biased

adjective
bi·​ased | \ ˈbī-əst How to pronounce biased (audio) \

Definition of biased

1 : exhibiting or characterized by bias
2 : tending to yield one outcome more frequently than others in a statistical experiment a biased coin
3 : having an expected value different from the quantity or parameter estimated a biased estimate

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Bias vs. Biased

In recent years, we have seen more evidence of the adjectival bias in constructions like “a bias news program” instead of the more usual “a biased news program.” The reason is likely because of aural confusion: the -ed of biased may be filtered out by hearers, which means that bias and biased can sound similar in the context of normal speech. They are not interchangeable, however. The adjective that means “exhibited or characterized by an unreasoned judgment” is biased (“a biased news story”). There is an adjective bias, but it means “diagonal” and is used only of fabrics (“a bias cut across the fabric”).

Examples of biased in a Sentence

It's also politically biased, full of slighting references to the Whigs, whom Johnson detested, and imperiously chauvinistic, wherever possible dismissing or making light of words imported from French. — Charles McGrath, New York Times Book Review, 4 Dec. 2005 I am willing to believe that history is for the most part inaccurate and biased, but what is peculiar to our age is the abandonment of the idea that history could be truthfully written. In the past people deliberately lied, or they unconsciously colored what they wrote, or they struggled after the truth, well knowing that they must make many mistakes; but in each case they believed that 'the facts' existed and were more or less discoverable. — Leon Wieseltier, New Republic, 17 Feb. 2003 The information experts say that it's dangerous to conclude very much from talking to people because you will never interact with a scientifically selected random sample. Thus, the information you derive from meeting people is biased or anecdotal. — Will Manley, Booklist, 1 Mar. 2002 But even if you think I may be biased about the book's conclusions, please trust me about its awful prose. — James Martin, Commonweal, 3 May 2002 She is too biased to write about the case objectively. He is biased against women. The judges of the talent show were biased toward musical acts.
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Recent Examples on the Web President Nicolás Maduro’s government didn’t immediately respond to Bachelet’s latest comments, but rejected earlier criticism as biased and demanded corrections. Washington Post, "UN human rights chief cites continued abuses in Venezuela," 10 Sep. 2019 White Pride’ and national borders, shows the biased and politically slanted agenda of Emerson College. Emily Sweeney, BostonGlobe.com, "‘A perversion’: Emerson president rips Straight Pride Parade; organizer defends gathering," 28 Aug. 2019 Trump has made Mueller a regular target of attack over the past two years in an attempt to undermine his credibility and portray him as biased and compromised. Anchorage Daily News, "Mueller: I did not clear Trump of obstruction of justice," 24 July 2019 Trump's decisions, the leaders said, exposed Trump as firmly biased toward Israel and rendered his administration incapable of leading Israeli-Palestinian negotiations. Oren Liebermann, CNN, "Jerusalem gets first road sign for new US Embassy," 7 May 2018 But the company often has struggled to implement and enforce such rules uniformly, resulting at times in the viral spread of harmful content — or accusations that its executives and engineers are biased. Washington Post, "Facebook unveils charter for its ‘Supreme Court,’ where users can go to contest the company’s decisions," 17 Sep. 2019 The move here is environmental justice, pointing out that racist and economically biased policies have put certain kinds of people in harm’s way as climate change exacerbates environmental dangers. Wired, "What to Look for in CNN's 'Climate Crisis' Town Hall Tonight," 4 Sep. 2019 The easiest way to understand the issue is by returning to the conundrum of the biased coin. Hannah Fry, The New Yorker, "What Statistics Can and Can’t Tell Us About Ourselves," 2 Sep. 2019 Novices who don't bother to look under the hood might not recognize problems with their data sets or models, leading to overconfidence in biased or inaccurate results. Matthew Hutson, Science | AAAS, "No coding required: Companies make it easier than ever for scientists to use artificial intelligence," 31 July 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'biased.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of biased

1611, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for biased

see bias entry 1

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Statistics for biased

Last Updated

5 Nov 2019

Time Traveler for biased

The first known use of biased was in 1611

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More Definitions for biased

biased

adjective
How to pronounce biased (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of biased

: having or showing a bias : having or showing an unfair tendency to believe that some people, ideas, etc., are better than others

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More from Merriam-Webster on biased

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for biased

Spanish Central: Translation of biased

Nglish: Translation of biased for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of biased for Arabic Speakers

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