bachelor

noun
bach·​e·​lor | \ ˈbach-lər How to pronounce bachelor (audio) , ˈba-chə- \

Definition of bachelor

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a young knight who follows the banner of another
2 : a person who has received a degree from a college, university, or professional school usually after four years of study bachelor of arts also : the degree itself received a bachelor of laws
3a : an unmarried man He chooses to remain a bachelor.
b : a male animal (such as a fur seal) without a mate during breeding time

bachelor

adjective

Definition of bachelor (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : suitable for or occupied by a single person a bachelor apartment
2 : unmarried bachelor women bachelor parents

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Other Words from bachelor

Noun

bachelordom \ ˈbach-​lər-​dəm How to pronounce bachelordom (audio) , ˈba-​chə-​ \ noun
bachelorhood \ ˈbach-​lər-​ˌhu̇d How to pronounce bachelorhood (audio) , ˈba-​chə-​ \ noun

Examples of bachelor in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Killingsworth served as student government association president and graduated from JSU with a bachelor’s degree in geography in 1999 and a master’s degree in counseling in 2001. William Thornton | Wthornton@al.com, al, "Jacksonville State University names new president," 23 June 2020 The student debt crisis has disproportionately affected Black students, who owe, on average, $7,400 more than their white peers after graduating with a bachelor’s degree, according to the Brookings Institution. Katie Reilly, Time, "Billionaire Robert F. Smith Launches New Initiative to Ease Student Debt at Historically Black Colleges," 23 June 2020 The median weekly earnings for full-time workers with a bachelor’s degree is $1,189. Teri Webster, Dallas News, "These North Texas cities have the highest percentage of college graduates in the state, study says," 22 June 2020 Grady is a 15 year education veteran who earned a bachelor’s degree from the University of North Texas and a master’s and doctorate degrees from Lamar University. Kristi Nix, Houston Chronicle, "Elkins High School’s Amber Grady honored as TASSP Region 4 Assistant Principal of the Year," 18 June 2020 In fact, those who watched SNL At Home got a glimpse of his bachelor pad. Shannon Carlin, refinery29.com, "Separating Fact From Fiction In King Of Staten Island," 15 June 2020 After his military service, the elder Mr. Sessions attended Baylor University, earning a bachelor’s degree in 1956 and a law degree in 1958. Robert D. Mcfadden, BostonGlobe.com, "William S. Sessions, FBI Director at a Turbulent Time, Dies at 90," 13 June 2020 Thomas is a native of Pleasant Ridge who graduated from Withrow High School and earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration at the University of Arizona and an MBA from Xavier University. Jeanne Houck, Cincinnati.com, "Man donates hundreds of thousand of dollars to police departments in Indian Hill, Madeira and Montgomery," 12 June 2020 Phil Knight, who graduated from Oregon with a bachelor’s degree in 1959, will be given an honorary degree from his alma mater. oregonlive, "Canzano: It’s about to be Dr. Phil Knight at the University of Oregon," 12 June 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'bachelor.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of bachelor

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Adjective

1840, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for bachelor

Noun

Middle English bacheler "knight lacking retainers, squire, young man (especially an unmarried one), person holding the lowest university degree," borrowed from Anglo-French, going back to Medieval Latin *baccalāris, variant of baccalārius, bachelārius "serf without land living in the lord's household, vassal lacking a fief, knight without retainers, young clerk, student," of obscure origin

Adjective

attributive use of bachelor entry 1

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Time Traveler for bachelor

Time Traveler

The first known use of bachelor was in the 14th century

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Statistics for bachelor

Last Updated

28 Jun 2020

Cite this Entry

“Bachelor.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/bachelor. Accessed 7 Jul. 2020.

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More Definitions for bachelor

bachelor

noun
How to pronounce bachelor (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of bachelor

: a man who is not married especially : a man who has never been married
: a person who has received a bachelor's degree

bachelor

noun
bach·​e·​lor | \ ˈba-chə-lər How to pronounce bachelor (audio) , ˈbach-lər \

Kids Definition of bachelor

: a man who is not married

Other Words from bachelor

bachelorhood \ -​ˌhu̇d \ noun

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