bachelor

1 of 2

noun

bach·​e·​lor ˈbach-lər How to pronounce bachelor (audio)
ˈba-chə-
1
: a young knight who follows the banner of another
2
: a person who has received a degree from a college, university, or professional school usually after four years of study
bachelor of arts
also : the degree itself
received a bachelor of laws
3
a
: an unmarried man
He chooses to remain a bachelor.
b
: a male animal (such as a fur seal) without a mate during breeding time
bachelordom
ˈbach-lər-dəm How to pronounce bachelor (audio)
ˈba-chə-
noun
bachelorhood noun

bachelor

2 of 2

adjective

1
: suitable for or occupied by a single person
a bachelor apartment
2
: unmarried
bachelor women
bachelor parents

Examples of bachelor in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web
Noun
Aspiring CMAs must have a bachelor’s degree from an accredited university, preferably with a focus on management accounting or financial management. Bryce Welker, Miami Herald, 2 Feb. 2024 Sacramento State President Luke Wood approved honoring him with a posthumous bachelor’s degree. Ishani Desai, Sacramento Bee, 2 Feb. 2024 Among those with a bachelor’s degree or higher, 39 percent worked remote or hybrid in December, compared with just 7 percent of people with a high school diploma or less, according to our friends at the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Andrew Van Dam, Washington Post, 2 Feb. 2024 Her mother, Maricel Blum, an artist, splits her time between Denver and Sweden and travels often to Africa to do educational outreach, said Ms. Blum, who graduated with a bachelor’s degree in business and psychology from the University of the Andes in Bogotá. Tammy Lagorce, New York Times, 2 Feb. 2024 To better support tribal communities, the University of Arizona’s Indigenous Teacher Education Program has trained at least 50 educators since 2016, with 11 bachelor’s degree candidates enrolled as of November 2023. Cameron Pugh, The Christian Science Monitor, 31 Jan. 2024 Buxton, who holds a bachelor’s degree in physics, pleaded guilty on Aug. 10, 2022, to a single parading count and was sentenced Dec. 2, 2022, to 18 months’ probation. Judy L. Thomas, Kansas City Star, 31 Jan. 2024 Hildebrand has a law degree from Washburn University School of Law and a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Oklahoma State University. Mary Divine, Twin Cities, 25 Jan. 2024 Students, those with some college experience or associate degree holders: 2% have some college experience or hold a two-year degree compared to 1% of workers without a high school diploma or those with a bachelor’s degree and higher. Nerdwallet, The Mercury News, 25 Jan. 2024
Adjective
Beyond tapping her extensive professional experience, Roman will draw on her bachelor degrees in geography and biology from Valparaiso University and master’s degree in geospatial science from Missouri State University (MSU). Jim Masters, Chicago Tribune, 2 Oct. 2022 The gap between those with a post-bachelor’s education and those with a high school diploma or less was similar, at 6% and 22%, respectively. Jill Tucker, San Francisco Chronicle, 13 Sep. 2022 Looks like someone's ready to enter the post-bachelor period of his life. Brendan Morrow, The Week, 13 June 2022 So, to give himself a chance at medical school, Tatum enrolled in a post-bachelor’s pre-medicine program at Rutgers University-Newark. Globe Staff, BostonGlobe.com, 22 Mar. 2022 The bachelor elephant group at Noah's Ark plays a key supporting role serving wider African Elephant conservation efforts as an important part of the European Endangered Species Programme. Vanessa Etienne, PEOPLE.com, 24 June 2021 Pumpkin, who lost her elderly partner, convinced Harris to forego his bachelor ways in the name of love. Mallory Hughes, CNN, 7 Dec. 2020 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'bachelor.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Noun

Middle English bacheler "knight lacking retainers, squire, young man (especially an unmarried one), person holding the lowest university degree," borrowed from Anglo-French, going back to Medieval Latin *baccalāris, variant of baccalārius, bachelārius "serf without land living in the lord's household, vassal lacking a fief, knight without retainers, young clerk, student," of obscure origin

Adjective

attributive use of bachelor entry 1

First Known Use

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Adjective

1840, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of bachelor was in the 14th century

Dictionary Entries Near bachelor

Cite this Entry

“Bachelor.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/bachelor. Accessed 21 Feb. 2024.

Kids Definition

bachelor

noun
bach·​e·​lor
ˈbach-(ə-)lər
1
: a person who has received the lowest degree given by a college, university, or professional school
bachelor of arts
also : the degree itself
2
a
: an unmarried man
b
: an unmated male animal
bachelorhood
-ˌhu̇d
noun
Last Updated: - Updated example sentences
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