base-pair

verb
\ˈbās-ˌper \
base-paired; base-pairing; base-pairs

Definition of base-pair 

(Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to participate in formation of a base pair adenine base-pairs with thymine

base pair

noun

Definition of base pair (Entry 2 of 2)

: one of the pairs of nucleotide bases on complementary strands of nucleic acid that consist of a purine on one strand joined to a pyrimidine on the other strand by hydrogen bonds holding together the two strands much like the rungs of a ladder and that include adenine linked to thymine in DNA or to uracil in RNA and guanine linked to cytosine in both DNA and RNA

Examples of base-pair in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

What Catalog does, instead, is cheaply generate large quantities of a just a few different DNA molecules, each one not more than 30 base pairs long. Megan Molteni, WIRED, "The Rise of DNA Data Storage," 26 June 2018 Conveniently, just one DNA base pair differs between the Neanderthal gene and the modern human one. Jon Cohen, Science | AAAS, "Exclusive: Neanderthal “minibrains” grown in dish.," 20 June 2018 Biohackers will soon be able to forgo these companies altogether with an all-in-one desktop genome printer: a device much like an inkjet printer that employs the letters AGTC — genetic base pairs — instead of the color model CMYK. Emily Baumgaertner, New York Times, "As D.I.Y. Gene Editing Gains Popularity, ‘Someone Is Going to Get Hurt’," 14 May 2018 This resulted in about 350 billion DNA base pairs—chemical units of DNA that make up the genetic code. Rachael Bay, Scientific American, "Can Yellow Warblers Adapt to a Warmer Climate?," 29 May 2018 This resulted in about 350 billion DNA base pairs – chemical units of DNA that make up the genetic code. Rachael Bay, CBS News, "Can this bird adapt to a warmer climate? Read the genes to find out," 29 May 2018 Crispr is, however, already beginning to reshape the physical world around us in much less radical ways, one base pair at a time. Megan Molteni, WIRED, "The WIRED Guide to Crispr," 27 Apr. 2018 The versions aimed at consumers don’t typically sequence all base pairs of a person’s DNA, instead focusing on specific sections with strong information. Abigail Abrams, Time, "How Did They Catch the Golden State Killer? An Online DNA Service and His Genetic Relatives Revealed the Suspect," 26 Apr. 2018 Patients who benefited from Bristol-Myers’s drugs had a TMB score of at least 10, meaning that in a sample of 1 million base pairs — the alphabetic building blocks of DNA — at least 10 are mutated. Damian Garde, STAT, "Merck extends its lead in immuno-oncology with ‘practice-changing’ lung cancer data," 16 Apr. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'base-pair.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of base-pair

Verb

1973, in the meaning defined above

Noun

1955, in the meaning defined above

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The first known use of base-pair was in 1955

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More Definitions for base-pair

base pair

noun
\-ˈpa(ə)r, -ˈpe(ə)r \

Medical Definition of base pair 

(Entry 1 of 2)

: one of the pairs of nucleotide bases on complementary strands of nucleic acid that consist of a purine on one strand joined to a pyrimidine on the other strand by hydrogen bonds holding together the two strands much like the rungs of a ladder and that include adenine linked to thymine in DNA or to uracil in RNA and guanine linked to cytosine in both DNA and RNA

base pair

intransitive verb

Medical Definition of base pair (Entry 2 of 2)

: to participate in formation of a base pair adenine base pairs with thymine

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