblə-stər How to pronounce bluster (audio) \
blustered; blustering\ ˈblə-​st(ə-​)riŋ How to pronounce bluster (audio) \

Definition of bluster

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to talk or act with noisy swaggering threats brags and blusters but rarely does what he says he'll do
2a : to blow in stormy noisy gusts a cold, blustering wind
b : to be windy and boisterous … when autumn blusters and the orchard rocks.— Robert Browning

transitive verb

1 : to utter with noisy self-assertiveness "I don't want to hear it!" he blustered.
2 : to drive or force by blustering … trying to bluster us into the belief that they are much better than they look.— F. A. Swinnerton

bluster

noun

Definition of bluster (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a violent boisterous blowing … the strong breeze driving them was setting up a bluster on the water.— Rose Thurburn
2 : violent commotion They do their work without bluster or ostentation.— Stanley Walker
3 : loudly boastful or threatening speech growing tired of his macho bluster

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Other Words from bluster

Verb

blusterer \ ˈblə-​stər-​ər How to pronounce bluster (audio) \ noun

Noun

blusterous \ ˈblə-​st(ə-​)rəs How to pronounce bluster (audio) \ adjective
blustery \ ˈblə-​st(ə-​)rē How to pronounce bluster (audio) \ adjective

Examples of bluster in a Sentence

Verb He brags and blusters, but he never really does what he says he'll do. “I don't want to hear it!” he blustered. The wind blustered through the valley. Noun We were all tired of his macho bluster. all the bluster in the campaign speech was intended to hide a lack of specifics
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb But Johnson likes to bluster his way past the facts, and von der Leyen likes to muster them. Washington Post, "Can a Supper Summit resolve Brexit at last? U.K.'s Boris Johnson heads to Brussels.," 9 Dec. 2020 The Herald continued to thrive, Bennett continued to bluster, crimes and calamities continued to happen. James M. Lundberg, Smithsonian Magazine, "How Horace Greeley Turned Newspapers Legitimate and Saved the Media From Itself," 6 Mar. 2020 Iran will bluster and threaten, but waging an all-out war with the U.S. would be suicidal, and Iran knows it. Victor Davis Hanson, National Review, "Iran’s Options in a Showdown with America Are All Bad," 9 Jan. 2020 At times, the actor’s florid portrayal of the quirky, blustering general evokes, of all people, Frank Morgan’s Wizard of Oz. Don Aucoin, BostonGlobe.com, "Subject and style are at war in flawed ‘Ben Butler’," 5 Aug. 2019 But as his host blustered, Mr Khan seemed to have little cause for concern. The Economist, "America swaps its stick for a carrot in its dealings with Pakistan," 25 July 2019 Rather than endure a humiliating climb-down that would involve admission of cheating and the destruction of the new missiles, Putin is blustering new threats. Kyle Mizokami, Popular Mechanics, "As a Key Arms-Control Treaty Is Set to Die, Russia Threatens to Target U.S. with New Nukes," 20 Feb. 2019 And with that, Mai blustered through the mob with security on her tail. Bianca Alysse, Billboard, "Ella Mai Wins New York City Over With Her Enchanting Concert at S.O.B.'s," 16 May 2018 During the same period, my stepmother got breast cancer, my mother-in-law had brain surgery, and Donald Trump and Kim Jong Un blustered on about nuclear war. Jake Halpern, WSJ, "Drip, Drip: Why We Sweat the Small Stuff," 17 Apr. 2018 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Both McConnell and Pelosi dismissed protests from House Republicans as bluster. Nicholas Rowan, Washington Examiner, "House tea party stars a decade on: Where are they now?," 26 Dec. 2020 As with so many of his policies, Trump’s approach to immigration became inseparable from his persona of bluster and harsh rhetoric. Michael Smolens Columnist, San Diego Union-Tribune, "Trump gets his wall, apparently with help from south of the border," 11 Dec. 2020 Now Extremist groups are notorious for their bluster and for fracturing into ever-tinier factions and eventually oblivion, and that could very well be what happens to the far-right once Trump is no longer in the White House. Emma Grey Ellis, Wired, "What Will Happen to the Far-Right After Trump?," 19 Nov. 2020 The outward-facing men of Trumpworld tended to be big, scruffy and full of bluster. Jacob Bernstein, New York Times, "The President’s Backup Band," 12 Nov. 2020 Years of political demagoguery, oratorical bluster and supercharged political rancor have changed how many Americans react to language that is bland, bureaucratic and institutional. Washington Post, "The Army’s new museum is what we need at this moment of constitutional peril," 12 Nov. 2020 And that’s what more than 75 million Americans voted for after being worn down by four years of Trump’s classless bluster. George Skelton, Los Angeles Times, "Column: I couldn’t stand ‘Happy Days Are Here Again.’ Then Biden and Harris were elected," 9 Nov. 2020 Chavira does an admirable job of showing the proud, loving father lurking behind the stage-dad bluster, and the sisterly bond between Selena and Suzette feels lived-in and real. San Diego Union-Tribune, "Column: In Netflix series on singer Selena Quintanilla, the focus is on the family," 4 Dec. 2020 So far, the election results have provided the president with lots of fuel for bluster but few avenues for the courts to interfere. Matt Ford, The New Republic, "Trump’s Legal Threats Have More Bravado Than Merit," 4 Nov. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'bluster.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of bluster

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Noun

1582, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for bluster

Verb and Noun

Middle English blustren, probably from Middle Low German blüsteren

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Time Traveler for bluster

Time Traveler

The first known use of bluster was in the 15th century

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Statistics for bluster

Last Updated

23 Dec 2020

Cite this Entry

“Bluster.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/bluster. Accessed 22 Jan. 2021.

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More Definitions for bluster

bluster

verb
How to pronounce bluster (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of bluster

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to speak in a loud and aggressive or threatening way
of wind : to blow loudly and violently

bluster

noun

English Language Learners Definition of bluster (Entry 2 of 2)

: words that are loud and aggressive

bluster

verb
blus·​ter | \ ˈblə-stər How to pronounce bluster (audio) \
blustered; blustering

Kids Definition of bluster

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to talk or act in a noisy boastful way
2 : to blow hard and noisily strong winds blustering

bluster

noun

Kids Definition of bluster (Entry 2 of 2)

: noisy violent action or speech

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Comments on bluster

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