bivalve

adjective
bi·​valve | \ ˈbī-ˌvalv How to pronounce bivalve (audio) \

Definition of bivalve

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: being or having a shell composed of two valves

bivalve

noun

Definition of bivalve (Entry 2 of 2)

: any of a class (Bivalvia synonym Pelecypoda) of typically marine mollusks (such as clams, oysters, or scallops) that have a 2-valved hinged shell, are usually filter feeders, and lack a distinct head

Examples of bivalve in a Sentence

Noun clams, mussels, oysters, and other bivalves
Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective The town’s big, bivalve-themed bash, Wellfleet Oyster Fest, happens annually on the weekend after Columbus Day (Oct. 19 and 20 this year) along Main Street. BostonGlobe.com, "Power to the pumpkin people! Six under-the-radar autumn escapes - The Boston Globe," 10 Oct. 2019 Deep-sea wood borers (Xylophaga, a genus of bivalve mollusks) take over where shallow water gribbles and shipworms left off. Brian Payton, Smithsonian, "How Driftwood Reshapes Ecosystems," 9 Feb. 2018 In 2005, the oyster as aphrodisiac got a big boost as many consumer publications reported that bivalve mollusks (which include clams, oysters, mussels and scallops) had been found to have desire-inducing properties. Alicia Ault, Smithsonian, "Are Oysters an Aphrodisiac?," 13 Feb. 2017 While the lyric connotes cozy relations between the famously fertile shellfish of this bivalve capital, feelings among shellfishermen themselves are decidedly less friendly. Corey Kilgannon, New York Times, "Claims Over Shellfish Fuel a Battle in the Bay," 30 June 2017 In 2005, the oyster as aphrodisiac got a big boost as many consumer publications reported that bivalve mollusks (which include clams, oysters, mussels and scallops) had been found to have desire-inducing properties. Alicia Ault, Smithsonian, "Are Oysters an Aphrodisiac?," 13 Feb. 2017 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The bivalves, just a few months old, were barely larger than a pencil tip. Katherine Kornei, New York Times, "The Invasion of Antarctica Begins With Mussels," 9 Apr. 2020 Meanwhile Hama Hama Company, the bivalve farm that usually supplies most of the city’s top restaurants, is shipping fresh oysters and clams to anyone looking to recreate the Seattle seafood experience at home. Jessica Voelker, Condé Nast Traveler, "How to Support Small Business in Seattle During COVID-19," 13 Apr. 2020 But the bivalves probably didn’t drift there, because circulating ocean currents effectively barricade Antarctica. Katherine Kornei, New York Times, "The Invasion of Antarctica Begins With Mussels," 9 Apr. 2020 Burrowing bivalves had embedded themselves inside the material—in fact, the things drilled right into the specimen’s skull. Matt Simon, Wired, "The Teeny-Tiny Flying Dino With a Mouth Full of Needle Teeth," 11 Mar. 2020 Selected from gulf, east, or west, a variety of bivalves satisfy a refined palate with preferences in brine, salinity, and creaminess. al, "These are the 10 best restaurants in Birmingham in 2020," 3 Mar. 2020 But here, where every oyster is a Malpeque, bivalves are known by their waters: Colville Bay, East Point, Savage Harbour. Chantal Martineau, Bon Appétit, "Beauty and Brine: Prince Edward Island Is an Oyster-Lover’s Paradise," 7 Nov. 2019 Despite the bivalves constantly being harvested for food, the gardens kept the remaining residents happy as, well, clams. Eva Frederick, Science | AAAS, "People and clams have a more complex history than you might think," 14 Oct. 2019 The bivalve mollusc is covered in algae and barnacles, lacking the clean lines most often associated with scallops. Nick Rahaim, SFChronicle.com, "Without abalone, spearfishing hooks North Coast anglers," 17 June 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'bivalve.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of bivalve

Adjective

1661, in the meaning defined above

Noun

1683, in the meaning defined above

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Time Traveler for bivalve

Time Traveler

The first known use of bivalve was in 1661

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Cite this Entry

“Bivalve.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/bivalve. Accessed 8 Jul. 2020.

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More Definitions for bivalve

bivalve

noun

English Language Learners Definition of bivalve

biology : a sea animal that has a shell with two movable parts connected by a hinge

bivalve

adjective
bi·​valve | \ ˈbī-ˌvalv How to pronounce bivalve (audio) \
variants: also bivalved \ -​ˌvalvd How to pronounce bivalved (audio) \

Medical Definition of bivalve

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: having or consisting of two corresponding movable pieces suggesting the shells of mollusks a bivalve speculum a bivalve cast
bivalved; bivalving

Medical Definition of bivalve (Entry 2 of 2)

: to split (a cast) along one or two sides (as to relieve pressure)

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More from Merriam-Webster on bivalve

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with bivalve

Spanish Central: Translation of bivalve

Nglish: Translation of bivalve for Spanish Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about bivalve

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